LaliberteSt-Laurent2020

Reference

Laliberté, J., St-Laurent, M.-H. (2020) In the wrong place at the wrong time: Moose and deer movement patterns influence wildlife-vehicle collision risk. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 135. (Scopus )

Abstract

Mitigation strategies for wildlife-vehicle collisions require sufficient knowledge about why, where and when collisions occur in order to be an efficient tool to improve public safety. Collisions with cervids are known to be influenced by spatial factors such as topography and forest cover. However, temporal changes in animal and motorist behaviors are often overlooked although they can increase the odds of cervid-vehicle collisions. Consequently, we evaluated potential factors influencing the spatiotemporal distribution of 450 collisions with moose and white-tailed deer that occurred between 1990 and 2015 along the 100-km long highway in southeastern Québec, Canada. Both spatial and temporal factors efficiently explained moose-vehicle collisions but not collisions with white-tailed deer, suggesting that the latter occurred more randomly along the highway. The risk of moose-vehicle collisions was mainly modulated by topographic and habitat variables, as the interactions between slope and elevation and slope and distance to suitable moose habitats had a strong effect on collision risk. Road sinuosity and the proportion of mature coniferous stands around the collision site positively influenced deer-vehicle collisions. A temporal increase in collision numbers was noted in different biological periods during which movement rates are known to be higher (e.g. post-winter dispersal and rut). These results suggest that cervid movement is the main factor influencing collision risk and frequency. Our results indicate that mitigation strategies aimed at decreasing the probability of collision with cervids must be species-specific and should focus more closely on animal movement. © 2019 Elsevier Ltd

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@ARTICLE { LaliberteSt-Laurent2020,
    AUTHOR = { Laliberté, J. and St-Laurent, M.-H. },
    TITLE = { In the wrong place at the wrong time: Moose and deer movement patterns influence wildlife-vehicle collision risk },
    JOURNAL = { Accident Analysis and Prevention },
    YEAR = { 2020 },
    VOLUME = { 135 },
    NOTE = { cited By 0 },
    ABSTRACT = { Mitigation strategies for wildlife-vehicle collisions require sufficient knowledge about why, where and when collisions occur in order to be an efficient tool to improve public safety. Collisions with cervids are known to be influenced by spatial factors such as topography and forest cover. However, temporal changes in animal and motorist behaviors are often overlooked although they can increase the odds of cervid-vehicle collisions. Consequently, we evaluated potential factors influencing the spatiotemporal distribution of 450 collisions with moose and white-tailed deer that occurred between 1990 and 2015 along the 100-km long highway in southeastern Québec, Canada. Both spatial and temporal factors efficiently explained moose-vehicle collisions but not collisions with white-tailed deer, suggesting that the latter occurred more randomly along the highway. The risk of moose-vehicle collisions was mainly modulated by topographic and habitat variables, as the interactions between slope and elevation and slope and distance to suitable moose habitats had a strong effect on collision risk. Road sinuosity and the proportion of mature coniferous stands around the collision site positively influenced deer-vehicle collisions. A temporal increase in collision numbers was noted in different biological periods during which movement rates are known to be higher (e.g. post-winter dispersal and rut). These results suggest that cervid movement is the main factor influencing collision risk and frequency. Our results indicate that mitigation strategies aimed at decreasing the probability of collision with cervids must be species-specific and should focus more closely on animal movement. © 2019 Elsevier Ltd },
    AFFILIATION = { Département de Biologie, Chimie et Géographie, Université du Québec à Rimouski, Centre for Northern Studies, 300 Allée des Ursulines, Rimouski, Québec G5L 3A1, Canada; Département de Biologie, Chimie et Géographie, Université du Québec à Rimouski, Centre for Northern Studies & Centre for Forest Research, 300 Allée des Ursulines, Rimouski, Québec G5L 3A1, Canada },
    ART_NUMBER = { 105365 },
    AUTHOR_KEYWORDS = { Moose (Alces americanus); Roads; White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus); Wildlife-vehicle collisions },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Article },
    DOI = { 10.1016/j.aap.2019.105365 },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85075297937&doi=10.1016%2fj.aap.2019.105365&partnerID=40&md5=48479c9557847e77f29fbe099b005902 },
}

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