CrosbyBayneCummingEtAl2019

Reference

Crosby, A.D., Bayne, E.M., Cumming, S.G., Schmiegelow, F.K.A., Dénes, F.V., Tremblay, J.A. (2019) Differential habitat selection in boreal songbirds influences estimates of population size and distribution. Diversity and Distributions, 25(12):1941-1953. (Scopus )

Abstract

Aim: Most large-scale species distribution models assume spatially constant habitat selection throughout a species' geographic range. However, there is evidence this assumption may not be valid for a number of boreal bird species, which could lead to biased predictions of density and distribution in range-wide models. Our goal was to test for and quantify differential habitat selection (DHS) in songbirds among regions of the Canadian boreal forest. Location: Northern Alberta, western Ontario and southern Quebec, Canada. Methods: We used hierarchical analysis of covariance models with region-specific parameter estimates to test for differential selection of forest attributes among three regions for six boreal bird species. We used the results of these models to quantify intraspecific niche overlap between regions and compared posterior predictive accuracy to models that did not account for DHS. Results: We found a generally large standardized effect size (median effect size = 1.674) of region on selection of specific habitat variables for all six species, although there was high variability among species, variables and regional comparisons. The proportion of niche overlap between regions was generally low (mean overlap = 0.309 for all pairwise comparisons), with no spatial pattern to the overlap. Models accounting for DHS had significantly higher posterior predictive accuracy according to the Watanabe–Akaike information criterion. Main Conclusions: We found strong evidence for DHS among regions for six boreal songbird species in individual habitat attributes and overall niche space. The higher predictive accuracy of our DHS models suggests that failure to account for spatial variability in habitat selection can lead to biased estimates of density and spatial distribution. Models that did not account for DHS overestimated density relative to DHS models. We conclude that large-scale species distribution models should account for regional variation in habitat selection in order to obtain accurate estimates of population size and distribution. © 2019 The Authors. Diversity and Distributions published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd

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@ARTICLE { CrosbyBayneCummingEtAl2019,
    AUTHOR = { Crosby, A.D. and Bayne, E.M. and Cumming, S.G. and Schmiegelow, F.K.A. and Dénes, F.V. and Tremblay, J.A. },
    TITLE = { Differential habitat selection in boreal songbirds influences estimates of population size and distribution },
    JOURNAL = { Diversity and Distributions },
    YEAR = { 2019 },
    VOLUME = { 25 },
    NUMBER = { 12 },
    PAGES = { 1941-1953 },
    NOTE = { cited By 0 },
    ABSTRACT = { Aim: Most large-scale species distribution models assume spatially constant habitat selection throughout a species' geographic range. However, there is evidence this assumption may not be valid for a number of boreal bird species, which could lead to biased predictions of density and distribution in range-wide models. Our goal was to test for and quantify differential habitat selection (DHS) in songbirds among regions of the Canadian boreal forest. Location: Northern Alberta, western Ontario and southern Quebec, Canada. Methods: We used hierarchical analysis of covariance models with region-specific parameter estimates to test for differential selection of forest attributes among three regions for six boreal bird species. We used the results of these models to quantify intraspecific niche overlap between regions and compared posterior predictive accuracy to models that did not account for DHS. Results: We found a generally large standardized effect size (median effect size = 1.674) of region on selection of specific habitat variables for all six species, although there was high variability among species, variables and regional comparisons. The proportion of niche overlap between regions was generally low (mean overlap = 0.309 for all pairwise comparisons), with no spatial pattern to the overlap. Models accounting for DHS had significantly higher posterior predictive accuracy according to the Watanabe–Akaike information criterion. Main Conclusions: We found strong evidence for DHS among regions for six boreal songbird species in individual habitat attributes and overall niche space. The higher predictive accuracy of our DHS models suggests that failure to account for spatial variability in habitat selection can lead to biased estimates of density and spatial distribution. Models that did not account for DHS overestimated density relative to DHS models. We conclude that large-scale species distribution models should account for regional variation in habitat selection in order to obtain accurate estimates of population size and distribution. © 2019 The Authors. Diversity and Distributions published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd },
    AFFILIATION = { Boreal Avian Modelling Project, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada; Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada; Department of Wood and Forest Science, Laval University, Quebec City, QC, Canada; Department of Renewable Resources, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada; Sciences and Technology Branch, Environment and Climate Change Canada, Quebec City, QC, Canada },
    AUTHOR_KEYWORDS = { boreal forest; Brown Creeper; Canada Warbler; conservation; forest management; habitat selection; niche differentiation; species distribution modelling },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Article },
    DOI = { 10.1111/ddi.12991 },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85074444550&doi=10.1111%2fddi.12991&partnerID=40&md5=0498acdea0df98892e99651fbc2ce9bc },
}

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