HerathBeauseigleDhillonEtAl2016

Référence

Herath, P., Beauseigle, S., Dhillon, B., Ojeda, D.I., Bilodeau, G., Isabel, N., Gros-Louis, M.-C., Kope, H., Zeglen, S., Hamelin, R.C. and Feau, N. (2016) Anthropogenic signature in the incidence and distribution of an emerging pathogen of poplars. Biological Invasions, 18(4):1147-1161. (Scopus )

Résumé

The introduction and establishment of non-native plant pathogens into new areas can result in severe outbreaks. Septoria leaf spot and canker caused by Sphaerulina musiva is one of the most damaging poplar diseases in northeastern and north-central North America. Stem and branch cankers can be devastating on susceptible trees, leading to tree death and reduced biomass in commercial plantations. In the Pacific Northwest region of North America, the first report of the disease was made in 2006 in the Fraser Valley of British Columbia (BC), Canada. To investigate the incidence and distribution of S. musiva from its point of introduction into BC, five plantations of Populus trichocarpa (black cottonwood), 500 P. trichocarpa trees from natural populations, and 23 plantations of hybrid poplars were surveyed by using real-time PCR assays targeting S. musiva and its native sister species, S. populicola. Our survey suggests a strong anthropogenic signature to the emergence of the non-native S. musiva. Detection frequency of S. musiva was high in hybrid poplar plantations (116 trees infected, 54.2 % of the sampled trees), while detection of the native S. populicola was limited to 13.1 % (22 trees infected). By contrast, in natural stands of P. trichocarpa, less than 2 % of the trees were positive for S. musiva (7 trees) while ~75 % were positive for S. populicola (433 trees). All the S. musiva detections in natural stands of the native P. trichocarpa were from trees located in the vicinity (<2.5 km) of hybrid poplar plantations. Identification of the genotypes found in the hybrid poplar plantations revealed that they are in majority F1 progeny from P. trichocarpa × P. deltoides (T × D) (82 %) and P. nigra × P. maximowiczii (N × M) (7.8 %) crosses, which are generally susceptible (intermediate level of susceptibility between the two parental species) to the canker disease. Our results suggest that the emergence of S. musiva in BC is related to the planting of susceptible hybrid poplars. Even if the disease has not yet established itself in natural poplar populations outside of the Fraser Valley, infected plantations could act as a reservoir that could promote its spread into nearby native P. trichocarpa populations. © 2016, Springer International Publishing Switzerland.

Format EndNote

Vous pouvez importer cette référence dans EndNote.

Format BibTeX-CSV

Vous pouvez importer cette référence en format BibTeX-CSV.

Format BibTeX

Vous pouvez copier l'entrée BibTeX de cette référence ci-bas, ou l'importer directement dans un logiciel tel que JabRef .

@ARTICLE { HerathBeauseigleDhillonEtAl2016,
    AUTHOR = { Herath, P. and Beauseigle, S. and Dhillon, B. and Ojeda, D.I. and Bilodeau, G. and Isabel, N. and Gros-Louis, M.-C. and Kope, H. and Zeglen, S. and Hamelin, R.C. and Feau, N. },
    TITLE = { Anthropogenic signature in the incidence and distribution of an emerging pathogen of poplars },
    JOURNAL = { Biological Invasions },
    YEAR = { 2016 },
    VOLUME = { 18 },
    PAGES = { 1147-1161 },
    NUMBER = { 4 },
    NOTE = { cited By 1 },
    ABSTRACT = { The introduction and establishment of non-native plant pathogens into new areas can result in severe outbreaks. Septoria leaf spot and canker caused by Sphaerulina musiva is one of the most damaging poplar diseases in northeastern and north-central North America. Stem and branch cankers can be devastating on susceptible trees, leading to tree death and reduced biomass in commercial plantations. In the Pacific Northwest region of North America, the first report of the disease was made in 2006 in the Fraser Valley of British Columbia (BC), Canada. To investigate the incidence and distribution of S. musiva from its point of introduction into BC, five plantations of Populus trichocarpa (black cottonwood), 500 P. trichocarpa trees from natural populations, and 23 plantations of hybrid poplars were surveyed by using real-time PCR assays targeting S. musiva and its native sister species, S. populicola. Our survey suggests a strong anthropogenic signature to the emergence of the non-native S. musiva. Detection frequency of S. musiva was high in hybrid poplar plantations (116 trees infected, 54.2 % of the sampled trees), while detection of the native S. populicola was limited to 13.1 % (22 trees infected). By contrast, in natural stands of P. trichocarpa, less than 2 % of the trees were positive for S. musiva (7 trees) while ~75 % were positive for S. populicola (433 trees). All the S. musiva detections in natural stands of the native P. trichocarpa were from trees located in the vicinity (<2.5 km) of hybrid poplar plantations. Identification of the genotypes found in the hybrid poplar plantations revealed that they are in majority F1 progeny from P. trichocarpa × P. deltoides (T × D) (82 %) and P. nigra × P. maximowiczii (N × M) (7.8 %) crosses, which are generally susceptible (intermediate level of susceptibility between the two parental species) to the canker disease. Our results suggest that the emergence of S. musiva in BC is related to the planting of susceptible hybrid poplars. Even if the disease has not yet established itself in natural poplar populations outside of the Fraser Valley, infected plantations could act as a reservoir that could promote its spread into nearby native P. trichocarpa populations. © 2016, Springer International Publishing Switzerland. },
    AUTHOR_KEYWORDS = { Detection assay; DNA barcoding; Hybrid poplars; Mycosphaerella; Real-time PCR; Septoria canker; Tree diseases },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Article },
    DOI = { 10.1007/s10530-015-1051-8 },
    KEYWORDS = { Mycosphaerella; Populus; Populus trichocarpa; Septoria; Sphaerulina },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84957573850&partnerID=40&md5=a3bbd48c7640639935d74477a73dfdd8 },
}

********************************************************** ***************** Facebook Twitter *********************** **********************************************************

Abonnez-vous à
l'Infolettre du CEF!

********************************************************** ************* Écoles d'été et formation **************************** **********************************************************

Écoles d'été et formations

********************************************************** ***************** Pub - Symphonies_Boreales ****************** **********************************************************

********************************************************** ***************** Boîte à trucs *************** **********************************************************

CEF-Référence
La référence vedette !

Jérémie Alluard (2016) Les statistiques au moments de la rédaction 

  • Ce document a pour but de guider les étudiants à intégrer de manière appropriée une analyse statistique dans leur rapport de recherche.

Voir les autres...