AngersDrapeauBergeron2010

Reference

Angers, V.-A., Drapeau, P., Bergeron, Y. (2010) Snag degradation pathways of four North American boreal tree species. Forest Ecology and Management, 259(3):246-256. (Scopus )

Abstract

Many studies have highlighted the importance of deadwood, whether standing (snags) or fallen, in boreal ecosystems dynamics. However, a dearth of literature exists regarding the persistence and degradation pathways of these structures in northeastern American boreal species. Degradation pathways were examined in four tree species of the eastern boreal mixedwood and conifer forests of Canada: Trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.), balsam fir (Abies balsamea (L.) Mill.), jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb.) and black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) BSP). Sampling was conducted in unharvested forests of northwestern Québec. Discs where collected on 363 snags and logs and dendrochronological analyses conducted to determine year of death by crossdating. Survival curves were constructed for each species and degradation pathways were documented based on the shape of the relationship, lag time if applicable (time period from death to fall onset) and half-life (time required for half the stems to fall). Most species survival curves exhibited a reverse sigmoid function. Trembling aspen, jack pine and to a lesser extent balsam fir presented significant lag times before initiation of a period with high fall rates. Black spruce experienced more snag losses during the first years following death. Jack pine was clearly the most persistent species due to snags high resistance to fall and stem breakage. Within the range of tree diameters in our study area, diameter per se did not significantly influence fall probability. Differential degradation pathways of the four species translate individualistic responses that are related to species autecology. This has important implications for all ecological functions related to deadwood and should be considered when planning retention strategies of legacy trees in an ecosystem management perspective. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

EndNote Format

You can import this reference in EndNote.

BibTeX-CSV Format

You can import this reference in BibTeX-CSV format.

BibTeX Format

You can copy the BibTeX entry of this reference below, orimport it directly in a software like JabRef .

@ARTICLE { AngersDrapeauBergeron2010,
    AUTHOR = { Angers, V.-A. and Drapeau, P. and Bergeron, Y. },
    TITLE = { Snag degradation pathways of four North American boreal tree species },
    JOURNAL = { Forest Ecology and Management },
    YEAR = { 2010 },
    VOLUME = { 259 },
    PAGES = { 246-256 },
    NUMBER = { 3 },
    ABSTRACT = { Many studies have highlighted the importance of deadwood, whether standing (snags) or fallen, in boreal ecosystems dynamics. However, a dearth of literature exists regarding the persistence and degradation pathways of these structures in northeastern American boreal species. Degradation pathways were examined in four tree species of the eastern boreal mixedwood and conifer forests of Canada: Trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.), balsam fir (Abies balsamea (L.) Mill.), jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb.) and black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) BSP). Sampling was conducted in unharvested forests of northwestern Québec. Discs where collected on 363 snags and logs and dendrochronological analyses conducted to determine year of death by crossdating. Survival curves were constructed for each species and degradation pathways were documented based on the shape of the relationship, lag time if applicable (time period from death to fall onset) and half-life (time required for half the stems to fall). Most species survival curves exhibited a reverse sigmoid function. Trembling aspen, jack pine and to a lesser extent balsam fir presented significant lag times before initiation of a period with high fall rates. Black spruce experienced more snag losses during the first years following death. Jack pine was clearly the most persistent species due to snags high resistance to fall and stem breakage. Within the range of tree diameters in our study area, diameter per se did not significantly influence fall probability. Differential degradation pathways of the four species translate individualistic responses that are related to species autecology. This has important implications for all ecological functions related to deadwood and should be considered when planning retention strategies of legacy trees in an ecosystem management perspective. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. },
    COMMENT = { Export Date: 21 June 2010 Source: Scopus CODEN: FECMD doi: 10.1016/j.foreco.2009.09.026 },
    ISSN = { 03781127 (ISSN) },
    KEYWORDS = { Abies balsamea (L.) Mill., Balsam fir, Black spruce, Deadwood, Dendrochronology, Jack pine, Picea mariana (Mill.) BSP, Pinus banksiana Lamb., Populus tremuloides Michx., Snag fall, Trembling aspen, Abies balsamea, Balsam fir, Black spruce, Jack pine, Picea mariana, Pinus banksiana, Populus tremuloides, Trembling aspen, Climatology, Degradation, Ecosystems, Planning, Forestry, autecology, boreal forest, coniferous forest, dead wood, dendrochronology, ecosystem function, ecosystem management, ecosystem structure, harvesting, plantation forestry, snag, survival, treefall, Abies Amabilis, Abies Balsamea, Dead Wood, Degradation, Ecosystems, Forestry, Meteorology, Picea Mariana, Pinus Banksiana, Planning, Populus Tremuloides, Canada, Quebec [Canada], Abies, Abies balsamea, Coniferophyta, Picea mariana, Pinus banksiana, Populus tremuloides },
    OWNER = { Luc },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2010.06.21 },
    URL = { http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-73349123785&partnerID=40&md5=d813c317d6d0a3300f074b0de2770e4b },
}

********************************************************** *************************** FRQNT ************************ **********************************************************

Un regroupement stratégique du

********************************************************** ***************** Facebook Twitter *********************** **********************************************************

Abonnez-vous à
l'Infolettre du CEF!

********************************************************** ***************** Pub - ABC CBA 2020 ****************** **********************************************************

31 mai au 4 juin 2020

********************************************************** ***************** Pub - Symphonies_Boreales ****************** **********************************************************

********************************************************** ***************** Boîte à trucs *************** **********************************************************

CEF-Référence
La référence vedette !

Jérémie Alluard (2016) Les statistiques au moments de la rédaction 

  • Ce document a pour but de guider les étudiants à intégrer de manière appropriée une analyse statistique dans leur rapport de recherche.

Voir les autres...