LecomteSimardFentonEtAl2006

Reference

Lecomte, N., Simard, M., Fenton, N.J. and Bergeron, Y. (2006) Fire severity and long-term ecosystem biomass dynamics in coniferousboreal forests of eastern Canada. Ecosystems, 9(8):1215-1230.

Abstract

The objective of this study was to characterize the effects of soilburn severity and initial tree composition on long-term forest floordynamics and ecosystem biomass partitioning within the Picea mariana[Mill.] BSP-feathermoss bioclimatic domain of northwestern Quebec.Changes in forest floor organic matter and ecosystem biomass partitioningwere evaluated along a 2,355-year chronosequence of extant stands.Dendroecological and paleoecological methods were used to determinethe time since the last fire, the soil burn severity of the lastfire (high vs. low severity), and the post-fire tree compositionof each stand (P. mariana vs. Pinus banksiana Lamb). In this paper,soil burn severity refers to the thickness of the organic matterlayer accumulated above the mineral soil that was not burned bythe last fire. In stands originating from high severity fires, thepost-fire dominance by Pinus banksiana or P. mariana had littleeffect on the change in forest floor thickness and tree biomass.In contrast, stands established after low severity fires accumulatedduring the first century after fire 73% thicker forest floors andproduced 50% less tree biomass than stands established after highseverity fires. Standing tree biomass increased until approximately100 years after high severity fires, and then decreased at a logarithmicrate in the millennial absence of fire. Forest floor thickness alsoshowed a rapid initial accumulation rate, and continued to increasein the millennial absence of fire at a much slower rate. However,because forest floor density increased through time, the overallrate of increase in forest floor biomass (58 g m-2 y-1) remainedconstant for numerous centuries after fire (700 years). Althoughyoung stands (< 200 years) have more than 60% of ecosystem biomasslocked-up in living biomass, older stands (> 200 years) sequesterthe majority (> 80%) of it in their forest floor. The results fromthis study illustrate that, under similar edaphic conditions, asingle gradient related to time since disturbance is insufficientto account for the full spectrum of ecosystem biomass dynamics occurringin eastern boreal forests and highlights the importance of consideringsoil burn severity. Although fire severity induces diverging ecosystembiomass dynamics in the short term, the extended absence of firebrings about a convergence in terms of ecosystem biomass accumulationand partitioning. © 2007 Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.

EndNote Format

You can import this reference in EndNote.

BibTeX-CSV Format

You can import this reference in BibTeX-CSV format.

BibTeX Format

You can copy the BibTeX entry of this reference below, orimport it directly in a software like JabRef .

@ARTICLE { LecomteSimardFentonEtAl2006,
    AUTHOR = { Lecomte, N. and Simard, M. and Fenton, N.J. and Bergeron, Y. },
    TITLE = { Fire severity and long-term ecosystem biomass dynamics in coniferousboreal forests of eastern Canada },
    JOURNAL = { Ecosystems },
    YEAR = { 2006 },
    VOLUME = { 9 },
    PAGES = { 1215-1230 },
    NUMBER = { 8 },
    ABSTRACT = { The objective of this study was to characterize the effects of soilburn severity and initial tree composition on long-term forest floordynamics and ecosystem biomass partitioning within the Picea mariana[Mill.] BSP-feathermoss bioclimatic domain of northwestern Quebec.Changes in forest floor organic matter and ecosystem biomass partitioningwere evaluated along a 2,355-year chronosequence of extant stands.Dendroecological and paleoecological methods were used to determinethe time since the last fire, the soil burn severity of the lastfire (high vs. low severity), and the post-fire tree compositionof each stand (P. mariana vs. Pinus banksiana Lamb). In this paper,soil burn severity refers to the thickness of the organic matterlayer accumulated above the mineral soil that was not burned bythe last fire. In stands originating from high severity fires, thepost-fire dominance by Pinus banksiana or P. mariana had littleeffect on the change in forest floor thickness and tree biomass.In contrast, stands established after low severity fires accumulatedduring the first century after fire 73% thicker forest floors andproduced 50% less tree biomass than stands established after highseverity fires. Standing tree biomass increased until approximately100 years after high severity fires, and then decreased at a logarithmicrate in the millennial absence of fire. Forest floor thickness alsoshowed a rapid initial accumulation rate, and continued to increasein the millennial absence of fire at a much slower rate. However,because forest floor density increased through time, the overallrate of increase in forest floor biomass (58 g m-2 y-1) remainedconstant for numerous centuries after fire (700 years). Althoughyoung stands (< 200 years) have more than 60% of ecosystem biomasslocked-up in living biomass, older stands (> 200 years) sequesterthe majority (> 80%) of it in their forest floor. The results fromthis study illustrate that, under similar edaphic conditions, asingle gradient related to time since disturbance is insufficientto account for the full spectrum of ecosystem biomass dynamics occurringin eastern boreal forests and highlights the importance of consideringsoil burn severity. Although fire severity induces diverging ecosystembiomass dynamics in the short term, the extended absence of firebrings about a convergence in terms of ecosystem biomass accumulationand partitioning. © 2007 Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. },
    KEYWORDS = { Biomass accumulation Biomass partitioning Black spruce (Picea mariana)Chronosequence Ecological convergence Fire disturbance Forest floororganic matter Forest succession Jack pine (Pinus banksiana) Soilburn severity },
    OWNER = { brugerolles },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2007.12.04 },
}

********************************************************** ***************** Facebook Twitter *********************** **********************************************************

Abonnez-vous à
l'Infolettre du CEF!

********************************************************** ************* Écoles d'été et formation **************************** **********************************************************

Écoles d'été et formations

Ecole d'été en Biologie et Ecologie intégratives 
6-12 juillet 2019, Pyrénées françaises
École d'été en modélisation de la biodiversité 
19-23 août 2019, Orford
Cours aux cycles supérieurs: Aménagement des écosystèmes forestiers 
19-30 août 2019, Station FERLD

********************************************************** ***************** Pub - Symphonies_Boreales ****************** **********************************************************

********************************************************** ***************** Boîte à trucs *************** **********************************************************

CEF-Référence
La référence vedette !

Jérémie Alluard (2016) Les statistiques au moments de la rédaction 

  • Ce document a pour but de guider les étudiants à intégrer de manière appropriée une analyse statistique dans leur rapport de recherche.

Voir les autres...