GowKnightBradleyEtAl2019

Reference

Gow, E.A., Knight, S.M., Bradley, D.W., Clark, R.G., Winkler, D.W., Belisle, M., Berzins, L.L., Blake, T., Bridge, E.S., Burke, L., Dawson, R.D., Dunn, P.O., Garant, D., Holroyd, G., Horn, A.G., Hussell, D.J.T., Lansdorp, O., Laughlin, A.J., Leonard, M.L., Pelletier, F., Shutler, D., Siefferman, L., Taylor, C.M., Trefry, H., Vleck, C.M., Vleck, D., Whittingham, L.A., Norris, D.R. (2019) Effects of Spring Migration Distance on Tree Swallow Reproductive Success Within and Among Flyways. Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, 7. (Scopus )

Abstract

During migration, animals may experience high rates of mortality, but costs of migration could also be manifested through non-lethal carry-over effects that influence individual success in subsequent periods of the annual cycle. Using tracking data collected from light-level geolocators, we estimated total spring migration distance (from the last wintering sites to breeding sites) of tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) within three major North American flyways. Using path analysis, we then assessed direct and indirect effects of spring migration distance on reproductive performance of individuals of both sexes. When these data were standardized by flyway, females fledged 1.3 fewer young for every 1,017 km they traveled, whereas there was no effect of migration distance on reproductive success in males. In comparison, when these data were standardized across all individuals and not by flyway, longer migrations were associated with 0.74 more young fledged for every 1,017 km traveled by females and 0.26 more young fledged for every 1,186 km migrated by males. Our results suggest that migration distance carries over to negatively influence female reproductive success within flyways but the overall positive effect of migration distance across flyways likely reflects broader life-history differences that occur among breeding populations across the tree swallow range. © Copyright © 2019 Gow, Knight, Bradley, Clark, Winkler, Bélisle, Berzins, Blake, Bridge, Burke, Dawson, Dunn, Garant, Holroyd, Horn, Hussell, Lansdorp, Laughlin, Leonard, Pelletier, Shutler, Siefferman, Taylor, Trefry, Vleck, Vleck, Whittingham and Norris.

EndNote Format

You can import this reference in EndNote.

BibTeX-CSV Format

You can import this reference in BibTeX-CSV format.

BibTeX Format

You can copy the BibTeX entry of this reference below, orimport it directly in a software like JabRef .

@ARTICLE { GowKnightBradleyEtAl2019,
    AUTHOR = { Gow, E.A. and Knight, S.M. and Bradley, D.W. and Clark, R.G. and Winkler, D.W. and Belisle, M. and Berzins, L.L. and Blake, T. and Bridge, E.S. and Burke, L. and Dawson, R.D. and Dunn, P.O. and Garant, D. and Holroyd, G. and Horn, A.G. and Hussell, D.J.T. and Lansdorp, O. and Laughlin, A.J. and Leonard, M.L. and Pelletier, F. and Shutler, D. and Siefferman, L. and Taylor, C.M. and Trefry, H. and Vleck, C.M. and Vleck, D. and Whittingham, L.A. and Norris, D.R. },
    TITLE = { Effects of Spring Migration Distance on Tree Swallow Reproductive Success Within and Among Flyways },
    JOURNAL = { Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution },
    YEAR = { 2019 },
    VOLUME = { 7 },
    NOTE = { cited By 0 },
    ABSTRACT = { During migration, animals may experience high rates of mortality, but costs of migration could also be manifested through non-lethal carry-over effects that influence individual success in subsequent periods of the annual cycle. Using tracking data collected from light-level geolocators, we estimated total spring migration distance (from the last wintering sites to breeding sites) of tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) within three major North American flyways. Using path analysis, we then assessed direct and indirect effects of spring migration distance on reproductive performance of individuals of both sexes. When these data were standardized by flyway, females fledged 1.3 fewer young for every 1,017 km they traveled, whereas there was no effect of migration distance on reproductive success in males. In comparison, when these data were standardized across all individuals and not by flyway, longer migrations were associated with 0.74 more young fledged for every 1,017 km traveled by females and 0.26 more young fledged for every 1,186 km migrated by males. Our results suggest that migration distance carries over to negatively influence female reproductive success within flyways but the overall positive effect of migration distance across flyways likely reflects broader life-history differences that occur among breeding populations across the tree swallow range. © Copyright © 2019 Gow, Knight, Bradley, Clark, Winkler, Bélisle, Berzins, Blake, Bridge, Burke, Dawson, Dunn, Garant, Holroyd, Horn, Hussell, Lansdorp, Laughlin, Leonard, Pelletier, Shutler, Siefferman, Taylor, Trefry, Vleck, Vleck, Whittingham and Norris. },
    AFFILIATION = { Department of Integrative Biology, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada; Bird Studies Canada, Delta, BC, Canada; Environment and Climate Change Canada, Saskatoon, SK, Canada; Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Museum of Vertebrates, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, United States; Département de Biologie, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC, Canada; Ecosystem Science and Management Program, University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, BC, Canada; Alaska Songbird Institute, Fairbanks, AK, United States; Oklahoma Biological Survey, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, United States; Department of Biology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada; Behavioral and Molecular Ecology Group, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI, United States; Beaverhill Bird Observatory, Edmonton, AB, Canada; Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, Peterborough, ON, Canada; Department of Biological Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada; Department of Environmental Studies, University of North Carolina Asheville, Asheville, NC, United States; Department of Biology, Acadia University, Wolfville, NS, Canada; Biology Department, Appalachian State University, Boone, NC, United States; Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA, United States; Department of Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, United States },
    ART_NUMBER = { 380 },
    AUTHOR_KEYWORDS = { geolocation; migration; migration distance; path analysis; tree swallow; young fledged },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Article },
    DOI = { 10.3389/fevo.2019.00380 },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85074326354&doi=10.3389%2ffevo.2019.00380&partnerID=40&md5=bf74ee9aabe59e73ad676d5355d6919f },
}

********************************************************** *************************** FRQNT ************************ **********************************************************

Un regroupement stratégique du

********************************************************** *********************** Infolettre *********************** **********************************************************

Abonnez-vous à
l'Infolettre du CEF!

********************************************************** ***************** Pub - Congrès Mycelium ****************** **********************************************************

Reporté en 2021

********************************************************** ***************** Pub - IWTT ****************** **********************************************************

Reporté en 2021

**********************************************************

***************** Pub - Symphonies_Boreales ****************** **********************************************************

********************************************************** ***************** Boîte à trucs *************** **********************************************************

CEF-Référence
La référence vedette !

Jérémie Alluard (2016) Les statistiques au moments de la rédaction 

  • Ce document a pour but de guider les étudiants à intégrer de manière appropriée une analyse statistique dans leur rapport de recherche.

Voir les autres...