KrawchukCumming2011

Référence

Krawchuk, M.A., Cumming, S.G. (2011) Effects of biotic feedback and harvest management on boreal forest fire activity under climate change. Ecological Applications, 21(1):122-136. (Scopus )

Résumé

Predictions of future fire activity over Canada's boreal forests have primarily been generated from climate data following assumptions that direct effects of weather will stand alone in contributing to changes in burning. However, this assumption needs explicit testing. First, areas recently burned can be less likely to burn again in the near term, and this endogenous regulation suggests the potential for self-limiting, negative biotic feedback to regional climate-driven increases in fire. Second, forest harvest is ongoing, and resulting changes in vegetation structure have been shown to affect fire activity. Consequently, we tested the assumption that fire activity will be driven by changes in fire weather without regulation by biotic feedback or regional harvest-driven changes in vegetation structure in the mixedwood boreal forest of Alberta, Canada, using a simulation experiment that includes the interaction of fire, stand dynamics, climate change, and clear cut harvest management. We found that climate change projected with fire weather indices calculated from the Canadaian Regional Climate Model increased fire activity, as expected, and our simulations established evidence that the magnitude of regional increase in fire was sufficient to generate negative feedback to subsequent fire activity. We illustrate a 39% (1.39-fold) increase in fire initiation and 47% (1.47-fold) increase in area burned when climate and stand dynamics were included in simulations, yet 48% (1.48-fold) and 61% (1.61-fold) increases, respectively, when climate was considered alone. Thus, although biotic feedbacks reduced burned area estimates in important ways, they were secondary to the direct effect of climate on fire. We then show that ongoing harvest management in this region changed landscape composition in a way that led to reduced fire activity, even in the context of climate change. Although forest harvesting resulted in decreased regional fire activity when compared to unharvested conditions, forest composition and age structure was shifted substantially, illustrating a trade-off between management goals to minimize fire and conservation goals to emulate natural disturbance. © 2011 by the Ecological Society of America.

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@ARTICLE { KrawchukCumming2011,
    AUTHOR = { Krawchuk, M.A. and Cumming, S.G. },
    TITLE = { Effects of biotic feedback and harvest management on boreal forest fire activity under climate change },
    JOURNAL = { Ecological Applications },
    YEAR = { 2011 },
    VOLUME = { 21 },
    PAGES = { 122-136 },
    NUMBER = { 1 },
    ABSTRACT = { Predictions of future fire activity over Canada's boreal forests have primarily been generated from climate data following assumptions that direct effects of weather will stand alone in contributing to changes in burning. However, this assumption needs explicit testing. First, areas recently burned can be less likely to burn again in the near term, and this endogenous regulation suggests the potential for self-limiting, negative biotic feedback to regional climate-driven increases in fire. Second, forest harvest is ongoing, and resulting changes in vegetation structure have been shown to affect fire activity. Consequently, we tested the assumption that fire activity will be driven by changes in fire weather without regulation by biotic feedback or regional harvest-driven changes in vegetation structure in the mixedwood boreal forest of Alberta, Canada, using a simulation experiment that includes the interaction of fire, stand dynamics, climate change, and clear cut harvest management. We found that climate change projected with fire weather indices calculated from the Canadaian Regional Climate Model increased fire activity, as expected, and our simulations established evidence that the magnitude of regional increase in fire was sufficient to generate negative feedback to subsequent fire activity. We illustrate a 39% (1.39-fold) increase in fire initiation and 47% (1.47-fold) increase in area burned when climate and stand dynamics were included in simulations, yet 48% (1.48-fold) and 61% (1.61-fold) increases, respectively, when climate was considered alone. Thus, although biotic feedbacks reduced burned area estimates in important ways, they were secondary to the direct effect of climate on fire. We then show that ongoing harvest management in this region changed landscape composition in a way that led to reduced fire activity, even in the context of climate change. Although forest harvesting resulted in decreased regional fire activity when compared to unharvested conditions, forest composition and age structure was shifted substantially, illustrating a trade-off between management goals to minimize fire and conservation goals to emulate natural disturbance. © 2011 by the Ecological Society of America. },
    COMMENT = { Export Date: 24 May 2011 Source: Scopus CODEN: ECAPE doi: 10.1890/09-2004.1 },
    ISSN = { 10510761 (ISSN) },
    KEYWORDS = { Biotic feedback, Boreal forest, Boreal mixedwood, Boreal plains, Canada, Central-eastern Alberta, Climate change, Density dependence, Forest harvesting, Mitigation, Self-limiting, Simulation model, Wildfire },
    OWNER = { Luc },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2011.05.24 },
    URL = { http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-79955530566&partnerID=40&md5=f013dc5fa9dd4f5282add8ba2c28e75a },
}

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