ThiffaultTitusMoroni2010

Reference

Thiffault, N., Titus, B.D., Moroni, M.T. (2010) Silviculture and planted species interact to influence reforestation success on a Kalmia-dominated site - a 15-year study. Forestry Chronicle, 86(2):234-242. (Scopus )

Abstract

Successful regeneration following harvesting or natural disturbance is a fundamental prerequisite for sustainable forest management. However, some regenerating stands have poor juvenile growth rates, which compromise sustainable management objectives. In particular, the presence of some ericaceous species that proliferate after forest disturbance, such as Kalmia angustifolia, can slow succession of boreal stands to the point that ecosystem retrogression is induced. We used data from a silvicultural field trial established in central Newfoundland to evaluate how various combinations of silvicultural treatments (trench scarification, herbicide application, fertilization at planting) influenced growth of three conifer species planted on a Kalmia-dominated cutover. Ground-level diameter (GLD), height, diameter at breast height (DBH), and percent Kalmia cover were assessed at the end of 15 growing seasons after planting. We detected several interactions between silvicultural treatments and planted conifer species. Globally, height and estimates of foliar biomass of all conifer species responded positively to scarification. Fifteen-year height in both scarified and unscarified treatments was in the order Picea mariana < Pinusbanksiana < Larix laricina. Black spruce and jack pine height increased when Kalmia was controlled with herbicide, but height of tamarack was not. The use of herbicide significantly increased 15-year GLD and volume index of all three conifer species, but only black spruce responded positively to fertilization at planting. Our results confirm that species-specific responses to silvicultural treatments are to be expected when managing Kalmia-dominated sites. Although chemical vegetation management has great silvicultural potential, our results suggest that mechanical site preparation can also be effective in promoting early conifer seedling growth that leads to rapid canopy closure. It is anticipated that canopy closure will lead to exclusion of Kalmia later in the rotation through natural successional pathways. Copyright © 2010 Canadian Institute Forestry / Insitut forestier du Canada.

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@ARTICLE { ThiffaultTitusMoroni2010,
    AUTHOR = { Thiffault, N. and Titus, B.D. and Moroni, M.T. },
    TITLE = { Silviculture and planted species interact to influence reforestation success on a Kalmia-dominated site - a 15-year study },
    JOURNAL = { Forestry Chronicle },
    YEAR = { 2010 },
    VOLUME = { 86 },
    PAGES = { 234-242 },
    NUMBER = { 2 },
    NOTE = { cited By 9 },
    ABSTRACT = { Successful regeneration following harvesting or natural disturbance is a fundamental prerequisite for sustainable forest management. However, some regenerating stands have poor juvenile growth rates, which compromise sustainable management objectives. In particular, the presence of some ericaceous species that proliferate after forest disturbance, such as Kalmia angustifolia, can slow succession of boreal stands to the point that ecosystem retrogression is induced. We used data from a silvicultural field trial established in central Newfoundland to evaluate how various combinations of silvicultural treatments (trench scarification, herbicide application, fertilization at planting) influenced growth of three conifer species planted on a Kalmia-dominated cutover. Ground-level diameter (GLD), height, diameter at breast height (DBH), and percent Kalmia cover were assessed at the end of 15 growing seasons after planting. We detected several interactions between silvicultural treatments and planted conifer species. Globally, height and estimates of foliar biomass of all conifer species responded positively to scarification. Fifteen-year height in both scarified and unscarified treatments was in the order Picea mariana < Pinusbanksiana < Larix laricina. Black spruce and jack pine height increased when Kalmia was controlled with herbicide, but height of tamarack was not. The use of herbicide significantly increased 15-year GLD and volume index of all three conifer species, but only black spruce responded positively to fertilization at planting. Our results confirm that species-specific responses to silvicultural treatments are to be expected when managing Kalmia-dominated sites. Although chemical vegetation management has great silvicultural potential, our results suggest that mechanical site preparation can also be effective in promoting early conifer seedling growth that leads to rapid canopy closure. It is anticipated that canopy closure will lead to exclusion of Kalmia later in the rotation through natural successional pathways. Copyright © 2010 Canadian Institute Forestry / Insitut forestier du Canada. },
    AUTHOR_KEYWORDS = { Black spruce; Fertilizer; Herbicide; Jack pine; Kalmia angustifolia; Scarification; Tamarack; Vegetation management },
    CODEN = { FRCRA },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Article },
    ISSN = { 00157546 },
    KEYWORDS = { Black spruce; Canopy closures; Conifer seedlings; Conifer species; Diameter-at-breast heights; Field trial; Foliar biomass; Forest disturbances; Ground-level; Growing season; Herbicide application; Jack pine; Juvenile growth rate; Mechanical site preparation; Natural disturbance; Newfoundlands; Picea mariana; Silvicultural treatments; Sustainable forest management; Sustainable management; Vegetation management; Volume index, Agriculture; Fertilizers; Reforestation; Revegetation; Vegetation; Weed control, Herbicides, coniferous tree; dicotyledon; environmental disturbance; fertilizer; growing season; growth rate; harvesting; herbicide; juvenile; plantation forestry; reforestation; regeneration; scarification; seedling; silviculture; stand dynamics; sustainable forestry; tree planting; vegetation cover, Agriculture; Fertilizers; Herbicides; Larix Laricina; Picea Mariana; Pinus Banksiana; Plants; Reforestation; Scarification; Weed Control, Canada; Newfoundland; Newfoundland and Labrador, Coniferophyta; Kalmia; Kalmia angustifolia; Larix; Larix laricina; Picea mariana; Pinus banksiana },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-77951904698&partnerID=40&md5=d879076a576bc4f7b039be78b65fb423 },
}

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