DavidsonMauffetteGagnon2002

Référence

Davidson, R., Mauffette, Y. and Gagnon, D. (2002) Light requirements of seedlings: A method for selecting tropical trees for plantation forestry. Basic and Applied Ecology, 3(3):209-220.

Résumé

A greenhouse experiment was conducted on seedlings of three native trees from the Ecuadorian Amazon: Pollalesta discolor, Inga densiflora, and Platymiscium pinnatum. We studied their growth and photosynthetic performances in contrasting light environments, in order to assess the potential of these seedlings for future silvicultural use as well as to characterize their optimal light requirements. Seedlings were grown for 3.5 months in a greenhouse under three light intensities, full light (100%), partial shade (15%), and full shade (2.5%). Survival, growth, biomass allocation, leaf turnover and plant morphology were determined for all seedlings and gas exchange measurements were measured on a sub-sample of each species. Results showed that Pollalesta discolor had a high growth rate, a rapid leaf turnover, a large total leaf area and a high specific leaf area (SLA), coupled with high photosynthetic rates, when grown in a full-light environment. These traits confirm that it is shade intolerant, requiring a high-light environment for establishment as a seedling, characteristic of an early-successional species. Inga densiflora appeared to require some shade during its seedling stage, as shown by highest photosynthetic rates in partial shade. The full light treatment caused photoinhibition, impairing photosynthetic rates, and the full shade treatment was linked to high mortality, indicating that this species could not persist in a forest understory. Platymiscium pinnatum thrived equally well under both shade treatments, and had lower photosynthetic rates under the full light treatment. It was definitely a shade-tolerant species, displaying characteristics of a late-successional species. Increased growth performances with increased light intensity would indicate that this species could eventually benefit from higher light conditions. This experimental characterization of light requirements for seedlings of lesser known native species, through growth and photosynthetic performances under contrasting light environments, provided valuable information on their early establishment requirements, which could be used in selecting the proper light regime in nurseries and plantation models.

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@ARTICLE { DavidsonMauffetteGagnon2002,
    AUTHOR = { Davidson, R. and Mauffette, Y. and Gagnon, D. },
    TITLE = { Light requirements of seedlings: A method for selecting tropical trees for plantation forestry },
    JOURNAL = { Basic and Applied Ecology },
    YEAR = { 2002 },
    VOLUME = { 3 },
    PAGES = { 209-220 },
    NUMBER = { 3 },
    NOTE = { 14391791 (ISSN) Cited By (since 1996): 2 Export Date: 25 April 2007 Source: Scopus CODEN: BAEAC Language of Original Document: English Correspondence Address: Davidson, R.; Research and Development Division; Biodo?me de Montre?al; 4777 Pierre-De Coubertin Montre?al, Que. H1V 1B3, Canada; email: rdavidson@ville.montreal.qc.ca References: Ackerly, D.D., Canopy structure and dynamics: Integration of growth processes in tropical pioneer trees (1996) Tropical forest plant ecophysiology, pp. 619-658. , Mulkey SS, Chazdon RL, Smith AP (eds). Chapman and Hall, New York; Augspurger, C.K., Light requirements of neotropical tree seedlings: A comparative study of growth and survival (1984) Journal of Ecology, 72, pp. 777-795; Bazzaz, F.A., Dynamics of wet tropical forests and their species strategies (1984) Physiological ecology of plants of the wet tropics, pp. 233-243. , Medina E, Mooney HA, Vazquez-Yanes C (eds). Dr W Junk Publishers, The Hague; Bazzaz, F.A., Pickett, S.T.A., Physiological ecology of tropical succession: A comparative review (1980) Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics, 11, pp. 287-310; Bjo?rkman, O., Responses to different quantum flux densities (1981) Encyclopedia of plant physiology, New series vol. 12A, Physiological plant ecology I, 12 A, pp. 57-107. , Lange OL, Nobel PS, Osmond CB, Ziegler H (eds). Springer-Verlag, New-York; Bongers, F., Popma, J., Leaf dynamics of seedlings of rain forest species in relation to canopy gaps (1990) Oecologia, 82, pp. 122-127; Brokaw, N.V.L., Gap-phase regeneration in a tropical forest (1985) Ecology, 66, pp. 682-687; Chazdon, R.L., Fetcher, N., Photosynthetic light environments in a lowland tropical rain forest in Costa Rica (1984) Journal of Ecology, 72, pp. 553-564; Chazdon, R.L., Pearcy, R.W., Lee, D.W., Fetcher, N., Photosynthetic responses of tropical forest plants to contrasting light environments (1996) Tropical forest plant ecophysiology, pp. 5-55. , Mulkey SS, Chazdon RL, Smith AP (eds). Chapman and Hall, New York; Coley, P.D., Effects of plant growth rate and leaf lifetime on the amount and type of anti-herbivore defense (1988) Oecologia, 74, pp. 531-536; Davidson, R., Gagnon, D., Mauffette, Y., Hernandez, H., Early survival, growth and foliar nutrients in native Ecuadorian trees planted on degraded volcanic soil (1998) Forest Ecology and Management, 105, pp. 1-19; Dawkins, H.C., Crown diameters, their relation to bole diameter in tropical forest trees (1963) Commonwealth Forestry Review, 42, pp. 318-337; (1993) Forest resources assessment 1990, , Tropical countries. Publications Division, FAO, FAO Forestry Paper 112, Rome; Garci?a-Nun?ez, C., Azo?car, A., Rada, F., Photosynthetic acclimation to light in juveniles of two cloud forest tree species (1995) Trees, 10, pp. 114-124; Janzen, D.H., (1983) Costa Rican natural history, , The University of Chicago Press, Chicago; Hunt, R., (1990) Basic growth analysis, , Unwin Hyman Ltd, London; Kitajima, K., Ecophysiology of tropical tree seedlings (1996) Tropical forest plant ecophysiology, pp. 559-596. , Mulkey SS, Chazdon RL, Smith AP (eds). Chapman and Hall, New York; Kwesiga, F., Grace, J., The role of the red/far-red ratio in the response of tropical tree seedlings to shade (1986) Annals of Botany, 57, pp. 283-290; Lee, D.W., Irradiance and spectral quality affect Asian tropical rain forest tree seedling development (1996) Ecology, 77, pp. 568-580; Oberbauer, S.F., Donnelly, M.A., Growth analysis and successional status of Costa Rican rain forest trees (1986) The New Phytologist, 104, pp. 517-521; Oberbauer, S.F., Strain, B.R., Photosynthesis and successional status of Costa Rican rain forest trees (1984) Photosynthesis Research, 5, pp. 227-232; Raich, J.W., Seasonal and spatial variation in the light environment in a tropical Dipterocarp forest and gaps (1989) Biotropica, 21, pp. 299-302; Ramos, J., Grace, J., The effects of shade on the gas exchange of seedlings of four tropical trees from Mexico (1990) Functional Ecology, 4, pp. 667-677; Reich, P.B., Walters, M.B., Ellsworth, D.S., Leaf life-span in relation to leaf, plant, and stand characteristics among diverse ecosystems (1992) Ecological Monographs, 62, pp. 365-392; Reich, P.B., Walters, M.B., Ellsworth, D.S., Uhl, C., Photosynthesis-nitrogen relations in Amazonian tree species. 1. Patterns among species and communities (1994) Oecologia, 97, pp. 62-72; (1997) SAS/STAT user's guide, Release 6.11, , Edition SAS Inst., Cary; Sawyer, J., (1993) Plantations in the tropics: environmental concerns, , IUCN, Gland and Cambridge; Strauss-Debenedetti, S., Bazzaz, F.A., Photosynthetic characteristics of tropical trees along successional gradients (1996) Tropical forest plant ecophysiology, pp. 162-186. , Mulkey SS, Chazdon RL, Smith AP (eds). Chapman and Hall, New York; Tinoco-Ojanguren, C., Pearcy, R.W., A comparison of light quality and quantity effects on the growth and steady-state and dynamic photosynthetic characteristics of three tropical tree species (1995) Functional Ecology, 9, pp. 222-230; Valencia, R., Balslev, H., Paz y Min?o, G., High tree alpha-diversity in Amazonian Ecuador (1994) Biodiversity and Conservation, 3, pp. 21-28; Veenendaal, E.M., Swaine, M.D., Lecha, R.T., Walsh, M.F., Abebrese, I.K., Owusu-Afriyie, K., Responses of West African forest tree seedlings to irradiance and soil fertility (1996) Functional Ecology, 10, pp. 501-511. },
    ABSTRACT = { A greenhouse experiment was conducted on seedlings of three native trees from the Ecuadorian Amazon: Pollalesta discolor, Inga densiflora, and Platymiscium pinnatum. We studied their growth and photosynthetic performances in contrasting light environments, in order to assess the potential of these seedlings for future silvicultural use as well as to characterize their optimal light requirements. Seedlings were grown for 3.5 months in a greenhouse under three light intensities, full light (100%), partial shade (15%), and full shade (2.5%). Survival, growth, biomass allocation, leaf turnover and plant morphology were determined for all seedlings and gas exchange measurements were measured on a sub-sample of each species. Results showed that Pollalesta discolor had a high growth rate, a rapid leaf turnover, a large total leaf area and a high specific leaf area (SLA), coupled with high photosynthetic rates, when grown in a full-light environment. These traits confirm that it is shade intolerant, requiring a high-light environment for establishment as a seedling, characteristic of an early-successional species. Inga densiflora appeared to require some shade during its seedling stage, as shown by highest photosynthetic rates in partial shade. The full light treatment caused photoinhibition, impairing photosynthetic rates, and the full shade treatment was linked to high mortality, indicating that this species could not persist in a forest understory. Platymiscium pinnatum thrived equally well under both shade treatments, and had lower photosynthetic rates under the full light treatment. It was definitely a shade-tolerant species, displaying characteristics of a late-successional species. Increased growth performances with increased light intensity would indicate that this species could eventually benefit from higher light conditions. This experimental characterization of light requirements for seedlings of lesser known native species, through growth and photosynthetic performances under contrasting light environments, provided valuable information on their early establishment requirements, which could be used in selecting the proper light regime in nurseries and plantation models. },
    KEYWORDS = { Ecophysiology Growth Light environment Photosynthesis Seedling establishment Tropical forestry Tropical tree seedlings Inga Platymiscium },
    OWNER = { brugerolles },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2007.12.05 },
}

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