LafleurBradleyFrancoeur2002

Référence

Lafleur, B., Bradley, R.L. and Francoeur, A. (2002) Soil modifications created by ants along a post-fire chronosequence in lichen-spruce woodland. Ecoscience, 9(11):63-73.

Résumé

Ants appeared to be an important component of the soil fauna in azonal lichen-spruce woodland in southern Que?bec, but their role in nutrient distribution and vegetation dynamics remained unknown. A study was undertaken to compare physical, chemical, and microbial properties of nest mound soils to those of surrounding soils to test the hypothesis that ants create patches of fertile soil and that these modifications are greater than changes in soil fertility due to forest succession. We also quantified ground cover, sexually regenerated black spruce seedlings, and ant nests along the chronosequence and verified whether nest mounds constituted safe sites for black spruce seedling establishment. Surface nest mounds had a significant effect on most measured soil variables. Compared to surrounding soils, nest soils had lower moisture content and bulk density, higher organic matter content and pH, higher available C for microbial growth, higher plant-available N, and were enriched in several major nutrients (K, Ca, Mg). Extractable-P was, however, lower in nest mounds than in surrounding soils. On the other hand, age-class significantly affected fewer soil variables (moisture, microbial biomass, extractable Na, and total Ca), and these changes could be explained by fire disturbance and the subsequent development of the tree stratum. Exposed mineral soil was the dominant ground cover in the 1-year-old and 9-year-old plots, while lichen cover was dominant in the three older age-classes. Sexually regenerated black spruce seedlings occurred mainly in the sparse moss layer in the 1-year-old and 9-year-old age-classes and almost exclusively in the lichen layer in the two older age-classes. Seedling density was 15 ha-1 the year following fire disturbance, but varied between 52 and 121 ha-1 in the four older age-classes. The average densities of occupied ant nests varied between 137-188 nests ha-1 across age-classes and occured directly in lichen or moss, under bare mineral soil, in coarse woody debris, or under conspicuous sand mounds. We found no seedlings growing on occupied or abandoned nest mounds, which numbered only 15 ha-1 in the 1-year-old age-class and between 44 and 74 ha-1 in subsequent age-classes. We conclude that ants in this lichen-spruce woodland create nutrient-rich patches that can have a positive effect on tree growth and accelerate canopy closure, but we reject the hypothesis that nest mounds are safe sites for black spruce seedling establishment.

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@ARTICLE { LafleurBradleyFrancoeur2002,
    AUTHOR = { Lafleur, B. and Bradley, R.L. and Francoeur, A. },
    TITLE = { Soil modifications created by ants along a post-fire chronosequence in lichen-spruce woodland },
    JOURNAL = { Ecoscience },
    YEAR = { 2002 },
    VOLUME = { 9 },
    PAGES = { 63-73 },
    NUMBER = { 11 },
    NOTE = { 11956860 (ISSN) Cited By (since 1996): 2 Export Date: 26 April 2007 Source: Scopus Language of Original Document: English Correspondence Address: Lafleur, B.; Department of Entomology; Louisiana State University Baton Rouge, LA 70803, United States; email: blafle4@lsu.edu References: Adams, P.W., Flint, A.L., Fredriksen, R.L., Long-term patterns in soil moisture and revegetation after a clearcut of a Douglas-Fir forest in Oregon (1991) Forest Ecology and Management, 41, pp. 249-263; Anderson, J.P.E., Domsch, K.H., A physiological method for the quantitative measurement of microbial biomass in soils (1978) Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 10, pp. 215-221; Beare, M.H., Neely, C.L., Coleman, D.C., Hargrove, W.L., A substrate-induced respiration (SIR) method for measurement of fungal and bacterial biomass on plant residues (1990) Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 22, pp. 585-594; Be?ique, R., Francoeur, A., Les fourmis d'une pessie?re a? 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    ABSTRACT = { Ants appeared to be an important component of the soil fauna in azonal lichen-spruce woodland in southern Que?bec, but their role in nutrient distribution and vegetation dynamics remained unknown. A study was undertaken to compare physical, chemical, and microbial properties of nest mound soils to those of surrounding soils to test the hypothesis that ants create patches of fertile soil and that these modifications are greater than changes in soil fertility due to forest succession. We also quantified ground cover, sexually regenerated black spruce seedlings, and ant nests along the chronosequence and verified whether nest mounds constituted safe sites for black spruce seedling establishment. Surface nest mounds had a significant effect on most measured soil variables. Compared to surrounding soils, nest soils had lower moisture content and bulk density, higher organic matter content and pH, higher available C for microbial growth, higher plant-available N, and were enriched in several major nutrients (K, Ca, Mg). Extractable-P was, however, lower in nest mounds than in surrounding soils. On the other hand, age-class significantly affected fewer soil variables (moisture, microbial biomass, extractable Na, and total Ca), and these changes could be explained by fire disturbance and the subsequent development of the tree stratum. Exposed mineral soil was the dominant ground cover in the 1-year-old and 9-year-old plots, while lichen cover was dominant in the three older age-classes. Sexually regenerated black spruce seedlings occurred mainly in the sparse moss layer in the 1-year-old and 9-year-old age-classes and almost exclusively in the lichen layer in the two older age-classes. Seedling density was 15 ha-1 the year following fire disturbance, but varied between 52 and 121 ha-1 in the four older age-classes. The average densities of occupied ant nests varied between 137-188 nests ha-1 across age-classes and occured directly in lichen or moss, under bare mineral soil, in coarse woody debris, or under conspicuous sand mounds. We found no seedlings growing on occupied or abandoned nest mounds, which numbered only 15 ha-1 in the 1-year-old age-class and between 44 and 74 ha-1 in subsequent age-classes. We conclude that ants in this lichen-spruce woodland create nutrient-rich patches that can have a positive effect on tree growth and accelerate canopy closure, but we reject the hypothesis that nest mounds are safe sites for black spruce seedling establishment. },
    KEYWORDS = { Ants Black spruce Chronosequence Lichen-spruce woodland Pedoturbation Soil nutrients ant bioturbation chronosequence nest site seedling establishment soil fauna soil nutrient Canada },
    OWNER = { brugerolles },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2007.12.05 },
}

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