BowlerBjorkmanDornelasEtAl2020

Référence

Bowler, D.E., Bjorkman, A.D., Dornelas, M., Myers-Smith, I.H., Navarro, L.M., Niamir, A., Supp, S.R., Waldock, C., Winter, M., Vellend, M., Blowes, S.A., Böhning-Gaese, K., Bruelheide, H., Elahi, R., Antão, L.H., Hines, J., Isbell, F., Jones, H.P., Magurran, A.E., Cabral, J.S., Bates, A.E. (2020) Mapping human pressures on biodiversity across the planet uncovers anthropogenic threat complexes. People and Nature, 2(2):380-394. (Scopus )

Résumé

Climate change and other anthropogenic drivers of biodiversity change are unequally distributed across the world. Overlap in the distributions of different drivers have important implications for biodiversity change attribution and the potential for interactive effects. However, the spatial relationships among different drivers and whether they differ between the terrestrial and marine realm has yet to be examined. We compiled global gridded datasets on climate change, land-use, resource exploitation, pollution, alien species potential and human population density. We used multivariate statistics to examine the spatial relationships among the drivers and to characterize the typical combinations of drivers experienced by different regions of the world. We found stronger positive correlations among drivers in the terrestrial than in the marine realm, leading to areas with high intensities of multiple drivers on land. Climate change tended to be negatively correlated with other drivers in the terrestrial realm (e.g. in the tundra and boreal forest with high climate change but low human use and pollution), whereas the opposite was true in the marine realm (e.g. in the Indo-Pacific with high climate change and high fishing). We show that different regions of the world can be defined by Anthropogenic Threat Complexes (ATCs), distinguished by different sets of drivers with varying intensities. We identify 11 ATCs that can be used to test hypotheses about patterns of biodiversity and ecosystem change, especially about the joint effects of multiple drivers. Our global analysis highlights the broad conservation priorities needed to mitigate the impacts of anthropogenic change, with different priorities emerging on land and in the ocean, and in different parts of the world. © 2020 The Authors. People and Nature published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Ecological Society

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@ARTICLE { BowlerBjorkmanDornelasEtAl2020,
    AUTHOR = { Bowler, D.E. and Bjorkman, A.D. and Dornelas, M. and Myers-Smith, I.H. and Navarro, L.M. and Niamir, A. and Supp, S.R. and Waldock, C. and Winter, M. and Vellend, M. and Blowes, S.A. and Böhning-Gaese, K. and Bruelheide, H. and Elahi, R. and Antão, L.H. and Hines, J. and Isbell, F. and Jones, H.P. and Magurran, A.E. and Cabral, J.S. and Bates, A.E. },
    JOURNAL = { People and Nature },
    TITLE = { Mapping human pressures on biodiversity across the planet uncovers anthropogenic threat complexes },
    YEAR = { 2020 },
    NOTE = { cited By 23 },
    NUMBER = { 2 },
    PAGES = { 380-394 },
    VOLUME = { 2 },
    ABSTRACT = { Climate change and other anthropogenic drivers of biodiversity change are unequally distributed across the world. Overlap in the distributions of different drivers have important implications for biodiversity change attribution and the potential for interactive effects. However, the spatial relationships among different drivers and whether they differ between the terrestrial and marine realm has yet to be examined. We compiled global gridded datasets on climate change, land-use, resource exploitation, pollution, alien species potential and human population density. We used multivariate statistics to examine the spatial relationships among the drivers and to characterize the typical combinations of drivers experienced by different regions of the world. We found stronger positive correlations among drivers in the terrestrial than in the marine realm, leading to areas with high intensities of multiple drivers on land. Climate change tended to be negatively correlated with other drivers in the terrestrial realm (e.g. in the tundra and boreal forest with high climate change but low human use and pollution), whereas the opposite was true in the marine realm (e.g. in the Indo-Pacific with high climate change and high fishing). We show that different regions of the world can be defined by Anthropogenic Threat Complexes (ATCs), distinguished by different sets of drivers with varying intensities. We identify 11 ATCs that can be used to test hypotheses about patterns of biodiversity and ecosystem change, especially about the joint effects of multiple drivers. Our global analysis highlights the broad conservation priorities needed to mitigate the impacts of anthropogenic change, with different priorities emerging on land and in the ocean, and in different parts of the world. © 2020 The Authors. People and Nature published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Ecological Society },
    AFFILIATION = { Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre, Frankfurt am Main, Germany; German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany; Institute of Biodiversity, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Jena, Germany; Department of Ecosystem Services, UFZ – Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig, Germany; Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Gothenburg Global Biodiversity Centre, Gothenburg, Sweden; Centre for Biological Diversity, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, United Kingdom; School of GeoSciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom; Institute of Biology/Geobotany and Botanical Garden, Martin Luther University Halle–Wittenberg, Halle, Germany; Data Analytics Program, Denison University, Granville, OH, United States; Ocean and Earth Science, National Oceanography Centre Southampton, University of Southampton, Southampton, United Kingdom; Leipzig University, Leipzig, Germany; Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC, Canada; Department of Computer Science, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Salle), Germany, Israel; Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University, Pacific Grove, CA, United States; Department of Biology and CESAM, Universidade de Aveiro, Aveiro, Portugal; Research Centre for Ecological Change, Organismal and Evolutionary Biology Research Programme, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Institute of Biology, Leipzig University, Leipzig, Germany; Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, University of Minnesota Twin Cities, Saint Paul, MN, United States; Department of Biological Sciences and Institute for the Study of the Environment, Sustainability, and Energy, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL, United States; Ecosystem Modeling, Centre for Computational and Theoretical Biology, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany; Department of Ocean Sciences, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, NL, Canada },
    AUTHOR_KEYWORDS = { Anthropocene; biodiversity threats; direct drivers; global change },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Article },
    DOI = { 10.1002/pan3.10071 },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85083494850&doi=10.1002%2fpan3.10071&partnerID=40&md5=19e3c736d4b84a1cdfe0d6e908cd11d3 },
}

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