O'Brien200670

Référence

O'Brien, D., Manseau, M., Fall, A., Fortin, M.-J. (2006) Testing the importance of spatial configuration of winter habitat for woodland caribou: An application of graph theory. Biological Conservation, 130(1):70-83. (Scopus )

Résumé

Conservation of remaining woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou) populations requires land management strategies that not only maintain caribou habitat, but also favour habitat connectivity. This study presents and field tests graph theory-based measures of landscape connectivity, and demonstrate an association between the distribution of woodland caribou and well-connected winter habitat. Cost values for the intervening land cover types were determined based on the probability of selection relative to high-quality winter habitat. Habitat connectivity was then represented by linking high-quality habitat patches along least-cost paths through this parameterized cost surface. A randomization procedure was used to assess the animal's association with habitat connected at increasing distance thresholds to identify appropriate scales of response. A strong relationship was obtained between large clusters of high-quality winter habitat patches and winter GPS telemetry location points (November 1-March 15) from two woodland caribou herds in Manitoba, Canada. This relationship was stronger when only late winter location points (January 1-March 15) were used. Our results highlight the importance of accounting for the spatial configuration of habitat on the landscape and the intervening land cover types when assessing range quality for woodland caribou. They also provide support for the use of graph theory to assist in identifying core activity areas for woodland caribou and key linkages between these areas and other parts of the landscape. © 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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@ARTICLE { O'Brien200670,
    AUTHOR = { O'Brien, D. and Manseau, M. and Fall, A. and Fortin, M.-J. },
    TITLE = { Testing the importance of spatial configuration of winter habitat for woodland caribou: An application of graph theory },
    JOURNAL = { Biological Conservation },
    YEAR = { 2006 },
    VOLUME = { 130 },
    NUMBER = { 1 },
    PAGES = { 70-83 },
    NOTE = { cited By 102 },
    ABSTRACT = { Conservation of remaining woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou) populations requires land management strategies that not only maintain caribou habitat, but also favour habitat connectivity. This study presents and field tests graph theory-based measures of landscape connectivity, and demonstrate an association between the distribution of woodland caribou and well-connected winter habitat. Cost values for the intervening land cover types were determined based on the probability of selection relative to high-quality winter habitat. Habitat connectivity was then represented by linking high-quality habitat patches along least-cost paths through this parameterized cost surface. A randomization procedure was used to assess the animal's association with habitat connected at increasing distance thresholds to identify appropriate scales of response. A strong relationship was obtained between large clusters of high-quality winter habitat patches and winter GPS telemetry location points (November 1-March 15) from two woodland caribou herds in Manitoba, Canada. This relationship was stronger when only late winter location points (January 1-March 15) were used. Our results highlight the importance of accounting for the spatial configuration of habitat on the landscape and the intervening land cover types when assessing range quality for woodland caribou. They also provide support for the use of graph theory to assist in identifying core activity areas for woodland caribou and key linkages between these areas and other parts of the landscape. © 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. },
    AFFILIATION = { Parks Canada, 145 McDermot Avenue, Winnipeg, Man. R3B 0R9, Canada; School of Resource and Environmental Management, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada; Gowlland Technologies Ltd., 220 Old Mossy Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2A3, Canada; Department of Zoology, University of Toronto, 25 Harbord Street, Toronto, Ont. M5S 3G5, Canada; Cortex Consultants Inc., 1218 Langley Street, Victoria, BC V8W 1W2, Canada },
    AUTHOR_KEYWORDS = { Functional connectivity; Graph theory; Land management; Landscape configuration; Matrix; Resource conservation },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Article },
    DOI = { 10.1016/j.biocon.2005.12.014 },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-33645031093&doi=10.1016%2fj.biocon.2005.12.014&partnerID=40&md5=43f6ea3b5a11705ada75830e7d37a636 },
}

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