GriffinSimardTurner2013

Reference

Griffin, J.M., Simard, M., Turner, M.G. (2013) Salvage harvest effects on advance tree regeneration, soil nitrogen, and fuels following mountain pine beetle outbreak in lodgepole pine. Forest Ecology and Management, 291:228-239. (Scopus )

Abstract

The extent and severity of recent native bark beetle (Dendroctonae) outbreaks in western North America have created a pressing need for forest managers to understand potential consequences of post-disturbance management. For example, post-outbreak timber harvest (i.e., salvage harvest) could alter future forest development, productivity and susceptibility to subsequent disturbance. To assess the potential for such consequences, we measured first-year effects of post-outbreak timber harvest on tree regeneration, soil nitrogen (N) availability and fuels by using a paired and replicated before-after-control-impact (BACI) experimental design with eight pairs of 0.25-ha plots in beetle-killed lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia) in Greater Yellowstone (Wyoming, USA). Post-outbreak timber harvest reduced total (live +dead) lodgepole pine basal area by 90%. Total sapling density (advance regeneration) declined by about 50% following harvest, with tall (30-140cm) saplings declining most, but mean post-harvest sapling density still exceeded 1600 stems ha-1. Relative species density was unaffected and remained dominated by lodgepole pine. Soil temperature at the litter-soil interface was warmer during summer in harvested stands, and soil NO3- concentration increased with harvest relative to untreated plots. Soil NH4+ concentration and resin bag N accumulation increased through time in all beetle-killed plots and were not affected by harvest. Following harvest, dead woody surface fuels in all size categories doubled, and canopy fuel load and canopy bulk density both were reduced; dead fuel depth, duff depth, and canopy base height did not differ between untreated and harvested plots. Harvest did reduce canopy fuels, but the natural progression of needle shedding after beetle-kill accounted for 25-40% of this total canopy fuel reduction. Salvage harvest seems unlikely to alter post-outbreak successional trajectories in these lodgepole pine forests. However, the altered fuel complex (immediate increase in dead woody surface fuels and expected long-term reduction in large-diameter fuels) in harvested plots could cause subsequent fire behavior and effects to differ between harvested and untreated stands. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

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@ARTICLE { GriffinSimardTurner2013,
    AUTHOR = { Griffin, J.M. and Simard, M. and Turner, M.G. },
    TITLE = { Salvage harvest effects on advance tree regeneration, soil nitrogen, and fuels following mountain pine beetle outbreak in lodgepole pine },
    JOURNAL = { Forest Ecology and Management },
    YEAR = { 2013 },
    VOLUME = { 291 },
    PAGES = { 228-239 },
    NOTE = { cited By 5 },
    ABSTRACT = { The extent and severity of recent native bark beetle (Dendroctonae) outbreaks in western North America have created a pressing need for forest managers to understand potential consequences of post-disturbance management. For example, post-outbreak timber harvest (i.e., salvage harvest) could alter future forest development, productivity and susceptibility to subsequent disturbance. To assess the potential for such consequences, we measured first-year effects of post-outbreak timber harvest on tree regeneration, soil nitrogen (N) availability and fuels by using a paired and replicated before-after-control-impact (BACI) experimental design with eight pairs of 0.25-ha plots in beetle-killed lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia) in Greater Yellowstone (Wyoming, USA). Post-outbreak timber harvest reduced total (live +dead) lodgepole pine basal area by 90%. Total sapling density (advance regeneration) declined by about 50% following harvest, with tall (30-140cm) saplings declining most, but mean post-harvest sapling density still exceeded 1600 stems ha-1. Relative species density was unaffected and remained dominated by lodgepole pine. Soil temperature at the litter-soil interface was warmer during summer in harvested stands, and soil NO3- concentration increased with harvest relative to untreated plots. Soil NH4+ concentration and resin bag N accumulation increased through time in all beetle-killed plots and were not affected by harvest. Following harvest, dead woody surface fuels in all size categories doubled, and canopy fuel load and canopy bulk density both were reduced; dead fuel depth, duff depth, and canopy base height did not differ between untreated and harvested plots. Harvest did reduce canopy fuels, but the natural progression of needle shedding after beetle-kill accounted for 25-40% of this total canopy fuel reduction. Salvage harvest seems unlikely to alter post-outbreak successional trajectories in these lodgepole pine forests. However, the altered fuel complex (immediate increase in dead woody surface fuels and expected long-term reduction in large-diameter fuels) in harvested plots could cause subsequent fire behavior and effects to differ between harvested and untreated stands. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. },
    AUTHOR_KEYWORDS = { Bridger-Teton National Forest; Dendroctonus ponderosae; Greater Yellowstone; Northern Rocky Mountains; Pinus contorta; Salvage logging },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Article },
    DOI = { 10.1016/j.foreco.2012.11.029 },
    KEYWORDS = { Dendroctonus ponderosae; National forests; Northern Rocky Mountains; Pinus contorta; Salvage logging; Yellowstones, Fuels; Reforestation; Sedimentary rocks; Soil pollution; Soils; Timber, Harvesting, beetle; biofuel; concentration (composition); coniferous forest; forest canopy; harvesting; pest outbreak; regeneration; soil nitrogen; soil temperature; timber harvesting, Forests; Fuels; Harvesting; Logging; Pinus Contorta; Pollution; Reforestation; Soil, North America, Coleoptera; Dendroctonus ponderosae; Pinus contorta; Pinus mugo; Scolytinae },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-84871914655&partnerID=40&md5=8894cc2a5cdbeef134ff508f353ad89d },
}

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