Fall2004310

Référence

Fall, A., Fortin, M.-J., Kneeshaw, D.D., Yamasaki, S.H., Messier, C., Bouthillier, L. and Smyth, C. (2004) Consequences of various landscape-scale ecosystem management strategies and fire cycles on age-class structure and harvest in boreal forests. Canadian Journal of Forest Research, 34(2):310-322. (Scopus )

Résumé

At the landscape scale, one of the key indicators of sustainable forest management is the age-class distribution of stands, since it provides a coarse synopsis of habitat potential, structural complexity, and stand volume, and it is directly modified by timber extraction and wildfire. To explore the consequences of several landscape-scale boreal forest management strategies on age-class structure in the Mauricie region of Quebec, we used spatially explicit simulation modelling. Our study investigated three different harvesting strategies (the one currently practiced and two different strategies to maintain late seral stands) and interactions between fire and harvesting on stand age-class distribution. We found that the legacy of initial forested age structure and its spatial configuration can pose short- (<50 years) to medium-term (150-300 years) challenges to balancing wood supply and ecological objectives. Also, ongoing disturbance by fire, even at relatively long cycles in relation to historic levels, can further constrain the achievement of both timber and biodiversity goals. For example, when fire was combined with management, harvest shortfalls occurred in all scenarios with a fire cycle of 100 years and most scenarios with a fire cycle of 150 years. Even a fire cycle of 500 years led to a reduction in older forest when its maintenance was not a primary constraint. Our results highlight the need to consider the broad-scale effects of natural disturbance when developing ecosystem management policies and the importance of prioritizing objectives when planning for multiple resource use.

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@ARTICLE { Fall2004310,
    AUTHOR = { Fall, A. and Fortin, M.-J. and Kneeshaw, D.D. and Yamasaki, S.H. and Messier, C. and Bouthillier, L. and Smyth, C. },
    TITLE = { Consequences of various landscape-scale ecosystem management strategies and fire cycles on age-class structure and harvest in boreal forests },
    JOURNAL = { Canadian Journal of Forest Research },
    YEAR = { 2004 },
    VOLUME = { 34 },
    NUMBER = { 2 },
    PAGES = { 310-322 },
    NOTE = { cited By 47 },
    ABSTRACT = { At the landscape scale, one of the key indicators of sustainable forest management is the age-class distribution of stands, since it provides a coarse synopsis of habitat potential, structural complexity, and stand volume, and it is directly modified by timber extraction and wildfire. To explore the consequences of several landscape-scale boreal forest management strategies on age-class structure in the Mauricie region of Quebec, we used spatially explicit simulation modelling. Our study investigated three different harvesting strategies (the one currently practiced and two different strategies to maintain late seral stands) and interactions between fire and harvesting on stand age-class distribution. We found that the legacy of initial forested age structure and its spatial configuration can pose short- (<50 years) to medium-term (150-300 years) challenges to balancing wood supply and ecological objectives. Also, ongoing disturbance by fire, even at relatively long cycles in relation to historic levels, can further constrain the achievement of both timber and biodiversity goals. For example, when fire was combined with management, harvest shortfalls occurred in all scenarios with a fire cycle of 100 years and most scenarios with a fire cycle of 150 years. Even a fire cycle of 500 years led to a reduction in older forest when its maintenance was not a primary constraint. Our results highlight the need to consider the broad-scale effects of natural disturbance when developing ecosystem management policies and the importance of prioritizing objectives when planning for multiple resource use. },
    AFFILIATION = { Sch. of Rsrc. and Environ. Mgmt., Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6, Canada; Grp. Rech. Ecologie Forestiere I., Univ. de Quebec a Montreal, Montréal, Que. H3B 3H5, Canada; Dept. Sci. du Bois et de la Foret, Université Laval, Québec, Que. G1K 7P4, Canada; 220 Old Mossy Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2A3, Canada; Department of Zoology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont. M5S 3G5, Canada },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Conference Paper },
    DOI = { 10.1139/x03-143 },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-2342535115&doi=10.1139%2fx03-143&partnerID=40&md5=e3499e233dc1bd29ef99ce76c8ce4d20 },
}

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