TomimatsuKephartVellend2009

Reference

Tomimatsu, H., Kephart, S.R., Vellend, M. (2009) Phylogeography of Camassia quamash in western North America: Postglacial colonization and transport by indigenous peoples. Molecular Ecology, 18(18):3918-3928. (Scopus )

Abstract

Recent human activities have spread numerous plant species across the globe, yet it is unclear to what degree historical human activities influenced plant dispersal. In western North America, Camassia quamash was one of the most important food plants for indigenous peoples, who transported its propagules either intentionally or accidentally. We investigated how human and natural dispersal might have contributed to the current pattern of spatial genetic structure in C. quamash by performing phylogeographical surveys at two geographical scales. We sequenced two noncoding regions of chloroplast deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in 226 individuals from 53 populations of C. quamash as well as 126 individuals from 21 populations of the non-food plant Zigadenus venenosus. Contrary to the expectation of anthropogenic transport, C. quamash populations did not exhibit weaker genetic structure than Z. venenosus populations. We also failed to find convincing evidence for signatures of transport. Instead, our data showed strong effects of past glaciation and geographical barriers of the mountains in the Cascade Range, Olympic Peninsula and Vancouver Island. West of the Cascades, the species appears to have largely migrated northward from a southern refugium after deglaciation, whereas few populations having a highly divergent haplotype might have survived in southwestern Washington. Our data suggest that despite substantial ethnobotanical evidence for anthropogenic transport, the current pattern of genetic structure of C. quamash does not show any detectable signatures of transport by indigenous peoples and is better understood as the result of natural dispersal processes. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

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@ARTICLE { TomimatsuKephartVellend2009,
    AUTHOR = { Tomimatsu, H. and Kephart, S.R. and Vellend, M. },
    TITLE = { Phylogeography of Camassia quamash in western North America: Postglacial colonization and transport by indigenous peoples },
    JOURNAL = { Molecular Ecology },
    YEAR = { 2009 },
    VOLUME = { 18 },
    PAGES = { 3918-3928 },
    NUMBER = { 18 },
    ABSTRACT = { Recent human activities have spread numerous plant species across the globe, yet it is unclear to what degree historical human activities influenced plant dispersal. In western North America, Camassia quamash was one of the most important food plants for indigenous peoples, who transported its propagules either intentionally or accidentally. We investigated how human and natural dispersal might have contributed to the current pattern of spatial genetic structure in C. quamash by performing phylogeographical surveys at two geographical scales. We sequenced two noncoding regions of chloroplast deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in 226 individuals from 53 populations of C. quamash as well as 126 individuals from 21 populations of the non-food plant Zigadenus venenosus. Contrary to the expectation of anthropogenic transport, C. quamash populations did not exhibit weaker genetic structure than Z. venenosus populations. We also failed to find convincing evidence for signatures of transport. Instead, our data showed strong effects of past glaciation and geographical barriers of the mountains in the Cascade Range, Olympic Peninsula and Vancouver Island. West of the Cascades, the species appears to have largely migrated northward from a southern refugium after deglaciation, whereas few populations having a highly divergent haplotype might have survived in southwestern Washington. Our data suggest that despite substantial ethnobotanical evidence for anthropogenic transport, the current pattern of genetic structure of C. quamash does not show any detectable signatures of transport by indigenous peoples and is better understood as the result of natural dispersal processes. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd. },
    COMMENT = { Cited By (since 1996): 2 Export Date: 11 March 2011 Source: Scopus CODEN: MOECE doi: 10.1111/j.1365-294X.2009.04341.x },
    ISSN = { 09621083 (ISSN) },
    KEYWORDS = { Anthropogenic dispersal, Chloroplast DNA, Ethnobotany, Genetic structure, Glacial refugia, Zigadenus venenosus, chloroplast DNA, plant DNA, Agavaceae, article, DNA sequence, genetic variability, genetics, geography, haplotype, human, molecular evolution, North America, phylogeny, population dynamics, population genetics, Agavaceae, DNA, Chloroplast, DNA, Plant, Evolution, Molecular, Genetic Variation, Genetics, Population, Geography, Haplotypes, Humans, North America, Phylogeny, Population Dynamics, Sequence Analysis, DNA, Camassia, Camassia quamash, Toxicoscordion venenosum, Zigadenus },
    OWNER = { Luc },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2011.03.11 },
    URL = { http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-70349094804&partnerID=40&md5=dc0b3c83d8f5a2b4c5ee3a3e7158aece },
}

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