Laforest-LapointeMessierKembel2017

Reference

Laforest-Lapointe, I., Messier, C., Kembel, S.W. (2017) Tree leaf bacterial community structure and diversity differ along a gradient of urban intensity. mSystems, 2(6). (Scopus )

Abstract

Tree leaf-associated microbiota have been studied in natural ecosystems but less so in urban settings, where anthropogenic pressures on trees could impact microbial communities and modify their interaction with their hosts. Additionally, trees act as vectors spreading bacterial cells in the air in urban environments due to the density of microbial cells on aerial plant surfaces. Characterizing tree leaf bacterial communities along an urban gradient is thus key to understand the impact of anthropogenic pressures on urban tree-bacterium interactions and on the overall urban microbiome. In this study, we aimed (i) to characterize phyllosphere bacterial communities of seven tree species in urban environments and (ii) to describe the changes in tree phyllosphere bacterial community structure and diversity along a gradient of increasing urban intensity and at two degrees of tree isolation. Our results indicate that, as anthropogenic pressures increase, urban leaf bacterial communities show a reduction in the abundance of the dominant class in the natural plant microbiome, the Alphaproteobacteria. Our work in the urban environment here reveals that the structures of leaf bacterial communities differ along the gradient of urban intensity. The diversity of phyllosphere microbial communities increases at higher urban intensity, also displaying a greater number and variety of associated indicator taxa than the low and medium urban gradient sites. In conclusion, we find that urban environments influence tree bacterial community composition, and our results suggest that feedback between human activity and plant microbiomes could shape urban microbiomes. © Copyright 2017 Laforest-Lapointe et al.

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@ARTICLE { Laforest-LapointeMessierKembel2017,
    AUTHOR = { Laforest-Lapointe, I. and Messier, C. and Kembel, S.W. },
    TITLE = { Tree leaf bacterial community structure and diversity differ along a gradient of urban intensity },
    JOURNAL = { mSystems },
    YEAR = { 2017 },
    VOLUME = { 2 },
    NUMBER = { 6 },
    NOTE = { cited By 0 },
    ABSTRACT = { Tree leaf-associated microbiota have been studied in natural ecosystems but less so in urban settings, where anthropogenic pressures on trees could impact microbial communities and modify their interaction with their hosts. Additionally, trees act as vectors spreading bacterial cells in the air in urban environments due to the density of microbial cells on aerial plant surfaces. Characterizing tree leaf bacterial communities along an urban gradient is thus key to understand the impact of anthropogenic pressures on urban tree-bacterium interactions and on the overall urban microbiome. In this study, we aimed (i) to characterize phyllosphere bacterial communities of seven tree species in urban environments and (ii) to describe the changes in tree phyllosphere bacterial community structure and diversity along a gradient of increasing urban intensity and at two degrees of tree isolation. Our results indicate that, as anthropogenic pressures increase, urban leaf bacterial communities show a reduction in the abundance of the dominant class in the natural plant microbiome, the Alphaproteobacteria. Our work in the urban environment here reveals that the structures of leaf bacterial communities differ along the gradient of urban intensity. The diversity of phyllosphere microbial communities increases at higher urban intensity, also displaying a greater number and variety of associated indicator taxa than the low and medium urban gradient sites. In conclusion, we find that urban environments influence tree bacterial community composition, and our results suggest that feedback between human activity and plant microbiomes could shape urban microbiomes. © Copyright 2017 Laforest-Lapointe et al. },
    AFFILIATION = { Département des Sciences Biologiques, Université du Québec À Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada; Centre d'Étude de la Forêt, Université du Québec À Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada; Institut des Sciences de la Forêt Tempérée, Université du Québec en Outaouais, Ripon, QC, Canada; Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Department of Pediatrics, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada },
    ART_NUMBER = { e00087 },
    AUTHOR_KEYWORDS = { Biodiversity; Bioindicators; Microbial communities; Microbial ecology; Phyllosphere-inhabiting microbes; Plant-microbe interactions; Urban gradient; Urban microbiome },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Article },
    DOI = { 10.1128/mSystems.00087-17 },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85041507629&doi=10.1128%2fmSystems.00087-17&partnerID=40&md5=11f8a4d351722f4433b9b78911a9f840 },
}

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