WallaceLaforest-LapointeKembel2018

Référence

Wallace, J., Laforest-Lapointe, I. and Kembel, S.W. (2018) Variation in the leaf and root microbiome of sugar maple (Acer saccharum) at an elevational range limit. PeerJ, 2018(8). (Scopus )

Résumé

Background. Bacteria, archaea, viruses and fungi live in various plant compartments including leaves and roots. These plant-associated microbial communities have many effects on host fitness and function. Global climate change is impacting plant species distributions, a phenomenon that will affect plant-microbe interactions both directly and indirectly. In order to predict plant responses to global climate change, it will be crucial to improve our understanding of plant-microbe interactions within and at the edge of plant species natural ranges. While microbes affect their hosts, in turn the plant's attributes and the surrounding environment drive the structure and assembly of the microbial communities themselves. However, the patterns and dynamics of these interactions and their causes are poorly understood. Methods. In this study, we quantified the microbial communities of the leaves and roots of seedlings of the deciduous tree species sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marshall) within its natural range and at the species' elevational range limit at Mont-Mégantic, Quebec. Using high-throughput DNA sequencing, we quantified the bacterial and fungal community structure in four plant compartments: the epiphytes and endophytes of leaves and roots. We also quantified endophytic fungal communities in roots. Results. The bacterial and fungal communities of A. saccharum seedlings differ across elevational range limits for all four plant compartments. Distinct microbial communities colonize each compartment, although the microbial communities inside a plant's structure (endophytes) were found to be a subset of the communities found outside the plant's structure (epiphytes). Plant-associated bacterial communities were dominated by the phyla Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes while the main fungal taxa present were Ascomycota. Discussion. We demonstrate that microbial communities associated with sugar maple seedlings at the edge of the species' elevational range differ from those within the natural range. Variation in microbial communities differed among plant components, suggesting the importance of each compartment's exposure to changes in biotic and abiotic conditions in determining variability in community structure. These findings provide a greater understanding of the ecological processes driving the structure and diversity of plant-associated microbial communities within and at the edge of a plant species range, and suggest the potential for biotic interactions between plants and their associated microbiota to influence the dynamics of plant range edge boundaries and responses to global change. © 2018 Wallace et al.

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@ARTICLE { WallaceLaforest-LapointeKembel2018,
    AUTHOR = { Wallace, J. and Laforest-Lapointe, I. and Kembel, S.W. },
    TITLE = { Variation in the leaf and root microbiome of sugar maple (Acer saccharum) at an elevational range limit },
    JOURNAL = { PeerJ },
    YEAR = { 2018 },
    VOLUME = { 2018 },
    NUMBER = { 8 },
    NOTE = { cited By 0 },
    ABSTRACT = { Background. Bacteria, archaea, viruses and fungi live in various plant compartments including leaves and roots. These plant-associated microbial communities have many effects on host fitness and function. Global climate change is impacting plant species distributions, a phenomenon that will affect plant-microbe interactions both directly and indirectly. In order to predict plant responses to global climate change, it will be crucial to improve our understanding of plant-microbe interactions within and at the edge of plant species natural ranges. While microbes affect their hosts, in turn the plant's attributes and the surrounding environment drive the structure and assembly of the microbial communities themselves. However, the patterns and dynamics of these interactions and their causes are poorly understood. Methods. In this study, we quantified the microbial communities of the leaves and roots of seedlings of the deciduous tree species sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marshall) within its natural range and at the species' elevational range limit at Mont-Mégantic, Quebec. Using high-throughput DNA sequencing, we quantified the bacterial and fungal community structure in four plant compartments: the epiphytes and endophytes of leaves and roots. We also quantified endophytic fungal communities in roots. Results. The bacterial and fungal communities of A. saccharum seedlings differ across elevational range limits for all four plant compartments. Distinct microbial communities colonize each compartment, although the microbial communities inside a plant's structure (endophytes) were found to be a subset of the communities found outside the plant's structure (epiphytes). Plant-associated bacterial communities were dominated by the phyla Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes while the main fungal taxa present were Ascomycota. Discussion. We demonstrate that microbial communities associated with sugar maple seedlings at the edge of the species' elevational range differ from those within the natural range. Variation in microbial communities differed among plant components, suggesting the importance of each compartment's exposure to changes in biotic and abiotic conditions in determining variability in community structure. These findings provide a greater understanding of the ecological processes driving the structure and diversity of plant-associated microbial communities within and at the edge of a plant species range, and suggest the potential for biotic interactions between plants and their associated microbiota to influence the dynamics of plant range edge boundaries and responses to global change. © 2018 Wallace et al. },
    AFFILIATION = { Département des sciences biologiques, Université du Québec à Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada; Departments of Physiology and Pharmacology, and Pediatrics, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada },
    ART_NUMBER = { e5293 },
    AUTHOR_KEYWORDS = { Endophyte; Environmental gradient; Epiphyte; Forest ecology; Microbial ecology; Phyllosphere; Plant-microbe interactions; Range limit; Rhizosphere; Sugar maple },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Article },
    DOI = { 10.7717/peerj.5293 },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85051513749&doi=10.7717%2fpeerj.5293&partnerID=40&md5=e2fd44796908add385349e66bef0e099 },
}

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