HelbigWaddingtonAlekseychikEtAl2020

Référence

Helbig, M., Waddington, J.M., Alekseychik, P., Amiro, B., Aurela, M., Barr, A.G., Black, T.A., Carey, S.K., Chen, J., Chi, J., Desai, A.R., Dunn, A., Euskirchen, E.S., Flanagan, L.B., Friborg, T., Garneau, M., Grelle, A., Harder, S., Heliasz, M., Humphreys, E.R., Ikawa, H., Isabelle, P.-E., Iwata, H., Jassal, R., Korkiakoski, M., Kurbatova, J., Kutzbach, L., Lapshina, E., Lindroth, A., Löfvenius, M.O., Lohila, A., Mammarella, I., Marsh, P., Moore, P.A., Maximov, T., Nadeau, D.F., Nicholls, E.M., Nilsson, M.B., Ohta, T., Peichl, M., Petrone, R.M., Prokushkin, A., Quinton, W.L., Roulet, N., Runkle, B.R.K., Sonnentag, O., Strachan, I.B., Taillardat, P., Tuittila, E.-S., Tuovinen, J.-P., Turner, J., Ueyama, M., Varlagin, A., Vesala, T., Wilmking, M., Zyrianov, V., Schulze, C. (2020) The biophysical climate mitigation potential of boreal peatlands during the growing season. Environmental Research Letters, 15(10). (Scopus )

Résumé

Peatlands and forests cover large areas of the boreal biome and are critical for global climate regulation. They also regulate regional climate through heat and water vapour exchange with the atmosphere. Understanding how land-atmosphere interactions in peatlands differ from forests may therefore be crucial for modelling boreal climate system dynamics and for assessing climate benefits of peatland conservation and restoration. To assess the biophysical impacts of peatlands and forests on peak growing season air temperature and humidity, we analysed surface energy fluxes and albedo from 35 peatlands and 37 evergreen needleleaf forests - the dominant boreal forest type - and simulated air temperature and vapour pressure deficit (VPD) over hypothetical homogeneous peatland and forest landscapes. We ran an evapotranspiration model using land surface parameters derived from energy flux observations and coupled an analytical solution for the surface energy balance to an atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) model. We found that peatlands, compared to forests, are characterized by higher growing season albedo, lower aerodynamic conductance, and higher surface conductance for an equivalent VPD. This combination of peatland surface properties results in a ∼20% decrease in afternoon ABL height, a cooling (from 1.7 to 2.5 °C) in afternoon air temperatures, and a decrease in afternoon VPD (from 0.4 to 0.7 kPa) for peatland landscapes compared to forest landscapes. These biophysical climate impacts of peatlands are most pronounced at lower latitudes (∼45°N) and decrease toward the northern limit of the boreal biome (∼70°N). Thus, boreal peatlands have the potential to mitigate the effect of regional climate warming during the growing season. The biophysical climate mitigation potential of peatlands needs to be accounted for when projecting the future climate of the boreal biome, when assessing the climate benefits of conserving pristine boreal peatlands, and when restoring peatlands that have experienced peatland drainage and mining. © 2020 The Author(s). Published by IOP Publishing Ltd.

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@ARTICLE { HelbigWaddingtonAlekseychikEtAl2020,
    AUTHOR = { Helbig, M. and Waddington, J.M. and Alekseychik, P. and Amiro, B. and Aurela, M. and Barr, A.G. and Black, T.A. and Carey, S.K. and Chen, J. and Chi, J. and Desai, A.R. and Dunn, A. and Euskirchen, E.S. and Flanagan, L.B. and Friborg, T. and Garneau, M. and Grelle, A. and Harder, S. and Heliasz, M. and Humphreys, E.R. and Ikawa, H. and Isabelle, P.-E. and Iwata, H. and Jassal, R. and Korkiakoski, M. and Kurbatova, J. and Kutzbach, L. and Lapshina, E. and Lindroth, A. and Löfvenius, M.O. and Lohila, A. and Mammarella, I. and Marsh, P. and Moore, P.A. and Maximov, T. and Nadeau, D.F. and Nicholls, E.M. and Nilsson, M.B. and Ohta, T. and Peichl, M. and Petrone, R.M. and Prokushkin, A. and Quinton, W.L. and Roulet, N. and Runkle, B.R.K. and Sonnentag, O. and Strachan, I.B. and Taillardat, P. and Tuittila, E.-S. and Tuovinen, J.-P. and Turner, J. and Ueyama, M. and Varlagin, A. and Vesala, T. and Wilmking, M. and Zyrianov, V. and Schulze, C. },
    JOURNAL = { Environmental Research Letters },
    TITLE = { The biophysical climate mitigation potential of boreal peatlands during the growing season },
    YEAR = { 2020 },
    NOTE = { cited By 3 },
    NUMBER = { 10 },
    VOLUME = { 15 },
    ABSTRACT = { Peatlands and forests cover large areas of the boreal biome and are critical for global climate regulation. They also regulate regional climate through heat and water vapour exchange with the atmosphere. Understanding how land-atmosphere interactions in peatlands differ from forests may therefore be crucial for modelling boreal climate system dynamics and for assessing climate benefits of peatland conservation and restoration. To assess the biophysical impacts of peatlands and forests on peak growing season air temperature and humidity, we analysed surface energy fluxes and albedo from 35 peatlands and 37 evergreen needleleaf forests - the dominant boreal forest type - and simulated air temperature and vapour pressure deficit (VPD) over hypothetical homogeneous peatland and forest landscapes. We ran an evapotranspiration model using land surface parameters derived from energy flux observations and coupled an analytical solution for the surface energy balance to an atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) model. We found that peatlands, compared to forests, are characterized by higher growing season albedo, lower aerodynamic conductance, and higher surface conductance for an equivalent VPD. This combination of peatland surface properties results in a ∼20% decrease in afternoon ABL height, a cooling (from 1.7 to 2.5 °C) in afternoon air temperatures, and a decrease in afternoon VPD (from 0.4 to 0.7 kPa) for peatland landscapes compared to forest landscapes. These biophysical climate impacts of peatlands are most pronounced at lower latitudes (∼45°N) and decrease toward the northern limit of the boreal biome (∼70°N). Thus, boreal peatlands have the potential to mitigate the effect of regional climate warming during the growing season. The biophysical climate mitigation potential of peatlands needs to be accounted for when projecting the future climate of the boreal biome, when assessing the climate benefits of conserving pristine boreal peatlands, and when restoring peatlands that have experienced peatland drainage and mining. © 2020 The Author(s). Published by IOP Publishing Ltd. },
    AFFILIATION = { School of Earth, Environment and Society, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada; Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada; Institute for Atmospheric and Earth System Research/Physics, Faculty of Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Natural Resources Institute Finland (LUKE), Bioeconomy and Environment, Helsinki, Finland; Department of Soil Science, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada; Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki, Finland; Climate Research Division, Environment and Climate Change Canada, Saskatoon, SK, Canada; Global Institute for Water Security, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada; Faculty of Land and Food Systems, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; Department of Geography, Environment, and Spatial Sciences, Michigan State UniversityMI, United States; Department of Forest Ecology and Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umea, Sweden; Department of Atmospheric Sciences and Oceanic Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, United States; Department of Earth, Environment, and Physics, Worcester State University, Worcester, MA, United States; Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, United States; Department of Biological Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, AB, Canada; Department of Geosciences and Natural Resource Management, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; Université du Québec À Montréal - Geotop, Montréal, QC, Canada; Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Geography, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada; Centre for Environmental and Climate Research, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, Carleton University, Ottawa, ON, Canada; Institute for Agro-Environmental Sciences, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization, Tsukuba, Japan; Département de Génie Civil et de Génie des Eaux, Université Laval, Quebec City, QC, Canada; Department of Environmental Science, Faculty of Science, Shinshu University, Matsumoto, Japan; A.N. Severtsov Institute of Ecology and Evolution, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russian Federation; Institute of Soil Science, University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany; Center of Environmental Dynamics and Climate Changes, Yugra State University, Khanty-Mansiysk, Russian Federation; Department of Physical Geography and Ecosystem Science, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Cold Regions Research Centre, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, ON, Canada; Institute for Biological Problems of Cryolithozone, Siberian Branch Russian Academy of Sciences, Yakutsk, Russian Federation; Graduate School of Bioagricultural Sciences, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan; Department of Geography and Environmental Management, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada; V.N. Sukachev Institute of Forest, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Krasnoyarsk, Russian Federation; Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, United States; Département de Géographie and Centre d'Études Nordiques, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada; Department of Natural Resource Sciences, McGill University, Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, QC, Canada; School of Forest Sciences, University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu, Finland; Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai, Japan; Institute for Atmospheric and Earth System Research/Forest Sciences, Faculty of Agriculture and Forestry, University of Helsinki, Finland; Institute of Botany and Landscape Ecology, University of Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany; Department of Renewable Resources, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada },
    ART_NUMBER = { 104004 },
    AUTHOR_KEYWORDS = { boreal forest; climate mitigation; energy balance; peatlands; regional climate },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Article },
    DOI = { 10.1088/1748-9326/abab34 },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85094183844&doi=10.1088%2f1748-9326%2fabab34&partnerID=40&md5=7a4e65318aa22b1ce1daea54de85afc5 },
}

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