HeYangBraeuningEtAl2019

Reference

He, M., Yang, B., Bräuning, A., Rossi, S., Ljungqvist, F.C., Shishov, V., Grießinger, J., Wang, J., Liu, J., Qin, C. (2019) Recent advances in dendroclimatology in China. Earth-Science Reviews, 194:521-535. (Scopus )

Abstract

Considerable progress has been made in dendroclimatological research in China during the period 2000–2017, including a significant increase in the spatial coverage of tree-ring chronologies developed for paleoclimatic research. New tree-ring sampling sites have been established across the Tibetan Plateau, as well as the northeastern and sub-tropical eastern parts of China. Most of the studies use coniferous trees, although different plant functional types (e.g., broadleaf species and shrubs) have also been increasingly investigated. Tree-ring chronologies longer than 600 years, however, are mostly found on the Tibetan Plateau, with the longest one extending back to 2637 BCE (before Common Era). Most tree-ring records in the eastern parts of China are <400 years long. Tree-ring width is the most commonly studied parameter, although stable isotope ratios and wood density data have also been obtained for specific sites. Stable oxygen isotope data frequently shares a common hydroclimate signal, whereas the climate or environmental signals remain inconsistent for the few available stable carbon isotope records. In general, tree-ring width-based temperature reconstructions originate from higher elevation sites (i.e., treeline) compared to hydroclimate reconstructions. Precipitation or drought reconstructions are mainly obtained from regions with an annual precipitation of <800 mm. Most of the tree-ring reconstructions are based on individual site or local-scale chronologies, although a limited number of regional-scale and field reconstructions have been produced. The most prominent identified characteristics of the recent advances in dendroclimatological research for China have manifested in aspects such as an expanded network of sampling sites, improved climate reconstruction methodology, and improved uncertainty estimations in the latter. Furthermore, the traditional statistical-based tree growth–climate relationships have been supplemented by monitoring and modeling approaches. Based on the progress from 2000 to 2017, and on the research potential of the country in this field, we expect additional widening of the dendroclimatological investigations in China during the coming years. © 2019

EndNote Format

You can import this reference in EndNote.

BibTeX-CSV Format

You can import this reference in BibTeX-CSV format.

BibTeX Format

You can copy the BibTeX entry of this reference below, orimport it directly in a software like JabRef .

@ARTICLE { HeYangBraeuningEtAl2019,
    AUTHOR = { He, M. and Yang, B. and Bräuning, A. and Rossi, S. and Ljungqvist, F.C. and Shishov, V. and Grießinger, J. and Wang, J. and Liu, J. and Qin, C. },
    TITLE = { Recent advances in dendroclimatology in China },
    JOURNAL = { Earth-Science Reviews },
    YEAR = { 2019 },
    VOLUME = { 194 },
    PAGES = { 521-535 },
    NOTE = { cited By 3 },
    ABSTRACT = { Considerable progress has been made in dendroclimatological research in China during the period 2000–2017, including a significant increase in the spatial coverage of tree-ring chronologies developed for paleoclimatic research. New tree-ring sampling sites have been established across the Tibetan Plateau, as well as the northeastern and sub-tropical eastern parts of China. Most of the studies use coniferous trees, although different plant functional types (e.g., broadleaf species and shrubs) have also been increasingly investigated. Tree-ring chronologies longer than 600 years, however, are mostly found on the Tibetan Plateau, with the longest one extending back to 2637 BCE (before Common Era). Most tree-ring records in the eastern parts of China are <400 years long. Tree-ring width is the most commonly studied parameter, although stable isotope ratios and wood density data have also been obtained for specific sites. Stable oxygen isotope data frequently shares a common hydroclimate signal, whereas the climate or environmental signals remain inconsistent for the few available stable carbon isotope records. In general, tree-ring width-based temperature reconstructions originate from higher elevation sites (i.e., treeline) compared to hydroclimate reconstructions. Precipitation or drought reconstructions are mainly obtained from regions with an annual precipitation of <800 mm. Most of the tree-ring reconstructions are based on individual site or local-scale chronologies, although a limited number of regional-scale and field reconstructions have been produced. The most prominent identified characteristics of the recent advances in dendroclimatological research for China have manifested in aspects such as an expanded network of sampling sites, improved climate reconstruction methodology, and improved uncertainty estimations in the latter. Furthermore, the traditional statistical-based tree growth–climate relationships have been supplemented by monitoring and modeling approaches. Based on the progress from 2000 to 2017, and on the research potential of the country in this field, we expect additional widening of the dendroclimatological investigations in China during the coming years. © 2019 },
    AFFILIATION = { Key Laboratory of Desert and Desertification, Northwest Institute of Eco-Environment and Resources, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou, 730000, China; Institute of Geography, Friedrich-Alexander-University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, 91058, Germany; Département des Sciences Fondamentales, Université du Québec à Chicoutimi, Chicoutimi, G7H 2B1, Canada; Key Laboratory of Vegetation Restoration and Management of Degraded Ecosystems, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Applied Botany, South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, 51065, China; Department of History, Stockholm University, Stockholm, 106 91, Sweden; Bolin Centre for Climate Research, Stockholm University, Stockholm, 106 91, Sweden; Department of Geography, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB2 3EN, United Kingdom; Mathematical Methods and Information Technology Department, Siberian Federal University, Krasnoyarsk, 660075, Russian Federation },
    AUTHOR_KEYWORDS = { China; Climate change; Dendroclimatology; Hydroclimate reconstructions; Temperature reconstructions; Tree growth },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Review },
    DOI = { 10.1016/j.earscirev.2019.02.012 },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85064518570&doi=10.1016%2fj.earscirev.2019.02.012&partnerID=40&md5=75df4ba989f5ab6effc45e2835cd0360 },
}

********************************************************** *************************** FRQNT ************************ **********************************************************

Un regroupement stratégique du

********************************************************** *********************** Infolettre *********************** **********************************************************

Abonnez-vous à
l'Infolettre du CEF!

********************************************************** ***************** Pub - Congrès Mycelium ****************** **********************************************************

Reporté en 2021

********************************************************** ***************** Pub - IWTT ****************** **********************************************************

Reporté en 2021

**********************************************************

***************** Pub - Symphonies_Boreales ****************** **********************************************************

********************************************************** ***************** Boîte à trucs *************** **********************************************************

CEF-Référence
La référence vedette !

Jérémie Alluard (2016) Les statistiques au moments de la rédaction 

  • Ce document a pour but de guider les étudiants à intégrer de manière appropriée une analyse statistique dans leur rapport de recherche.

Voir les autres...