UpretyAsselinBoonEtAl2010

Reference

Uprety, Y., Asselin, H., Boon, E.K., Yadav, S., Shrestha, K.K. (2010) Indigenous use and bio-efficacy of medicinal plants in the Rasuwa District, Central Nepal. Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, 6(1):3. (Scopus )

Abstract

Background: By revealing historical and present plant use, ethnobotany contributes to drug discovery and socioeconomic development. Nepal is a natural storehouse of medicinal plants. Although several ethnobotanical studies were conducted in the country, many areas remain unexplored. Furthermore, few studies have compared indigenous plant use with reported phytochemical and pharmacological properties.Methods: Ethnopharmacological data was collected in the Rasuwa district of Central Nepal by conducting interviews and focus group discussions with local people. The informant consensus factor (FIC) was calculated in order to estimate use variability of medicinal plants. Bio-efficacy was assessed by comparing indigenous plant use with phytochemical and pharmacological properties determined from a review of the available literature. Criteria were used to identify high priority medicinal plant species.Results: A total of 60 medicinal formulations from 56 plant species were documented. Medicinal plants were used to treat various diseases and disorders, with the highest number of species being used for gastro-intestinal problems, followed by fever and headache. Herbs were the primary source of medicinal plants (57% of the species), followed by trees (23%). The average FIC value for all ailment categories was 0.82, indicating a high level of informant agreement compared to similar studies conducted elsewhere. High FICvalues were obtained for ophthalmological problems, tooth ache, kidney problems, and menstrual disorders, indicating that the species traditionally used to treat these ailments are worth searching for bioactive compounds: Astilbe rivularis, Berberis asiatica, Hippophae salicifolia, Juniperus recurva, and Swertia multicaulis. A 90% correspondence was found between local plant use and reported plant chemical composition and pharmacological properties for the 30 species for which information was available. Sixteen medicinal plants were ranked as priority species, 13 of which having also been prioritized in a country-wide governmental classification.Conclusions: The Tamang people possess rich ethnopharmacological knowledge. This study allowed to identify many high value and high priority medicinal plant species, indicating high potential for economic development through sustainable collection and trade. © 2010 Uprety et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

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@ARTICLE { UpretyAsselinBoonEtAl2010,
    AUTHOR = { Uprety, Y. and Asselin, H. and Boon, E.K. and Yadav, S. and Shrestha, K.K. },
    TITLE = { Indigenous use and bio-efficacy of medicinal plants in the Rasuwa District, Central Nepal },
    JOURNAL = { Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine },
    YEAR = { 2010 },
    VOLUME = { 6 },
    NUMBER = { 1 },
    PAGES = { 3 },
    ABSTRACT = { Background: By revealing historical and present plant use, ethnobotany contributes to drug discovery and socioeconomic development. Nepal is a natural storehouse of medicinal plants. Although several ethnobotanical studies were conducted in the country, many areas remain unexplored. Furthermore, few studies have compared indigenous plant use with reported phytochemical and pharmacological properties.Methods: Ethnopharmacological data was collected in the Rasuwa district of Central Nepal by conducting interviews and focus group discussions with local people. The informant consensus factor (FIC) was calculated in order to estimate use variability of medicinal plants. Bio-efficacy was assessed by comparing indigenous plant use with phytochemical and pharmacological properties determined from a review of the available literature. Criteria were used to identify high priority medicinal plant species.Results: A total of 60 medicinal formulations from 56 plant species were documented. Medicinal plants were used to treat various diseases and disorders, with the highest number of species being used for gastro-intestinal problems, followed by fever and headache. Herbs were the primary source of medicinal plants (57% of the species), followed by trees (23%). The average FIC value for all ailment categories was 0.82, indicating a high level of informant agreement compared to similar studies conducted elsewhere. High FICvalues were obtained for ophthalmological problems, tooth ache, kidney problems, and menstrual disorders, indicating that the species traditionally used to treat these ailments are worth searching for bioactive compounds: Astilbe rivularis, Berberis asiatica, Hippophae salicifolia, Juniperus recurva, and Swertia multicaulis. A 90% correspondence was found between local plant use and reported plant chemical composition and pharmacological properties for the 30 species for which information was available. Sixteen medicinal plants were ranked as priority species, 13 of which having also been prioritized in a country-wide governmental classification.Conclusions: The Tamang people possess rich ethnopharmacological knowledge. This study allowed to identify many high value and high priority medicinal plant species, indicating high potential for economic development through sustainable collection and trade. © 2010 Uprety et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. },
    COMMENT = { Cited By (since 1996): 14 Export Date: 14 May 2012 Source: Scopus Art. No.: 3 doi: 10.1186/1746-4269-6-3 },
    ISSN = { 17464269 (ISSN) },
    KEYWORDS = { Astilbe, Berberis, Berberis asiatica, Hippophae rhamnoides, Hippophae salicifolia, Juniperus, Juniperus recurva, Swertia, Swertia multicaulis, plant medicinal product, angiosperm, article, attitude to health, chemistry, comparative study, ethnic and racial groups, ethnobotany, ethnopharmacology, human, information processing, interview, medicinal plant, Nepal, phytotherapy, Angiosperms, Ethnobotany, Ethnopharmacology, Focus Groups, Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice, Humans, Interviews as Topic, Nepal, Phytotherapy, Plant Preparations, Plants, Medicinal, Population Groups },
    OWNER = { Luc },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2012.05.14 },
    URL = { http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-76949090985&partnerID=40&md5=9ed91ea755b9598c8b9f55c239b7e01c },
}

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