BurkeLevavasseurJamesEtAl2014

Référence

Burke, A., Levavasseur, G., James, P.M.A., Guiducci, D., Izquierdo, M.A., Bourgeon, L., Kageyama, M., Ramstein, G., Vrac, M. (2014) Exploring the impact of climate variability during the Last Glacial Maximum on the pattern of human occupation of Iberia. Journal of Human Evolution, 73:35-46. (Scopus )

Résumé

The Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) was a global climate event, which had significant repercussions for the spatial distribution and demographic history of prehistoric populations. In Eurasia, the LGM coincides with a potential bottleneck for modern humans and may mark the divergence date for Asian and European populations (Keinan et al., 2007). In this research, the impact of climate variability on human populations in the Iberian Peninsula during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) is examined with the aid of downscaled high-resolution (16 × 16 km) numerical climate experiments. Human sensitivity to short time-scale (inter-annual) climate variability during this key time period, which follows the initial modern human colonisation of Eurasia and the extinction of the Neanderthals, is tested using the spatial distribution of archaeological sites. Results indicate that anatomically modern human populations responded to small-scale spatial patterning in climate variability, specifically inter-annual variability in precipitation levels as measured by the standard precipitation index. Climate variability at less than millennial scale, therefore, is shown to be an important component of ecological risk, one that played a role in regulating the spatial behaviour of prehistoric human populations and consequently affected their social networks. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

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@ARTICLE { BurkeLevavasseurJamesEtAl2014,
    AUTHOR = { Burke, A. and Levavasseur, G. and James, P.M.A. and Guiducci, D. and Izquierdo, M.A. and Bourgeon, L. and Kageyama, M. and Ramstein, G. and Vrac, M. },
    TITLE = { Exploring the impact of climate variability during the Last Glacial Maximum on the pattern of human occupation of Iberia },
    JOURNAL = { Journal of Human Evolution },
    YEAR = { 2014 },
    VOLUME = { 73 },
    PAGES = { 35-46 },
    NOTE = { cited By (since 1996)0 },
    ABSTRACT = { The Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) was a global climate event, which had significant repercussions for the spatial distribution and demographic history of prehistoric populations. In Eurasia, the LGM coincides with a potential bottleneck for modern humans and may mark the divergence date for Asian and European populations (Keinan et al., 2007). In this research, the impact of climate variability on human populations in the Iberian Peninsula during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) is examined with the aid of downscaled high-resolution (16 × 16 km) numerical climate experiments. Human sensitivity to short time-scale (inter-annual) climate variability during this key time period, which follows the initial modern human colonisation of Eurasia and the extinction of the Neanderthals, is tested using the spatial distribution of archaeological sites. Results indicate that anatomically modern human populations responded to small-scale spatial patterning in climate variability, specifically inter-annual variability in precipitation levels as measured by the standard precipitation index. Climate variability at less than millennial scale, therefore, is shown to be an important component of ecological risk, one that played a role in regulating the spatial behaviour of prehistoric human populations and consequently affected their social networks. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. },
    AUTHOR_KEYWORDS = { Climate modeling; Glacial refugium; Palaeoclimate; Population distribution; Spatial analysis; Variability selection; Western Europe },
    CODEN = { JHEVA },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Article },
    DOI = { 10.1016/j.jhevol.2014.06.003 },
    ISSN = { 00472484 },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-84905734433&partnerID=40&md5=7bb429ead3ba87342e0d495b50ada027 },
}

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