LiuKimballParazooEtAl2020

Reference

Liu, Z., Kimball, J.S., Parazoo, N.C., Ballantyne, A.P., Wang, W.J., Madani, N., Pan, C.G., Watts, J.D., Reichle, R.H., Sonnentag, O., Marsh, P., Hurkuck, M., Helbig, M., Quinton, W.L., Zona, D., Ueyama, M., Kobayashi, H., Euskirchen, E.S. (2020) Increased high-latitude photosynthetic carbon gain offset by respiration carbon loss during an anomalous warm winter to spring transition. Global Change Biology, 26(2):682-696. (Scopus )

Abstract

Arctic and boreal ecosystems play an important role in the global carbon (C) budget, and whether they act as a future net C sink or source depends on climate and environmental change. Here, we used complementary in situ measurements, model simulations, and satellite observations to investigate the net carbon dioxide (CO2) seasonal cycle and its climatic and environmental controls across Alaska and northwestern Canada during the anomalously warm winter to spring conditions of 2015 and 2016 (relative to 2010–2014). In the warm spring, we found that photosynthesis was enhanced more than respiration, leading to greater CO2 uptake. However, photosynthetic enhancement from spring warming was partially offset by greater ecosystem respiration during the preceding anomalously warm winter, resulting in nearly neutral effects on the annual net CO2 balance. Eddy covariance CO2 flux measurements showed that air temperature has a primary influence on net CO2 exchange in winter and spring, while soil moisture has a primary control on net CO2 exchange in the fall. The net CO2 exchange was generally more moisture limited in the boreal region than in the Arctic tundra. Our analysis indicates complex seasonal interactions of underlying C cycle processes in response to changing climate and hydrology that may not manifest in changes in net annual CO2 exchange. Therefore, a better understanding of the seasonal response of C cycle processes may provide important insights for predicting future carbon–climate feedbacks and their consequences on atmospheric CO2 dynamics in the northern high latitudes. © 2019 John Wiley & Sons Ltd

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@ARTICLE { LiuKimballParazooEtAl2020,
    AUTHOR = { Liu, Z. and Kimball, J.S. and Parazoo, N.C. and Ballantyne, A.P. and Wang, W.J. and Madani, N. and Pan, C.G. and Watts, J.D. and Reichle, R.H. and Sonnentag, O. and Marsh, P. and Hurkuck, M. and Helbig, M. and Quinton, W.L. and Zona, D. and Ueyama, M. and Kobayashi, H. and Euskirchen, E.S. },
    JOURNAL = { Global Change Biology },
    TITLE = { Increased high-latitude photosynthetic carbon gain offset by respiration carbon loss during an anomalous warm winter to spring transition },
    YEAR = { 2020 },
    NOTE = { cited By 0 },
    NUMBER = { 2 },
    PAGES = { 682-696 },
    VOLUME = { 26 },
    ABSTRACT = { Arctic and boreal ecosystems play an important role in the global carbon (C) budget, and whether they act as a future net C sink or source depends on climate and environmental change. Here, we used complementary in situ measurements, model simulations, and satellite observations to investigate the net carbon dioxide (CO2) seasonal cycle and its climatic and environmental controls across Alaska and northwestern Canada during the anomalously warm winter to spring conditions of 2015 and 2016 (relative to 2010–2014). In the warm spring, we found that photosynthesis was enhanced more than respiration, leading to greater CO2 uptake. However, photosynthetic enhancement from spring warming was partially offset by greater ecosystem respiration during the preceding anomalously warm winter, resulting in nearly neutral effects on the annual net CO2 balance. Eddy covariance CO2 flux measurements showed that air temperature has a primary influence on net CO2 exchange in winter and spring, while soil moisture has a primary control on net CO2 exchange in the fall. The net CO2 exchange was generally more moisture limited in the boreal region than in the Arctic tundra. Our analysis indicates complex seasonal interactions of underlying C cycle processes in response to changing climate and hydrology that may not manifest in changes in net annual CO2 exchange. Therefore, a better understanding of the seasonal response of C cycle processes may provide important insights for predicting future carbon–climate feedbacks and their consequences on atmospheric CO2 dynamics in the northern high latitudes. © 2019 John Wiley & Sons Ltd },
    AFFILIATION = { CAS Key Laboratory of Forest Ecology and Management, Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang, China; Numerical Terradynamic Simulation Group, WA Franke College of Forestry and Conservation, University of Montana, Missoula, MT, United States; Department of Ecosystem and Conservation Sciences, WA Franke College of Forestry and Conservation, University of Montana, Missoula, MT, United States; Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, United States; Northeast Institute of Geography and Agroecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, China; Woods Hole Research Center, Falmouth, MA, United States; NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, United States; Département de géographie and Centre d'études nordiques, Université de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada; Cold Regions Research Centre, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, ON, Canada; School of Geography and Earth Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada; Global Change Research Group, Department of Biology, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA, United States; Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai, Japan; Institute of Arctic Climate and Environment Research, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Yokohama, Japan; Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, United States },
    AUTHOR_KEYWORDS = { ABoVE; boreal; carbon cycle; climate change; productivity; respiration; SMAP L4C; soil moisture; tundra },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Article },
    DOI = { 10.1111/gcb.14863 },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85074762067&doi=10.1111%2fgcb.14863&partnerID=40&md5=ce33febb9e86398044e3ee6d4e2f455e },
}

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