DuchesneFortinCourbin2010

Reference

Duchesne, T., Fortin, D., Courbin, N. (2010) Mixed conditional logistic regressions for habitat selection studies. Journal of Animal Ecology, 79(3):548-555.

Abstract

1. Resource selection functions (RSFs) are becoming a dominant tool in habitat selection studies. RSF coefficients can be estimated with unconditional (standard) and conditional logistic regressions. While the advantage of mixed-effects models is recognized for standard logistic regression, mixed conditional logistic regression remains largely overlooked in ecological studies. 2. We demonstrate the significance of mixed conditional logistic regression for habitat selection studies. First, we use spatially explicit models to illustrate how mixed-effects RSFs can be useful in the presence of inter-individual heterogeneity in selection and when the assumption of independence from irrelevant alternatives (IIA) is violated. The IIA hypothesis states that the strength of preference for habitat type A over habitat type B does not depend on the other habitat types also available. Secondly, we demonstrate the significance of mixed-effects models to evaluate habitat selection of free-ranging bison Bison bison. 3. When movement rules were homogeneous among individuals and the IIA assumption was respected, fixed-effects RSFs adequately described habitat selection by simulated animals. In situations violating the inter-individual homogeneity and IIA assumptions, however, RSFs were best estimated with mixed-effects regressions, and fixed-effects models could even provide faulty conclusions. 4. Mixed-effects models indicate that bison did not select farmlands, but exhibited strong inter-individual variations in their response to farmlands. Less than half of the bison preferred farmlands over forests. Conversely, the fixed-effect model simply suggested an overall selection for farmlands. 5. Conditional logistic regression is recognized as a powerful approach to evaluate habitat selection when resource availability changes. This regression is increasingly used in ecological studies, but almost exclusively in the context of fixed-effects models. Fitness maximization can imply differences in trade-offs among individuals, which can yield inter-individual differences in selection and lead to departure from IIA. These situations are best modelled with mixed-effects models. Mixed-effects conditional logistic regression should become a valuable tool for ecological research.

EndNote Format

You can import this reference in EndNote.

BibTeX-CSV Format

You can import this reference in BibTeX-CSV format.

BibTeX Format

You can copy the BibTeX entry of this reference below, orimport it directly in a software like JabRef .

@ARTICLE { DuchesneFortinCourbin2010,
    AUTHOR = { Duchesne, T. and Fortin, D. and Courbin, N. },
    TITLE = { Mixed conditional logistic regressions for habitat selection studies },
    JOURNAL = { Journal of Animal Ecology },
    YEAR = { 2010 },
    VOLUME = { 79 },
    NUMBER = { 3 },
    PAGES = { 548-555 },
    ABSTRACT = { 1. Resource selection functions (RSFs) are becoming a dominant tool in habitat selection studies. RSF coefficients can be estimated with unconditional (standard) and conditional logistic regressions. While the advantage of mixed-effects models is recognized for standard logistic regression, mixed conditional logistic regression remains largely overlooked in ecological studies. 2. We demonstrate the significance of mixed conditional logistic regression for habitat selection studies. First, we use spatially explicit models to illustrate how mixed-effects RSFs can be useful in the presence of inter-individual heterogeneity in selection and when the assumption of independence from irrelevant alternatives (IIA) is violated. The IIA hypothesis states that the strength of preference for habitat type A over habitat type B does not depend on the other habitat types also available. Secondly, we demonstrate the significance of mixed-effects models to evaluate habitat selection of free-ranging bison Bison bison. 3. When movement rules were homogeneous among individuals and the IIA assumption was respected, fixed-effects RSFs adequately described habitat selection by simulated animals. In situations violating the inter-individual homogeneity and IIA assumptions, however, RSFs were best estimated with mixed-effects regressions, and fixed-effects models could even provide faulty conclusions. 4. Mixed-effects models indicate that bison did not select farmlands, but exhibited strong inter-individual variations in their response to farmlands. Less than half of the bison preferred farmlands over forests. Conversely, the fixed-effect model simply suggested an overall selection for farmlands. 5. Conditional logistic regression is recognized as a powerful approach to evaluate habitat selection when resource availability changes. This regression is increasingly used in ecological studies, but almost exclusively in the context of fixed-effects models. Fitness maximization can imply differences in trade-offs among individuals, which can yield inter-individual differences in selection and lead to departure from IIA. These situations are best modelled with mixed-effects models. Mixed-effects conditional logistic regression should become a valuable tool for ecological research. },
    OWNER = { Luc },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2010.06.29 },
}

********************************************************** ***************** Facebook Twitter *********************** **********************************************************

Abonnez-vous à
l'Infolettre du CEF!

********************************************************** ***************** Pub - Symphonies_Boreales ****************** **********************************************************

********************************************************** ***************** Boîte à trucs *************** **********************************************************

CEF-Référence
La référence vedette !

Jérémie Alluard (2016) Les statistiques au moments de la rédaction 

  • Ce document a pour but de guider les étudiants à intégrer de manière appropriée une analyse statistique dans leur rapport de recherche.

Voir les autres...