CyrBergeronGauthierEtAl2005

Référence

Cyr, D., Bergeron, Y., Gauthier, S. and Larouche, A.C. (2005) Are the old-growth forests of the Clay Belt part of a fire-regulatedmosaic? Canadian Journal of Forest Research, 35(1):65-73.

Résumé

Old-growth forests make up a substantial proportion of the forestmosaic in the Clay Belt region of Ontario and Quebec, Canada, despitefire cycles that are presumed to be relatively short. Two hypotheseshave been suggested as explanations for this phenomenon: (1) theold-growth forests in question are located on sites that are protectedfrom fire or (2) the fire hazard is just as great there as elsewhere,and that part of the mosaic is simply the tail of the distribution,having been spared from fire merely by chance. The tree-ring methodhas proven inadequate as a means of determining the date of themost recent fire in these old-growth forests, as the time that haselapsed since that date probably exceeds the age of the oldest trees.Accordingly, a paleoecological study was conducted with a view todetermining the date of the last fire in these forests. Charcoalhorizons were located and radiocarbon dated in six old-growth forests.The possibility that these forests have never burned at all is ruledout by the fact that macroscopic charcoal fragments were found atall sites. The proximity of potential firebreaks has a significantinfluence in the survival model, suggesting fire-cycle heterogeneitythroughout the landscape. However, the proportion of old-growthforests observed is in agreement with what would be expected assumingthat fire hazard is independent of stand age. Old-growth standscould thus be incorporated into natural disturbance based management,although the great variability of the intervals between catastrophicdisturbances should be carefully considered. © 2005 NRC Canada.

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@ARTICLE { CyrBergeronGauthierEtAl2005,
    AUTHOR = { Cyr, D. and Bergeron, Y. and Gauthier, S. and Larouche, A.C. },
    TITLE = { Are the old-growth forests of the Clay Belt part of a fire-regulatedmosaic? },
    JOURNAL = { Canadian Journal of Forest Research },
    YEAR = { 2005 },
    VOLUME = { 35 },
    PAGES = { 65-73 },
    NUMBER = { 1 },
    ABSTRACT = { Old-growth forests make up a substantial proportion of the forestmosaic in the Clay Belt region of Ontario and Quebec, Canada, despitefire cycles that are presumed to be relatively short. Two hypotheseshave been suggested as explanations for this phenomenon: (1) theold-growth forests in question are located on sites that are protectedfrom fire or (2) the fire hazard is just as great there as elsewhere,and that part of the mosaic is simply the tail of the distribution,having been spared from fire merely by chance. The tree-ring methodhas proven inadequate as a means of determining the date of themost recent fire in these old-growth forests, as the time that haselapsed since that date probably exceeds the age of the oldest trees.Accordingly, a paleoecological study was conducted with a view todetermining the date of the last fire in these forests. Charcoalhorizons were located and radiocarbon dated in six old-growth forests.The possibility that these forests have never burned at all is ruledout by the fact that macroscopic charcoal fragments were found atall sites. The proximity of potential firebreaks has a significantinfluence in the survival model, suggesting fire-cycle heterogeneitythroughout the landscape. However, the proportion of old-growthforests observed is in agreement with what would be expected assumingthat fire hazard is independent of stand age. Old-growth standscould thus be incorporated into natural disturbance based management,although the great variability of the intervals between catastrophicdisturbances should be carefully considered. © 2005 NRC Canada. },
    KEYWORDS = { Charcoal Fires Mathematical models Radioisotopes Catastrophic disturbancesCharcoal fragments Fire cycle Landscape Forestry charcoal fire historyforest management old-growth forest paleoecology radiocarbon datingCharcoal Forest Fires Forestry Mathematical Models RadioisotopesCanada North America Ontario Quebec [Canada] Western HemisphereWorld },
    OWNER = { brugerolles },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2007.12.04 },
}

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