Melles2009519

Référence

Melles, S.J., Badzinski, D., Fortin, M.-J., Csillag, F. and Lindsay, K. (2009) Disentangling habitat and social drivers of nesting patterns in songbirds. Landscape Ecology, 24(4):519-531. (Scopus )

Résumé

Nest locations of breeding birds are often spatially clustered. This tendency to nest together has generally been related to a patchy distribution of nesting habitat in landscape studies, but behavioral studies of species with clustered breeding patterns draw attention to the importance of social and biotic factors. Indeed, it is becoming increasingly apparent that the breeding system of many territorial, migrant birds may be semi-colonial. The reasons for, and extent of, spatial clustering in their breeding systems are not well understood. Our goal was to tease apart the influence of habitat availability and social drivers of clustered breeding in a neotropical migrant species, the hooded warbler (Wilsonia citrina). To test alternative hypotheses related to clustered habitat or conspecific attraction, we combined a habitat classification based on remote sensing with point pattern analysis of nesting sites. Nest locations (n = 150, 1999-2004), collected in a 1213 ha forested area of Southern Ontario (Canada), were analyzed at multiple spatial scales. Ripley's K and pair-correlation functions g (uni- and bivariate) were used to test whether nests were clustered merely because potential nesting habitat was also clustered, or whether nests were additionally clustered with respect to conspecifics. Nest locations tended to be significantly clustered at intermediate distances (particularly between 240 and 420 m). Nests were randomly distributed within available habitat at larger distance scales, up to 1500 m. A reasonable hypothesis to explain the detected additional clustering, and one that is consistent with the results of several behavioral studies, is that females pack their nests more tightly than the available habitat requires to be situated closer to their neighbors' mates. Linking spatially explicit, point pattern analysis with strong inference based on Monte Carlo tests may bring us closer to understanding the generality and reasons behind conspecific attraction at different spatial scales. © 2009 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

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@ARTICLE { Melles2009519,
    AUTHOR = { Melles, S.J. and Badzinski, D. and Fortin, M.-J. and Csillag, F. and Lindsay, K. },
    TITLE = { Disentangling habitat and social drivers of nesting patterns in songbirds },
    JOURNAL = { Landscape Ecology },
    YEAR = { 2009 },
    VOLUME = { 24 },
    NUMBER = { 4 },
    PAGES = { 519-531 },
    NOTE = { cited By 21 },
    ABSTRACT = { Nest locations of breeding birds are often spatially clustered. This tendency to nest together has generally been related to a patchy distribution of nesting habitat in landscape studies, but behavioral studies of species with clustered breeding patterns draw attention to the importance of social and biotic factors. Indeed, it is becoming increasingly apparent that the breeding system of many territorial, migrant birds may be semi-colonial. The reasons for, and extent of, spatial clustering in their breeding systems are not well understood. Our goal was to tease apart the influence of habitat availability and social drivers of clustered breeding in a neotropical migrant species, the hooded warbler (Wilsonia citrina). To test alternative hypotheses related to clustered habitat or conspecific attraction, we combined a habitat classification based on remote sensing with point pattern analysis of nesting sites. Nest locations (n = 150, 1999-2004), collected in a 1213 ha forested area of Southern Ontario (Canada), were analyzed at multiple spatial scales. Ripley's K and pair-correlation functions g (uni- and bivariate) were used to test whether nests were clustered merely because potential nesting habitat was also clustered, or whether nests were additionally clustered with respect to conspecifics. Nest locations tended to be significantly clustered at intermediate distances (particularly between 240 and 420 m). Nests were randomly distributed within available habitat at larger distance scales, up to 1500 m. A reasonable hypothesis to explain the detected additional clustering, and one that is consistent with the results of several behavioral studies, is that females pack their nests more tightly than the available habitat requires to be situated closer to their neighbors' mates. Linking spatially explicit, point pattern analysis with strong inference based on Monte Carlo tests may bring us closer to understanding the generality and reasons behind conspecific attraction at different spatial scales. © 2009 Springer Science+Business Media B.V. },
    AFFILIATION = { Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3G5, Canada; Environment Canada, 867 Lakeshore Rd., Burlington, ON L7R 4A6, Canada; Bird Studies Canada, P.O. Box 160, Port Rowan, ON N0E 1M0, Canada; Department of Geography, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3G5, Canada; Environment Canada, 351 St. Joseph Blvd., Gatineau (Hull), QC K1A 0H3, Canada },
    AUTHOR_KEYWORDS = { Conspecific attraction; Pair-correlation function; Point pattern analysis; Spatial aggregation; Wilsonia citrina },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Article },
    DOI = { 10.1007/s10980-009-9329-9 },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-61849083612&doi=10.1007%2fs10980-009-9329-9&partnerID=40&md5=6d27450a291acb0ba94f4d736f6cd2eb },
}

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