MessierCollPoitras-LariviereEtAl2009

Reference

Messier, C., Coll, L., Poitras-Lariviere, A., Belanger, N., Brisson, J. (2009) Resource and non-resource root competition effects of grasses on early- versus late-successional trees. Journal of Ecology, 97(3):548-554.

Abstract

This study assessed the effects of resource (i.e. nutrients) and non-resource (i.e. interference for space) competition from fine roots of competing grasses on the growth, morphology and architecture of fine roots of four tree species of varying successional status: Populus deltoides $ P. balsamifera (a hybrid), Betula papyrifera, Acer saccharum and Fraxinus americana. We tested the general hypothesis that tree fine-roots are affected by both below-ground resource and non-resource competition from non-self plants, and the more specific hypothesis that this effect is stronger in early-successional tree species. The experiment was conducted in split-containers where half of the roots of tree seedlings experienced either below-ground resource competition or non-resource competition, or both, by grasses while the other half experienced no competition. The late-successional tree species A. saccharum and F. americana were mostly affected by resource competition, whereas the early-successional P. deltoides $ balsamifera and B. papyrifera were strongly affected by both resource and non-resource competition. Non-resource competition reduced fine-root growth, root branching over root length (a measure of root architecture) and specific root length (a measure of root morphology) of both early-successional species. Synthesis. This study suggests that early-successional tree species have been selected for root avoidance or segregation and late-successional tree species for root tolerance of competition as mechanisms to improve below-ground resource uptake in their particular environments. It also contradicts recent studies showing perennial and annual grasses tend to overproduce roots in the presence of non-self conspecific plants. Woody plants, required to grow and develop for long periods in the presence of other plants, may react differently to non-self root competition than perennial or annual grasses that have much shorter lives.

EndNote Format

You can import this reference in EndNote.

BibTeX-CSV Format

You can import this reference in BibTeX-CSV format.

BibTeX Format

You can copy the BibTeX entry of this reference below, orimport it directly in a software like JabRef .

@ARTICLE { MessierCollPoitras-LariviereEtAl2009,
    AUTHOR = { Messier, C. and Coll, L. and Poitras-Lariviere, A. and Belanger, N. and Brisson, J. },
    TITLE = { Resource and non-resource root competition effects of grasses on early- versus late-successional trees },
    JOURNAL = { Journal of Ecology },
    YEAR = { 2009 },
    VOLUME = { 97 },
    PAGES = { 548-554 },
    NUMBER = { 3 },
    MONTH = { may },
    AF = { Messier, ChristianEOLEOLColl, LluisEOLEOLPoitras-Lariviere, AmelieEOLEOLBelanger, NicolasEOLEOLBrisson, Jacques },
    C1 = { [Messier, Christian; Poitras-Lariviere, Amelie] Univ Quebec, CEF, Dept Sci Biol, Montreal, PQ H3C 3P8, Canada.EOLEOL[Coll, Lluis] Ctr Tecnol Forestal Catalunya, Solsona 25280, Spain.EOLEOL[Belanger, Nicolas] Univ Saskatchewan, Dept Soil Sci, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A8, Canada.EOLEOL[Brisson, Jacques] Univ Montreal, Inst Rech Biol Vegetale, CEF, Dept Sci Biol, Montreal, PQ H1X 2B2, Canada. },
    DE = { fine-root competition; root architecture; root avoidance; rootEOLEOLmorphology; root nutrition; root tolerance; successional tree species },
    DI = { 10.1111/j.1365-2745.2009.01500.x },
    EM = { messier.christian@uqam.ca },
    FU = { NSERC ; PIV program of the Generalitat de Catalunya [2006PIV00021] },
    FX = { This research was supported primarily by a NSERC discovery grant toEOLEOLC.M. The article was written during a stay of C.M. in the CTFC (Spain)EOLEOLfunded by the PIV program of the Generalitat de CatalunyaEOLEOL(2006PIV00021). Thanks to B. Fontaine for help with the statisticalEOLEOLanalyses and Bill Parsons and Ronnie Drever for revision of theEOLEOLEnglish. Thanks also to B. Goetz and R. de Freitas at the University ofEOLEOLSaskatchewan laboratories for their help. },
    GA = { 431BD },
    J9 = { J ECOL },
    JI = { J. Ecol. },
    LA = { English },
    NR = { 39 },
    PA = { COMMERCE PLACE, 350 MAIN ST, MALDEN 02148, MA USA },
    PG = { 7 },
    PI = { MALDEN },
    RP = { Messier, C, Univ Quebec, CEF, Dept Sci Biol, CP 8888,Succ Ctr Ville,EOLEOLMontreal, PQ H3C 3P8, Canada. },
    SC = { Plant Sciences; Ecology },
    SN = { 0022-0477 },
    TC = { 0 },
    UT = { ISI:000265035400017 },
    ABSTRACT = { This study assessed the effects of resource (i.e. nutrients) and non-resource (i.e. interference for space) competition from fine roots of competing grasses on the growth, morphology and architecture of fine roots of four tree species of varying successional status: Populus deltoides $ P. balsamifera (a hybrid), Betula papyrifera, Acer saccharum and Fraxinus americana. We tested the general hypothesis that tree fine-roots are affected by both below-ground resource and non-resource competition from non-self plants, and the more specific hypothesis that this effect is stronger in early-successional tree species. The experiment was conducted in split-containers where half of the roots of tree seedlings experienced either below-ground resource competition or non-resource competition, or both, by grasses while the other half experienced no competition. The late-successional tree species A. saccharum and F. americana were mostly affected by resource competition, whereas the early-successional P. deltoides $ balsamifera and B. papyrifera were strongly affected by both resource and non-resource competition. Non-resource competition reduced fine-root growth, root branching over root length (a measure of root architecture) and specific root length (a measure of root morphology) of both early-successional species. Synthesis. This study suggests that early-successional tree species have been selected for root avoidance or segregation and late-successional tree species for root tolerance of competition as mechanisms to improve below-ground resource uptake in their particular environments. It also contradicts recent studies showing perennial and annual grasses tend to overproduce roots in the presence of non-self conspecific plants. Woody plants, required to grow and develop for long periods in the presence of other plants, may react differently to non-self root competition than perennial or annual grasses that have much shorter lives. },
    KEYWORDS = { SELF/NON-SELF DISCRIMINATION; SHADE TOLERANCE; PLANT; VEGETATION; ECOLOGY; COMMUNICATION; RECOGNITION; POPULATION; STRATEGIES; AVOIDANCE },
    OWNER = { sobru1 },
    PUBLISHER = { Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2009.05.01 },
}

********************************************************** ***************** Facebook Twitter *********************** **********************************************************

Abonnez-vous à
l'Infolettre du CEF!

********************************************************** ***************** Pub - Symphonies_Boreales ****************** **********************************************************

********************************************************** ***************** Boîte à trucs *************** **********************************************************

CEF-Référence
La référence vedette !

Jérémie Alluard (2016) Les statistiques au moments de la rédaction 

  • Ce document a pour but de guider les étudiants à intégrer de manière appropriée une analyse statistique dans leur rapport de recherche.

Voir les autres...