LemaitreFortinMontiglioEtAl2009

Reference

Lemaitre, J., Fortin, D., Montiglio, P.O., Darveau, M. (2009) Bot fly parasitism of the red-backed vole: host survival, infection risk, and population growth. Oecologia, 159(2):283-294.

Abstract

Parasites can play an important role in the dynamics of host populations, but empirical evidence remains sparse. We investigated the role of bot fly (Cuterebra spp.) parasitism in red-backed voles (Myodes gapperi) by first assessing the impacts of the parasite on the probability of vole survival under stressful conditions as well as on the reproductive activity of females. We then identified the main factors driving both the individual risk of infection and the abundance of bot flies inside red-backed voles. Finally, we evaluated the impacts of bot fly prevalence on the growth rate of vole populations between mid-July and mid-August. Thirty-six populations of red-backed voles were sampled in the boreal forest of Qu,bec, Canada. The presence and the abundance of parasites in voles, two host life history traits (sex and body condition), three indices of habitat complexity (tree basal area, sapling basal area, coarse woody debris volume), and vole abundance were considered in models evaluating the effects of bot flies on host populations. We found that the probability of survival of red-backed voles in live traps decreased with bot fly infection. Both the individual risk of infection and the abundance of bot flies in red-backed voles were driven mainly by vole abundance rather than by the two host life history traits or the three variables of habitat complexity. Parasitism had population consequences: bot fly prevalence was linked to a decrease in short-term growth rate of vole populations over the summer. We found that bot flies have the potential to reduce survival of red-backed voles, an effect that may apply to large portions of populations.

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@ARTICLE { LemaitreFortinMontiglioEtAl2009,
    AUTHOR = { Lemaitre, J. and Fortin, D. and Montiglio, P.O. and Darveau, M. },
    TITLE = { Bot fly parasitism of the red-backed vole: host survival, infection risk, and population growth },
    JOURNAL = { Oecologia },
    YEAR = { 2009 },
    VOLUME = { 159 },
    PAGES = { 283-294 },
    NUMBER = { 2 },
    MONTH = { mar },
    ABSTRACT = { Parasites can play an important role in the dynamics of host populations, but empirical evidence remains sparse. We investigated the role of bot fly (Cuterebra spp.) parasitism in red-backed voles (Myodes gapperi) by first assessing the impacts of the parasite on the probability of vole survival under stressful conditions as well as on the reproductive activity of females. We then identified the main factors driving both the individual risk of infection and the abundance of bot flies inside red-backed voles. Finally, we evaluated the impacts of bot fly prevalence on the growth rate of vole populations between mid-July and mid-August. Thirty-six populations of red-backed voles were sampled in the boreal forest of Qu,bec, Canada. The presence and the abundance of parasites in voles, two host life history traits (sex and body condition), three indices of habitat complexity (tree basal area, sapling basal area, coarse woody debris volume), and vole abundance were considered in models evaluating the effects of bot flies on host populations. We found that the probability of survival of red-backed voles in live traps decreased with bot fly infection. Both the individual risk of infection and the abundance of bot flies in red-backed voles were driven mainly by vole abundance rather than by the two host life history traits or the three variables of habitat complexity. Parasitism had population consequences: bot fly prevalence was linked to a decrease in short-term growth rate of vole populations over the summer. We found that bot flies have the potential to reduce survival of red-backed voles, an effect that may apply to large portions of populations. },
    AF = { Lemaitre, JeromeEOLEOLFortin, DanielEOLEOLMontiglio, Pierre-OlivierEOLEOLDarveau, Marcel },
    DE = { Boreal forest; Generalized linear mixed effects models; HabitatEOLEOLselection; Parasitism; Small rodents },
    DI = { 10.1007/s00442-008-1219-3 },
    KEYWORDS = { WHITE-FOOTED MOUSE; MICE PEROMYSCUS-LEUCOPUS; SMALL MAMMALS; CUTEREBRA-FONTINELLA; DEER MICE; INTERSPECIFIC COMPETITION; BODY-SIZE; ECOLOGY; MODELS; MANICULATUS },
    OWNER = { brugerolles },
    SN = { 0029-8549 },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2009.03.09 },
    UT = { ISI:000263424800004 },
}

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