Jordan2002361

Référence

Jordan, G.J., Fortin, M.-J. (2002) Scale and topology in the ecological economics sustainability paradigm. Ecological Economics, 41(2):361-366. (Scopus )

Résumé

An ecologically sustainable scale of the economic system requires inclusion of spatial-temporal dimensions and topological relationships. While Herman E. Daly and Marcus Stewen have deliberated some of the issues surrounding economic scale in their papers ("Allocation, distribution and scale: Towards an economics that is efficient, just and sustainable" [Ecol. Econ. 6 (1992) 185], "The interdependence of allocation, distribution, scale and stability - A comment on Herman E. Daly's vision of an economics that is efficient, just and sustainable" [Ecol. Econ. 27 (1998) 119] and letters to the editor [Ecol. Econ. 30 (1999) 1], [Ecol. Econ. 30 (1999) 2], they do not address spatio-temporal constraints on ecological processes. Although Daly frames the scale of the economy based on sustainable throughput of resources relative to the environment, the pragmatic approach to defining this sustainable scale must incorporate other dimensions of scale. While Daly [Ecol. Econ. 6 (1992) 185], [Ecol. Econ. 30 (1999) 1] correctly promotes a logical sequence of policy instruments, scale should indeed elicit dependence from allocation and distribution decisions. Stewen's [Ecol. Econ. 27 (1998) 119], [Ecol. Econ. 30 (1999) 2] arguments included that these instruments have co-evolutionary interdependencies, but such arguments do not guarantee economic nor ecological sustainability. A more useful definition of sustainable economic scale includes spatial and temporal dimensions, scale constraints and topological relationships as they are framed by ecological components and processes. The spatial scale of the global economy is large, but temporally the global economy is diminutive: two characteristics that typically define catastrophic events in ecological parlance. Using a spatio-temporal framework, Daly's boat analogy can be extended to real-world linkages and possible solutions through supplementing the current view of economic scale with spatio-temporal distance and topology. © 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

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@ARTICLE { Jordan2002361,
    AUTHOR = { Jordan, G.J. and Fortin, M.-J. },
    TITLE = { Scale and topology in the ecological economics sustainability paradigm },
    JOURNAL = { Ecological Economics },
    YEAR = { 2002 },
    VOLUME = { 41 },
    NUMBER = { 2 },
    PAGES = { 361-366 },
    NOTE = { cited By 20 },
    ABSTRACT = { An ecologically sustainable scale of the economic system requires inclusion of spatial-temporal dimensions and topological relationships. While Herman E. Daly and Marcus Stewen have deliberated some of the issues surrounding economic scale in their papers ("Allocation, distribution and scale: Towards an economics that is efficient, just and sustainable" [Ecol. Econ. 6 (1992) 185], "The interdependence of allocation, distribution, scale and stability - A comment on Herman E. Daly's vision of an economics that is efficient, just and sustainable" [Ecol. Econ. 27 (1998) 119] and letters to the editor [Ecol. Econ. 30 (1999) 1], [Ecol. Econ. 30 (1999) 2], they do not address spatio-temporal constraints on ecological processes. Although Daly frames the scale of the economy based on sustainable throughput of resources relative to the environment, the pragmatic approach to defining this sustainable scale must incorporate other dimensions of scale. While Daly [Ecol. Econ. 6 (1992) 185], [Ecol. Econ. 30 (1999) 1] correctly promotes a logical sequence of policy instruments, scale should indeed elicit dependence from allocation and distribution decisions. Stewen's [Ecol. Econ. 27 (1998) 119], [Ecol. Econ. 30 (1999) 2] arguments included that these instruments have co-evolutionary interdependencies, but such arguments do not guarantee economic nor ecological sustainability. A more useful definition of sustainable economic scale includes spatial and temporal dimensions, scale constraints and topological relationships as they are framed by ecological components and processes. The spatial scale of the global economy is large, but temporally the global economy is diminutive: two characteristics that typically define catastrophic events in ecological parlance. Using a spatio-temporal framework, Daly's boat analogy can be extended to real-world linkages and possible solutions through supplementing the current view of economic scale with spatio-temporal distance and topology. © 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. },
    AFFILIATION = { School of Resource and Environmental Management, Simon Fraser University, 8888 University Drive, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6, Canada; Department of Zoology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3G5, Canada },
    ART_NUMBER = { 1373 },
    AUTHOR_KEYWORDS = { Scale; Spatio-temporal; Sustainability; Topology },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Article },
    DOI = { 10.1016/S0921-8009(02)00035-6 },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-0036076440&doi=10.1016%2fS0921-8009%2802%2900035-6&partnerID=40&md5=2aea482acca7c77c71bf2c38c6cb17f7 },
}

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