WattsNataliMinionsEtAl2021

Référence

Watts, J.D., Natali, S.M., Minions, C., Risk, D., Arndt, K., Zona, D., Euskirchen, E.S., Rocha, A.V., Sonnentag, O., Helbig, M., Kalhori, A., Oechel, W., Ikawa, H., Ueyama, M., Suzuki, R., Kobayashi, H., Celis, G., Schuur, E.A.G., Humphreys, E., Kim, Y., Lee, B.-Y., Goetz, S., Madani, N., Schiferl, L.D., Commane, R., Kimball, J.S., Liu, Z., Torn, M.S., Potter, S., Wang, J.A., Jorgenson, M.T., Xiao, J., Li, X., Edgar, C. (2021) Soil respiration strongly offsets carbon uptake in Alaska and Northwest Canada. Environmental Research Letters, 16(8). (Scopus )

Résumé

Soil respiration (i.e. from soils and roots) provides one of the largest global fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere and is likely to increase with warming, yet the magnitude of soil respiration from rapidly thawing Arctic-boreal regions is not well understood. To address this knowledge gap, we first compiled a new CO2 flux database for permafrost-affected tundra and boreal ecosystems in Alaska and Northwest Canada. We then used the CO2 database, multi-sensor satellite imagery, and random forest models to assess the regional magnitude of soil respiration. The flux database includes a new Soil Respiration Station network of chamber-based fluxes, and fluxes from eddy covariance towers. Our site-level data, spanning September 2016 to August 2017, revealed that the largest soil respiration emissions occurred during the summer (June-August) and that summer fluxes were higher in boreal sites (1.87 ± 0.67 g CO2-C m-2 d-1) relative to tundra (0.94 ± 0.4 g CO2-C m-2 d-1). We also observed considerable emissions (boreal: 0.24 ± 0.2 g CO2-C m-2 d-1; tundra: 0.18 ± 0.16 g CO2-C m-2 d-1) from soils during the winter (November-March) despite frozen surface conditions. Our model estimates indicated an annual region-wide loss from soil respiration of 591 ± 120 Tg CO2-C during the 2016-2017 period. Summer months contributed to 58% of the regional soil respiration, winter months contributed to 15%, and the shoulder months contributed to 27%. In total, soil respiration offset 54% of annual gross primary productivity (GPP) across the study domain. We also found that in tundra environments, transitional tundra/boreal ecotones, and in landscapes recently affected by fire, soil respiration often exceeded GPP, resulting in a net annual source of CO2 to the atmosphere. As this region continues to warm, soil respiration may increasingly offset GPP, further amplifying global climate change. © 2021 The Author(s). Published by IOP Publishing Ltd.

Format EndNote

Vous pouvez importer cette référence dans EndNote.

Format BibTeX-CSV

Vous pouvez importer cette référence en format BibTeX-CSV.

Format BibTeX

Vous pouvez copier l'entrée BibTeX de cette référence ci-bas, ou l'importer directement dans un logiciel tel que JabRef .

@ARTICLE { WattsNataliMinionsEtAl2021,
    AUTHOR = { Watts, J.D. and Natali, S.M. and Minions, C. and Risk, D. and Arndt, K. and Zona, D. and Euskirchen, E.S. and Rocha, A.V. and Sonnentag, O. and Helbig, M. and Kalhori, A. and Oechel, W. and Ikawa, H. and Ueyama, M. and Suzuki, R. and Kobayashi, H. and Celis, G. and Schuur, E.A.G. and Humphreys, E. and Kim, Y. and Lee, B.-Y. and Goetz, S. and Madani, N. and Schiferl, L.D. and Commane, R. and Kimball, J.S. and Liu, Z. and Torn, M.S. and Potter, S. and Wang, J.A. and Jorgenson, M.T. and Xiao, J. and Li, X. and Edgar, C. },
    JOURNAL = { Environmental Research Letters },
    TITLE = { Soil respiration strongly offsets carbon uptake in Alaska and Northwest Canada },
    YEAR = { 2021 },
    NOTE = { cited By 0 },
    NUMBER = { 8 },
    VOLUME = { 16 },
    ABSTRACT = { Soil respiration (i.e. from soils and roots) provides one of the largest global fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere and is likely to increase with warming, yet the magnitude of soil respiration from rapidly thawing Arctic-boreal regions is not well understood. To address this knowledge gap, we first compiled a new CO2 flux database for permafrost-affected tundra and boreal ecosystems in Alaska and Northwest Canada. We then used the CO2 database, multi-sensor satellite imagery, and random forest models to assess the regional magnitude of soil respiration. The flux database includes a new Soil Respiration Station network of chamber-based fluxes, and fluxes from eddy covariance towers. Our site-level data, spanning September 2016 to August 2017, revealed that the largest soil respiration emissions occurred during the summer (June-August) and that summer fluxes were higher in boreal sites (1.87 ± 0.67 g CO2-C m-2 d-1) relative to tundra (0.94 ± 0.4 g CO2-C m-2 d-1). We also observed considerable emissions (boreal: 0.24 ± 0.2 g CO2-C m-2 d-1; tundra: 0.18 ± 0.16 g CO2-C m-2 d-1) from soils during the winter (November-March) despite frozen surface conditions. Our model estimates indicated an annual region-wide loss from soil respiration of 591 ± 120 Tg CO2-C during the 2016-2017 period. Summer months contributed to 58% of the regional soil respiration, winter months contributed to 15%, and the shoulder months contributed to 27%. In total, soil respiration offset 54% of annual gross primary productivity (GPP) across the study domain. We also found that in tundra environments, transitional tundra/boreal ecotones, and in landscapes recently affected by fire, soil respiration often exceeded GPP, resulting in a net annual source of CO2 to the atmosphere. As this region continues to warm, soil respiration may increasingly offset GPP, further amplifying global climate change. © 2021 The Author(s). Published by IOP Publishing Ltd. },
    AFFILIATION = { Woodwell Climate Research Center, 149 Woods Hole Rd, Falmouth, MA 02540-1644, United States; University of Alaska, Anchorage, 3211 Providence Dr, Anchorage, AK 99508, United States; St. Francis Xavier University, 4130 University Ave, Antigonish, NS, Canada; University of New Hampshire, 105 Main St, Durham, NH 03824, United States; San Diego State University, 5500 Campanile Dr, San Diego, CA 92182, United States; University of Alaska, Fairbanks, Institute of Arctic Biology, 2140 Koyukuk Dr, PO Box 757000, Fairbanks, AK 99775, United States; University of Notre Dame, 100 Galvin Life Science Center, Notre Dame, IN 46556, United States; University of Montreal, PO Box 6128, Centre-Ville STN, Montreal, QC H3C 3J7, Canada; Dalhousie University, 6310 Coburg Rd, Halifax, NS B3H 4R2, Canada; Helmholtz-Centre Potsdam, GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, Telegrafenberg, Potsdam, Telegrafenberg, 14473, Germany; Institute for Agro-Environmental Sciences, NARO, 3-1-3 Kannondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan; Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai, Japan; JAMSTEC-Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, 3172-25, Showa-machi, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan; University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, United States; Northern Arizona University, PO Box 5620, FlagstaffAZ 86011, United States; Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Dr, Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6, Canada; International Arctic Research Center (IARC), University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK 99775, United States; Korea Polar Research Institute, 26 Songdomirae-ro, Yeonsu-go, Incheon, South Korea; Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Dr, Pasadena, CA 91109, United States; Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, Palisades, NY 10964, United States; NTSG, University of Montana, ISB 415, 32 Campus Drive, Missoula, MT 59812, United States; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, 084 M/S 74R316C, 1 Cyclotron Rd, Berkeley, CA 94720, United States; University of California Irvine, Croul Hall, Irvine, CA 92697-3100, United States; Alaska Ecoscience, 2332 Cordes Way, Fairbanks, AK 99709, United States; Earth Systems Research Center, Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824, United States },
    ART_NUMBER = { 084051 },
    AUTHOR_KEYWORDS = { Arctic; boreal; carbon; climate change; CO2; ecosystem vulnerability; soil respiration },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Article },
    DOI = { 10.1088/1748-9326/ac1222 },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85112784083&doi=10.1088%2f1748-9326%2fac1222&partnerID=40&md5=323d6e031fe1213e4f5a959670cd7b9b },
}

********************************************************** *************************** FRQNT ************************ **********************************************************

Le CEF est un
regroupement stratégique du

********************************************************** *********************** Infolettre *********************** **********************************************************

Abonnez-vous à
l'Infolettre du CEF!

********************************************************** ***************** Pub - Chenilles espionnes ****************** **********************************************************

**********************************************************

***************** Pub - Symphonies_Boreales ****************** **********************************************************

********************************************************** ***************** Boîte à trucs *************** **********************************************************

CEF-Référence
La référence vedette !

  • Voici une liste (clairement incomplète) des packages R axés sur l'écologie! N'hésitez pas à ajouter à la liste

Voir les autres...