ToomeyFriedlFrolkingEtAl2015

Référence

Toomey, M., Friedl, M.A., Frolking, S., Hufkens, K., Klosterman, S., Sonnentag, O., Baldocchi, D.D., Bernacchi, C.J., Biraud, S.C., Bohrer, G., Brzostek, E., Burns, S.P., Coursolle, C., Hollinger, D.Y., Margolis, H.A., McCaughey, H., Monson, R.K., Munger, J.W., Pallardy, S., Phillips, R.P., Torn, M.S., Wharton, S., Zeri, M., Richardson, A.D. (2015) Greenness indices from digital cameras predict the timing and seasonal dynamics of canopy-scale photosynthesis. Ecological Applications, 25(1):99-115. (Scopus )

Résumé

The proliferation of digital cameras co-located with eddy covariance instrumentation provides new opportunities to better understand the relationship between canopy phenology and the seasonality of canopy photosynthesis. In this paper we analyze the abilities and limitations of canopy color metrics measured by digital repeat photography to track seasonal canopy development and photosynthesis, determine phenological transition dates, and estimate intra-annual and interannual variability in canopy photosynthesis. We used 59 site-years of camera imagery and net ecosystem exchange measurements from 17 towers spanning three plant functional types (deciduous broadleaf forest, evergreen needleleaf forest, and grassland/crops) to derive color indices and estimate gross primary productivity (GPP). GPP was strongly correlated with greenness derived from camera imagery in all three plant functional types. Specifically, the beginning of the photosynthetic period in deciduous broadleaf forest and grassland/crops and the end of the photosynthetic period in grassland/crops were both correlated with changes in greenness; changes in redness were correlated with the end of the photosynthetic period in deciduous broadleaf forest. However, it was not possible to accurately identify the beginning or ending of the photosynthetic period using camera greenness in evergreen needleleaf forest. At deciduous broadleaf sites, anomalies in integrated greenness and total GPP were significantly correlated up to 60 days after the mean onset date for the start of spring. More generally, results from this work demonstrate that digital repeat photography can be used to quantify both the duration of the photosynthetically active period as well as total GPP in deciduous broadleaf forest and grassland/crops, but that new and different approaches are required before comparable results can be achieved in evergreen needleleaf forest. � 2015 by the Ecological Society of America

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@ARTICLE { ToomeyFriedlFrolkingEtAl2015,
    AUTHOR = { Toomey, M. and Friedl, M.A. and Frolking, S. and Hufkens, K. and Klosterman, S. and Sonnentag, O. and Baldocchi, D.D. and Bernacchi, C.J. and Biraud, S.C. and Bohrer, G. and Brzostek, E. and Burns, S.P. and Coursolle, C. and Hollinger, D.Y. and Margolis, H.A. and McCaughey, H. and Monson, R.K. and Munger, J.W. and Pallardy, S. and Phillips, R.P. and Torn, M.S. and Wharton, S. and Zeri, M. and Richardson, A.D. },
    TITLE = { Greenness indices from digital cameras predict the timing and seasonal dynamics of canopy-scale photosynthesis },
    JOURNAL = { Ecological Applications },
    YEAR = { 2015 },
    VOLUME = { 25 },
    NUMBER = { 1 },
    PAGES = { 99-115 },
    NOTE = { cited By 37 },
    ABSTRACT = { The proliferation of digital cameras co-located with eddy covariance instrumentation provides new opportunities to better understand the relationship between canopy phenology and the seasonality of canopy photosynthesis. In this paper we analyze the abilities and limitations of canopy color metrics measured by digital repeat photography to track seasonal canopy development and photosynthesis, determine phenological transition dates, and estimate intra-annual and interannual variability in canopy photosynthesis. We used 59 site-years of camera imagery and net ecosystem exchange measurements from 17 towers spanning three plant functional types (deciduous broadleaf forest, evergreen needleleaf forest, and grassland/crops) to derive color indices and estimate gross primary productivity (GPP). GPP was strongly correlated with greenness derived from camera imagery in all three plant functional types. Specifically, the beginning of the photosynthetic period in deciduous broadleaf forest and grassland/crops and the end of the photosynthetic period in grassland/crops were both correlated with changes in greenness; changes in redness were correlated with the end of the photosynthetic period in deciduous broadleaf forest. However, it was not possible to accurately identify the beginning or ending of the photosynthetic period using camera greenness in evergreen needleleaf forest. At deciduous broadleaf sites, anomalies in integrated greenness and total GPP were significantly correlated up to 60 days after the mean onset date for the start of spring. More generally, results from this work demonstrate that digital repeat photography can be used to quantify both the duration of the photosynthetically active period as well as total GPP in deciduous broadleaf forest and grassland/crops, but that new and different approaches are required before comparable results can be achieved in evergreen needleleaf forest. � 2015 by the Ecological Society of America },
    AFFILIATION = { Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, HUH, 22 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge, MA, United States; Department of Earth and Environment, 685 Commonwealth Ave, Boston, MA, United States; Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space, Morse Hall, University of New Hampshire, 8 College Road, Durham, NH, United States; Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, Ghent, Belgium; D�partement de Ge�graphie, Universit� de Montre�l, Montre�l, QC, Canada; 130 Mulford Hall, Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management, University of California, Berkeley, CA, United States; Global Change and Photosynthesis Research Unit, Department of Plant Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, United States; Climate Sciences Department, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Rd, Berkeley, CA, United States; Department of Civil, Environmental and Geodetic Engineering, 417E Hitchcock Hall, Ohio State University, 2070 Neil Ave., Columbus, OH, United States; Department of Geography, Multi-disciplinary Science Building II, Indiana University, 702 N. Walnut Grove Avenue, Bloomington, IN, United States; Department of Geography, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, United States; Centre d'�tude de la For�t (CEF), Facult� de Foresteries, de Geographie, et de Ge�matique, Universit� Laval, Qu�bec City, QC, Canada; Northern Research Station, USDA Forest Service, Durham, NH, United States; Department of Geography, MacKintosh-Corry Hall, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada; School of Natural Resources and Environment Biological Sciences East, University of Arizona, Tuscon, AZ, United States; School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, United States; Department of Forestry, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, United States; Department of Biology, 247 Jordan Hall, Indiana University, 1001 E. Third St., Bloomington, IN, United States; Atmospheric, Earth and Energy Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, L-103, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, CA, United States; Centro de Ci�ncia do Sistema Terrestre, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, Cachoeira Paulista, S�o Paulo, Brazil },
    AUTHOR_KEYWORDS = { Deciduous broadleaf forest; Digital repeat photography; Evergreen needleleaf forest; Grassland; Gross primary productivity; PhenoCam; Phenology; Photosynthesis; Seasonality },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Article },
    DOI = { 10.1890/14-0005.1 },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84922032841&doi=10.1890%2f14-0005.1&partnerID=40&md5=5d6012bf5992ef718d5cbc6475c266db },
}

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