ImbeauDrapeauMonkkonen2003

Référence

Imbeau, L., Drapeau, P. and Monkkonen, M. (2003) Are forest birds categorised as "edge species" strictly associated with edges? Ecography, 26(4):514-520.

Résumé

In recent years, studies of bird-habitat relationships undertaken in the context of habitat fragmentation have led to the widespread use of species categorisation according to their response to edge alongside mature forest patches (edge species, interior species, interior-edge generalist species). In other research contexts, especially in less fragmented landscapes dominated by a forested land base in various age classes, bird-habitat relationships are often described in relation to their use of various successional stages (early-successional species, mature forest species, generalist species). A simple comparison of these two commonly-used classifications schemes in a dose geographical range for 60 species in eastern North America as well as for 36 species in north-western Europe clearly reveals that in these two particular biomes the two classifications are not independent. We believe that this association is not only a semantic issue and has important ecological consequences. For example, almost all edge species are associated with early-successional habitats when a wide range of forest age-classes are found in a given area. Accordingly, we suggest that most species considered to prefer edge habitats in agricultural landscapes are in fact only early-successional species that could not find shrubland conditions apart from the exposed edges of mature forest fragments. To be considered a true edge species, a given species should require the simultaneous availability of more than one habitat type and consequently should be classified as a habitat generalist in its use of successional stages. However, 28 out of 30 recognised edge species were considered habitat specialists in terms of successional status. Based on these results, we conclude that "real edge species" are probably quite rare and that we should make a difference between true edge species and species which in some landscapes, happen to find their habitat requirements on edges.

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@ARTICLE { ImbeauDrapeauMonkkonen2003,
    AUTHOR = { Imbeau, L. and Drapeau, P. and Monkkonen, M. },
    TITLE = { Are forest birds categorised as "edge species" strictly associated with edges? },
    JOURNAL = { Ecography },
    YEAR = { 2003 },
    VOLUME = { 26 },
    PAGES = { 514-520 },
    NUMBER = { 4 },
    NOTE = { 09067590 (ISSN) Cited By (since 1996): 8 Export Date: 25 April 2007 Source: Scopus CODEN: ECOGE Language of Original Document: English Correspondence Address: Imbeau, L.; Chaire Indust. CRSNG-UQAT-UQAM A.; Univ. Que. en Abitibi-Temiscamingue; Module des Sci. Applique?es; 445 boul. de l'Universite? Rouyn-Noranda, Que. J9X 5E7, Canada; email: louis.imbeau@uqat.ca References: Addicott, J.F., Ecological neighbourhoods: Scaling environmental patterns (1987) Oikos, 49, pp. 340-346; Ambuel, B., Temple, S.A., Area-dependent changes in the bird communities and vegetation in southern Wisconsin forest (1983) Ecology, 64, pp. 1057-1068; Andersson, M., Central place foraging in the whinchat, Saxicola rubetra (1981) Ecology, 62, pp. 538-544; Askins, R.A., Relationship between the regional abundance of forest and the composition of forest bird communities (1987) Biol. Conserv., 39, pp. 129-152; Austen, M.J.W., Landscape context and fragmentation effects on forest birds in southern Ontario (2001) Condor, 103, pp. 701-714; Bender, D.J., Habitat loss and population decline: A meta-analysis of the patch size effect (1998) Ecology, 79, pp. 517-533; Blake, J.G., Karr, J.R., Breeding birds of isolated woodlots: Area and habitat relationships (1987) Ecology, 68, pp. 1724-1734; Brand, L.A., George, T.L., Response of passerine birds to forest edge in coast redwood forest fragments (2001) Auk, 118, pp. 678-686; Cies?lak, M., Breeding bird communities on forest edge and interior (1992) Ekol. Polska, 40, pp. 461-475; Cre?te, M., Chronose?quence apre?s feu de la diversite? de mammife?res et d'oiseaux au nord de la fore?t bore?ale que?be?coise (1995) Can. J. For. Res., 25, pp. 1509-1518; Drapeau, P., Landscape-scale disturbances and changes in bird communities of boreal mixed-wood forests (2000) Ecol. Monogr., 70, pp. 423-444; Dunning, J.B., Ecological processes that affect populations in complex landscapes (1992) Oikos, 65, pp. 169-175; Freemark, K.E., Merriam, H.G., Importance of area and habitat heterogeneity to bird assemblages in temperate forest fragments (1986) Biol. Conserv., 36, pp. 115-141; Freemark, K.E., Collins, B., Landscape ecology of birds breeding in temperate forest fragments (1992) Ecology and Conservation of Neotropical Migrant Landbirds, pp. 443-454. , Hagan III, J. M. and Johnston, D. W. (eds). Smithsonian Institution Press; Haapanen, A., Bird fauna of the Finnish forests in relation to forest succession, I (1965) Ann. Zool. Fenn., 2, pp. 153-196; Hagan, J.M., Diversity and abundance of landbirds in a northeastern industrial forest (1997) J. Wildl. Manage., 61, pp. 718-735; Hansson, L., Bird numbers across edges between mature conifer forest and clearcuts in central Sweden (1983) Ornis Scand., 14, pp. 97-103; Hansson, L., Vertebrate distributions relative to clear-cut edges in a boreal forest landscape (1994) Landscape Ecol., 9, pp. 105-115; Helle, P., Bird communities in open ground-climax forest edges in northeastern Finland (1983) Oulanka Rep., 3, pp. 39-46; Helle, P., Effects of forest regeneration on the structure of bird communities in northern Finland (1985) Holarct. Ecol., 8, pp. 120-132; Helle, P., Fuller, R.J., Migrant passerine birds in European forest successions in relation to vegetation height and geographical position (1988) J. Anim. Ecol., 57, pp. 565-579; Helle, P., Mo?nkko?nen, M., Forest successions and bird communities: Theoretical aspects and practical implications (1990) Biogeography and Ecology of Forest Bird Communities, pp. 299-318. , Keast, A. (ed.). SPB Academic; Huhta, E., Breeding success of pied flycatchers in artificial forest edges: The effects of a suboptimally shaped foraging area (1999) Auk, 116, pp. 528-535; Hunter M.L., Jr., (1990) Wildlife, Forests, and Forestry: Principles of Managing Forests for Biological Diversity, , Prentice-Hall; Imbeau, L., Comparing bird assemblages in successional black spruce stands originating from fire and logging (1999) Can. J. Zool., 77, pp. 1850-1860; Kurlavicius, P., (1995) Birds of Forest Islands in South-east Baltic Region, , Baltic ECO, Vilnius; Lambert, J.D., Hannon, S.J., Short-term effects of timber harvest on abundance, territory characteristics, and pairing success of ovenbirds in riparian buffer strips (2000) Auk, 117, pp. 687-698; Matlack, G., Litvaitis, J., Forest edges (1999) Maintaining Biodiversity in Forest Ecosystems, pp. 210-233. , Hunter, M. L. Jr (ed.). Cambridge Univ. Press; Mo?nkko?nen, M., Metsa?kasvillisuuden sukkession vaikutukset Pohois-Savon metsa?innustoon (1984) Siiveka?s, 2, pp. 41-51; Opdam, P., Bird communities in small woods in an agricultural landscape: Effects of area and isolation (1985) Biol. Conserv., 34, pp. 333-352; Orians, G.H., Pearson, N.E., On the theory of central place foraging (1979) Analysis of Ecological Systems, pp. 154-177. , Horn, D. J., Mitchell, R. D. and Stairs, G. R. (eds). Ohio State Univ. Press; Villard, M.-A., On forest-interior species, edge avoidance, area sensitivity, and dogmas in avian conservation (1998) Auk, 115, pp. 801-805; Whitcomb, R.F., Effects of forest fragmentation on avifauna of the eastern deciduous forest (1981) Forest Island Dynamics in Man-dominated Landscapes, pp. 125-205. , Burgess, R. L. and Sharpe, D. M. (eds). Springer; Yahner, R.H., Changes in wildlife communities near edges (1988) Conserv. Biol., 2, pp. 333-339. },
    ABSTRACT = { In recent years, studies of bird-habitat relationships undertaken in the context of habitat fragmentation have led to the widespread use of species categorisation according to their response to edge alongside mature forest patches (edge species, interior species, interior-edge generalist species). In other research contexts, especially in less fragmented landscapes dominated by a forested land base in various age classes, bird-habitat relationships are often described in relation to their use of various successional stages (early-successional species, mature forest species, generalist species). A simple comparison of these two commonly-used classifications schemes in a dose geographical range for 60 species in eastern North America as well as for 36 species in north-western Europe clearly reveals that in these two particular biomes the two classifications are not independent. We believe that this association is not only a semantic issue and has important ecological consequences. For example, almost all edge species are associated with early-successional habitats when a wide range of forest age-classes are found in a given area. Accordingly, we suggest that most species considered to prefer edge habitats in agricultural landscapes are in fact only early-successional species that could not find shrubland conditions apart from the exposed edges of mature forest fragments. To be considered a true edge species, a given species should require the simultaneous availability of more than one habitat type and consequently should be classified as a habitat generalist in its use of successional stages. However, 28 out of 30 recognised edge species were considered habitat specialists in terms of successional status. Based on these results, we conclude that "real edge species" are probably quite rare and that we should make a difference between true edge species and species which in some landscapes, happen to find their habitat requirements on edges. },
    KEYWORDS = { avifauna classification forest edge generalist habitat selection specialist succession },
    OWNER = { racinep },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2007.09.07 },
}

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