VellendLitrico2008

Référence

Vellend, M., Litrico, I. (2008) Sex and space destabilize intransitive competition within and between species. Proceedings of the Royal Society B-Biological Sciences, 275(1645):1857-1864. (Scopus )

Résumé

Organisms ranging from bacteria and corals to plants and vertebrates can form intransitive competitive networks, in which coexistence can be maintained because no one species or genotype is superior to all others. However, in the simplest case with three competing types, the long-term outcome may not be so clear if two of the three represent the ends of a continuous heritable trait distribution within one species, as has been recently demonstrated empirically in a short-term experiment with plants. Using simulation models of this scenario, results with asexual reproduction confirm previous studies which showed that local interactions promote coexistence. However, with sexual reproduction, genetic variance is reduced because selection fluctuates between favouring the two extremes during population cycles, while sex continually produces intermediates. Sex thus slows the response to selection when it is the strongest and therefore slows the recovery from extreme abundances, creating larger abundance fluctuations. Local interactions do not stabilize dynamics with sex because the resultant spatial patches of one species are genetically heterogeneous, such that particular phenotypes do not benefit from spatial refuges. In sharp contrast to previous models suggesting that sex or local interactions stabilize population dynamics, here sex and local interactions destabilize dynamics and increase extinction risk. © 2008 The Royal Society.

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@ARTICLE { VellendLitrico2008,
    AUTHOR = { Vellend, M. and Litrico, I. },
    TITLE = { Sex and space destabilize intransitive competition within and between species },
    JOURNAL = { Proceedings of the Royal Society B-Biological Sciences },
    YEAR = { 2008 },
    VOLUME = { 275 },
    PAGES = { 1857-1864 },
    NUMBER = { 1645 },
    ABSTRACT = { Organisms ranging from bacteria and corals to plants and vertebrates can form intransitive competitive networks, in which coexistence can be maintained because no one species or genotype is superior to all others. However, in the simplest case with three competing types, the long-term outcome may not be so clear if two of the three represent the ends of a continuous heritable trait distribution within one species, as has been recently demonstrated empirically in a short-term experiment with plants. Using simulation models of this scenario, results with asexual reproduction confirm previous studies which showed that local interactions promote coexistence. However, with sexual reproduction, genetic variance is reduced because selection fluctuates between favouring the two extremes during population cycles, while sex continually produces intermediates. Sex thus slows the response to selection when it is the strongest and therefore slows the recovery from extreme abundances, creating larger abundance fluctuations. Local interactions do not stabilize dynamics with sex because the resultant spatial patches of one species are genetically heterogeneous, such that particular phenotypes do not benefit from spatial refuges. In sharp contrast to previous models suggesting that sex or local interactions stabilize population dynamics, here sex and local interactions destabilize dynamics and increase extinction risk. © 2008 The Royal Society. },
    COMMENT = { Cited By (since 1996): 2 Export Date: 11 March 2011 Source: Scopus CODEN: PRLBA doi: 10.1098/rspb.2008.0402 },
    ISSN = { 09628452 (ISSN) },
    KEYWORDS = { Genetic diversity, Intransitive competition, Rock-paper-scissors, Sexual reproduction, Space, Species coexistence, asexual reproduction, coexistence, ecological modeling, genetic variation, heterogeneity, interspecific competition, population cycle, population dynamics, sexual selection, article, asexual reproduction, competition, evolution, fitness, genetic variability, host parasite interaction, nonhuman, phenotype, population abundance, predator prey interaction, priority journal, reproduction, species coexistence, species extinction, Animals, Competitive Behavior, Computer Simulation, Models, Biological, Phenotype, Population Dynamics, Reproduction, Asexual, Variation (Genetics), Anthozoa, Vertebrata },
    OWNER = { Luc },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2011.03.11 },
    URL = { http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-46249091380&partnerID=40&md5=0dd2b9acdd37d8d776077d1d7b3f34f3 },
}

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