BerningerKneeshawMessier2009b

Reference

Berninger, K., Kneeshaw, D.D., Messier, C. (2009) Effects of presenting forest simulation results on the forest values and attitudes of forestry professionals and other forest users in Central Labrador. Forest Policy and Economics, 11(2):126-133. (URL )

Abstract

This research tested whether demonstration of the long term effect of different forest management scenarios in a large forested area changes people's forest values and attitudes. Forestry professionals and other forest users in Central Labrador were shown simulation results of three alternative forest management scenarios illustrating possible long term effects on various indicators. Forest values and attitudes towards forestry were measured before and after the presentation. Our conception of values and attitudes is based on the cognitive hierarchy model of human behaviour which states that values are more enduring and more difficult to change than attitudes. It was thus hypothesized that attitudes would change but not values and that change in forestry professionals would be less than in other forest users since foresters are trained to think about long-term effects and large-scale processes of forest management scenarios. We also hypothesized that a greater number of people would have an opinion on forest management after the presentation. All three hypotheses were partially supported by the results. The results indicated that some attitude change occurred, but that values also changed somewhat. Most of the significant changes occurred when persons with no clear opinion on several forest-related questions formed an opinion. Long-term, landscape simulation results provide valuable information and enhance understanding of both forestry professionals and other forest users. However, being provided the same information, the two groups learned different things. While forest users gained more confidence in the current forest management plan and were motivated to further participate, professionals learned more specific things. This reflects differences between technical and local knowledge.

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@ARTICLE { BerningerKneeshawMessier2009b,
    AUTHOR = { Berninger, K. and Kneeshaw, D.D. and Messier, C. },
    TITLE = { Effects of presenting forest simulation results on the forest values and attitudes of forestry professionals and other forest users in Central Labrador },
    JOURNAL = { Forest Policy and Economics },
    YEAR = { 2009 },
    VOLUME = { 11 },
    PAGES = { 126-133 },
    NUMBER = { 2 },
    ABSTRACT = { This research tested whether demonstration of the long term effect of different forest management scenarios in a large forested area changes people's forest values and attitudes. Forestry professionals and other forest users in Central Labrador were shown simulation results of three alternative forest management scenarios illustrating possible long term effects on various indicators. Forest values and attitudes towards forestry were measured before and after the presentation. Our conception of values and attitudes is based on the cognitive hierarchy model of human behaviour which states that values are more enduring and more difficult to change than attitudes. It was thus hypothesized that attitudes would change but not values and that change in forestry professionals would be less than in other forest users since foresters are trained to think about long-term effects and large-scale processes of forest management scenarios. We also hypothesized that a greater number of people would have an opinion on forest management after the presentation. All three hypotheses were partially supported by the results. The results indicated that some attitude change occurred, but that values also changed somewhat. Most of the significant changes occurred when persons with no clear opinion on several forest-related questions formed an opinion. Long-term, landscape simulation results provide valuable information and enhance understanding of both forestry professionals and other forest users. However, being provided the same information, the two groups learned different things. While forest users gained more confidence in the current forest management plan and were motivated to further participate, professionals learned more specific things. This reflects differences between technical and local knowledge. },
    DOI = { DOI: 10.1016/j.forpol.2008.11.002 },
    ISSN = { 1389-9341 },
    KEYWORDS = { Attitude change },
    URL = { http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6VT4-4VDSJT6-1/2/ae337b3271b6ebf037b799647f1ddfb9 },
}

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