LavoieBradley2003a

Référence

Lavoie, M. and Bradley, R.L. (2003) Inferred effects of cloud deposition on forest floor nutrient cycling and microbial properties along a short elevation gradient. Environmental Pollution, 121(3):333-344.

Résumé

Cloud water deposition often increases with elevation, and it is widely accepted that this cloud water increases acid loading to upland forest ecosystems. A study was undertaken in south-eastern Que?bec to determine if a 250 m elevation gradient (i.e. 420-665 m), along a uniform sugar-maple stand on the slope of Mount Orford, corresponded to a pH gradient in the forest floor and to predictable changes in soil nutrient availability and microbial properties. Precipitation data from a nearby study, and a photographic survey, provided presumptive evidence that this elevation gradient corresponded to a strong gradient in cloud water deposition. Forest floor temperature did not differ significantly across elevations. Forest floor moisture content was significantly higher, whereas pH and exchangeable Ca and Mg were significantly lower, at the higher elevations. Average seasonal net nitrification rates, determined by long-term laboratory incubations, did not differ significantly across elevations, whereas average seasonal net ammonification rates were significantly higher at higher elevations. Basal respiration rates and microbial biomass did not differ significantly across elevations, but metabolic quotient was significantly higher at higher elevations indicating possible environmental stress on forest floor microbial communities due to cloud water deposition. Anaerobic N mineralisation rates were significantly higher at higher elevations suggesting that N-limited microbial communities frequently exposed to cloud cover can be important short-term sinks for atmospheric N, thereby contributing to increase the active-N fraction of forest floors. We conclude that, where no significant changes in vegetation or temperature occur, elevation gradients can still be used to understand the spatial variability of nutrient cycles and microbial properties. © 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

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@ARTICLE { LavoieBradley2003a,
    AUTHOR = { Lavoie, M. and Bradley, R.L. },
    TITLE = { Inferred effects of cloud deposition on forest floor nutrient cycling and microbial properties along a short elevation gradient },
    JOURNAL = { Environmental Pollution },
    YEAR = { 2003 },
    VOLUME = { 121 },
    PAGES = { 333-344 },
    NUMBER = { 3 },
    NOTE = { 02697491 (ISSN) Cited By (since 1996): 2 Export Date: 26 April 2007 Source: Scopus CODEN: ENPOE doi: 10.1016/S0269-7491(02)00240-3 Language of Original Document: English Correspondence Address: Bradley, R.L.; Centre de Rech. en Biol. Forestiere; Departement de Biologie; Universite de Sherbrooke; 2500 boulevard de l'Universite Sherbrooke, Que. J1K 2R1, Canada; email: robert.bradley@courrier.usherb.ca Chemicals/CAS: calcium, 7440-70-2; magnesium, 7439-95-4; Calcium, 7440-70-2; Magnesium, 7439-95-4; Nitrogen, 7727-37-9 References: Anderson, J.P.E., Domsch, K.H., A physiological method for the quantitative measurement of microbial biomass in soils (1978) Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 10, pp. 215-221; Anderson, T.H., Domsch, K.H., The metabolic quotient (qCO2) as a specific activity parameter to assess the effects of environmental conditions, such as pH, on the microbial biomass of forest soils (1993) Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 25, pp. 393-395; Arthur, M.A., Siccama, T.G., Yanai, R.D., Calcium and magnesium in wood of northern hardwood forest species: Relations to site characteristics (1999) Canadian Journal of Forest Research, 29, pp. 339-346; Bernier, B., Brazeau, M., Nutrient deficiency symptoms associated with sugar maple dieback and decline in the Quebec Appalachians (1988) Canadian Journal of Forest Research, 18, pp. 762-767; Bradley, R.L., Fyles, J.W., A kinetic parameter describing soil available carbon and its relationship to rate increase in C mineralization (1995) Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 27, pp. 167-172; Bradley, R.L., Fyles, J.W., Interactions between tree seedling roots and humus forms in the control of soil C and N cycling (1996) Biology and Fertility of Soils, 23, pp. 70-79; Bradley, R.L., Titus, B.D., Preston, C.P., Changes to mineral N cycling and microbial communities in black spruce humus after additions of (NH4)2SO4 and condensed tannins extracted from Kalmia angustifolia and balsam fir (2000) Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 32, pp. 1227-1240; Bradley, R.L., Titus, B.D., Preston, C.M., Bennett, J., Improvement of nutritional site quality 13 years after single applications of fertiliser N and P on regenerating cedar-hemlock cutovers on northern Vancouver Island, B.C (2000) Plant and Soil, 223, pp. 195-206; Chang, S.X., Trofymow, J.A., Microbial respiration and biomass (substrate-induced respiration) in soils of old-growth and regenerating forests on northern Vancouver Island, British Columbia (1996) Biology and Fertility of Soils, 23, pp. 145-152; Co?te?, B., Fyles, J.W., Nutrient concentration and acid-base status of leaf litter of tree species characteristic of hardwood forest of southern Quebec (1994) Canadian Journal of Forest Research, 24, pp. 192-196; Co?te?, B., Hendershot, W.H., Fyles, J.W., Roy, A.G., Bradley, R., Biron, P.M., Courchesne, F., The phenology of fine root growth in a maple-dominated ecosystem: Relationship with some soil properties (1998) Plant and Soil, 201, pp. 59-69; DeHayes, D.H., Thornton, F.C., Waite, C.E., Ingle, M.A., Ambient cloud deposition reduces cold tolerance of red spruce seedlings (1991) Canadian Journal of Forest Research, 21, pp. 1292-1295; Foster, N.W., Hazlett, P.W., Nicolson, J.A., Morrison, I.K., Ion leaching from a sugar maple forest in response to acidic deposition and nitrification (1989) Water, Air, and Soil Pollution, 48, pp. 251-261; Friedland, A.J., Miller, E.K., Major element cycling in a high-elevation Adirondack forest: Patterns and changes, 1986-1996 (1999) Ecological Applications, 9, pp. 958-967; Garten C.T., Jr., Huston, M.A., Thoms, C.A., Topographic variation of soil nitrogen dynamics at Walker Branch Watershed, Tennessee (1994) Forest Science, 40, pp. 497-512; Helmke, P.A., Sparks, D.L., Lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, and cesium (1996) Methods of Soils Analysis. 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    ABSTRACT = { Cloud water deposition often increases with elevation, and it is widely accepted that this cloud water increases acid loading to upland forest ecosystems. A study was undertaken in south-eastern Que?bec to determine if a 250 m elevation gradient (i.e. 420-665 m), along a uniform sugar-maple stand on the slope of Mount Orford, corresponded to a pH gradient in the forest floor and to predictable changes in soil nutrient availability and microbial properties. Precipitation data from a nearby study, and a photographic survey, provided presumptive evidence that this elevation gradient corresponded to a strong gradient in cloud water deposition. Forest floor temperature did not differ significantly across elevations. Forest floor moisture content was significantly higher, whereas pH and exchangeable Ca and Mg were significantly lower, at the higher elevations. Average seasonal net nitrification rates, determined by long-term laboratory incubations, did not differ significantly across elevations, whereas average seasonal net ammonification rates were significantly higher at higher elevations. Basal respiration rates and microbial biomass did not differ significantly across elevations, but metabolic quotient was significantly higher at higher elevations indicating possible environmental stress on forest floor microbial communities due to cloud water deposition. Anaerobic N mineralisation rates were significantly higher at higher elevations suggesting that N-limited microbial communities frequently exposed to cloud cover can be important short-term sinks for atmospheric N, thereby contributing to increase the active-N fraction of forest floors. We conclude that, where no significant changes in vegetation or temperature occur, elevation gradients can still be used to understand the spatial variability of nutrient cycles and microbial properties. © 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. },
    KEYWORDS = { Cloud deposition Elevation gradient Forest floor Microbial properties Nutrient cycling Biomass Clouds Deposition Ecosystems Environmental impact Forestry Microorganisms Nitrification Precipitation (meteorology) Soils Cloud deposition Environmental engineering atmospheric deposition cloud elevation forest floor microbial community nutrient cycling cloud nutrient cycling altitude ecology meteorological phenomena microbiology tree Canada Altitude Ecology Environmental Microbiology Meteorological Factors Trees },
    OWNER = { brugerolles },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2007.12.05 },
}

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