SmithHarveyKoubaaEtAl2016

Référence

Smith, J., Harvey, B.D., Koubaa, A., Brais, S. and Mazerolle, M.J. (2016) Sprucing up the mixedwoods: Growth response of white spruce (picea glauca) to partial cutting in the eastern Canadian boreal forest. Canadian Journal of Forest Research, 46(10):1205-1215. (Scopus )

Résumé

Mixed-species stands present a number of opportunities for and challenges to forest managers. Boreal mixedwood stands in eastern Canada are often characterized by a dominant canopy of shade-intolerant aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) with more shade-tolerant conifers in the midto sub-canopy layers. Because the aspen and conifer components often attain optimal merchantable sizes at different moments in stand development, there is an interest in developing silvicultural practices that allow partial or total removal of aspen and favour accelerated growth of residual conifers. We tested four partial harvesting treatments in mixed aspen - white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench.) Voss) stands in which different proportions of aspen (0%, 50%, 65%, and 100% basal area) were removed. Ten years after treatments, 72 spruce stems representing dominant, co-dominant, and suppressed social classes were destructively sampled for stem analysis. Using linear mixed effect models, we analyzed growth as a function of treatment intensity, time since treatment, social status, pretreatment growth rate, and neighbourhood competition. Relative to control stands, radial and volume growth responses were detected only in the extreme treatment of 100% aspen removal. In relative terms, suppressed trees showed the greatest magnitude of cumulative growth increase. Compared with control trees, average annual radial and volume increments were, respectively, 23.5% and 7.1% higher for dominant trees, 67.7% and 24.1% higher for co-dominant trees, and 115.8% and 65.6% higher for suppressed trees over the 10 years after treatment. Growth response was proportional to pretreatment growth rate, and among neighbouring trees, only coniferous neighbours had a negative effect on white spruce growth. Our results suggest that in similar mixed-stand conditions, relatively heavy removal of overstory aspen accompanied by thinning of crowded conifers would result in greatest growth response of residual spruce stems. © 2016, Canadian Science Publishing. All rights reserved.

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@ARTICLE { SmithHarveyKoubaaEtAl2016,
    AUTHOR = { Smith, J. and Harvey, B.D. and Koubaa, A. and Brais, S. and Mazerolle, M.J. },
    TITLE = { Sprucing up the mixedwoods: Growth response of white spruce (picea glauca) to partial cutting in the eastern Canadian boreal forest },
    JOURNAL = { Canadian Journal of Forest Research },
    YEAR = { 2016 },
    VOLUME = { 46 },
    NUMBER = { 10 },
    PAGES = { 1205-1215 },
    NOTE = { cited By 0 },
    ABSTRACT = { Mixed-species stands present a number of opportunities for and challenges to forest managers. Boreal mixedwood stands in eastern Canada are often characterized by a dominant canopy of shade-intolerant aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) with more shade-tolerant conifers in the midto sub-canopy layers. Because the aspen and conifer components often attain optimal merchantable sizes at different moments in stand development, there is an interest in developing silvicultural practices that allow partial or total removal of aspen and favour accelerated growth of residual conifers. We tested four partial harvesting treatments in mixed aspen - white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench.) Voss) stands in which different proportions of aspen (0%, 50%, 65%, and 100% basal area) were removed. Ten years after treatments, 72 spruce stems representing dominant, co-dominant, and suppressed social classes were destructively sampled for stem analysis. Using linear mixed effect models, we analyzed growth as a function of treatment intensity, time since treatment, social status, pretreatment growth rate, and neighbourhood competition. Relative to control stands, radial and volume growth responses were detected only in the extreme treatment of 100% aspen removal. In relative terms, suppressed trees showed the greatest magnitude of cumulative growth increase. Compared with control trees, average annual radial and volume increments were, respectively, 23.5% and 7.1% higher for dominant trees, 67.7% and 24.1% higher for co-dominant trees, and 115.8% and 65.6% higher for suppressed trees over the 10 years after treatment. Growth response was proportional to pretreatment growth rate, and among neighbouring trees, only coniferous neighbours had a negative effect on white spruce growth. Our results suggest that in similar mixed-stand conditions, relatively heavy removal of overstory aspen accompanied by thinning of crowded conifers would result in greatest growth response of residual spruce stems. © 2016, Canadian Science Publishing. All rights reserved. },
    AUTHOR_KEYWORDS = { Boreal; Growth response; Mixedwood; Partial cutting; White spruce },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Article },
    DOI = { 10.1139/cjfr-2015-0489 },
    KEYWORDS = { Ecology; Research, Boreal; Growth response; Mixedwood; Partial cutting; White spruce, Forestry, Coniferophyta; Picea; Picea glauca; Populus tremuloides },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84988650819&partnerID=40&md5=4195557b15b87fbce40c15b97024b143 },
}

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