GervaisFournierBelisle2020

Référence

Gervais, A., Fournier, V., Belisle, M. (2020) Agricultural landscape composition affects the development and life expectancy of colonies of Bombus impatiens. Ecosphere, 11(7). (Scopus )

Résumé

Bumble bees are essential, efficient pollinators of numerous crops, and scientists are increasingly concerned about their global decline. Although several potential causes have been put forward, the concurrent modification of landscape structure and pesticide use by agriculture are often pointed out as the main drivers of the decline. Yet, the mechanisms through which these factors cause species to decline remain elusive. Most field studies have been conducted at the individual level, and the few studies that addressed higher levels of organization only covered narrow ecological conditions. We undertook a field experiment in spring 2016 to overcome these limitations by placing four commercial Bombus impatiens colonies in each of 20 sites located along a gradient of agricultural intensity in southern Québec, Canada. We hypothesized that landscape habitat composition and configuration, as well as local floral resources, would affect colony development. We expected colonies surrounded by low-intensity and/or flowering crops in heterogeneous landscapes to develop better and live longer, partly linked to more abundant and diversified food resources, than colonies embedded in landscapes dominated by high-intensity crops. Colonies were weighed once a week, and workers were captured to assess pollen load diversity. Final colony weight, queen production, and presence of depredators (Aphomia sociella, Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) were also recorded. Landscape habitat composition and configuration were characterized within 1 km of colonies. Local availability of floral resources was assessed within 100 m of colonies every two weeks. As predicted, colony weight and longevity decreased with the proportion of intensive crops and increased with the amount of flowering crops, but queen production and the occurrence of A. sociella were not affected by landscape composition. Contrary to our prediction, local availability of floral resources also did not affect colonies. The pollen richness brought back to colonies decreased with the proportion of flowering crops and varied according to the proportion of intensive crops interacting with local floral resources. Our work contributes to generalize the more restrictive conclusion of local-scale, crop-specific studies that intensive crop farming undermines bumble bee colony development and that it may thus play a role in the large-scale population decline of these insects. © 2020 The Authors.

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@ARTICLE { GervaisFournierBelisle2020,
    AUTHOR = { Gervais, A. and Fournier, V. and Belisle, M. },
    JOURNAL = { Ecosphere },
    TITLE = { Agricultural landscape composition affects the development and life expectancy of colonies of Bombus impatiens },
    YEAR = { 2020 },
    NOTE = { cited By 0 },
    NUMBER = { 7 },
    VOLUME = { 11 },
    ABSTRACT = { Bumble bees are essential, efficient pollinators of numerous crops, and scientists are increasingly concerned about their global decline. Although several potential causes have been put forward, the concurrent modification of landscape structure and pesticide use by agriculture are often pointed out as the main drivers of the decline. Yet, the mechanisms through which these factors cause species to decline remain elusive. Most field studies have been conducted at the individual level, and the few studies that addressed higher levels of organization only covered narrow ecological conditions. We undertook a field experiment in spring 2016 to overcome these limitations by placing four commercial Bombus impatiens colonies in each of 20 sites located along a gradient of agricultural intensity in southern Québec, Canada. We hypothesized that landscape habitat composition and configuration, as well as local floral resources, would affect colony development. We expected colonies surrounded by low-intensity and/or flowering crops in heterogeneous landscapes to develop better and live longer, partly linked to more abundant and diversified food resources, than colonies embedded in landscapes dominated by high-intensity crops. Colonies were weighed once a week, and workers were captured to assess pollen load diversity. Final colony weight, queen production, and presence of depredators (Aphomia sociella, Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) were also recorded. Landscape habitat composition and configuration were characterized within 1 km of colonies. Local availability of floral resources was assessed within 100 m of colonies every two weeks. As predicted, colony weight and longevity decreased with the proportion of intensive crops and increased with the amount of flowering crops, but queen production and the occurrence of A. sociella were not affected by landscape composition. Contrary to our prediction, local availability of floral resources also did not affect colonies. The pollen richness brought back to colonies decreased with the proportion of flowering crops and varied according to the proportion of intensive crops interacting with local floral resources. Our work contributes to generalize the more restrictive conclusion of local-scale, crop-specific studies that intensive crop farming undermines bumble bee colony development and that it may thus play a role in the large-scale population decline of these insects. © 2020 The Authors. },
    AFFILIATION = { Centre de recherche et d’innovation sur les végétaux (CRIV) et Département de phytologie, Université Laval, 2480 Boulevard Hochelaga, Quebec City, QC G1V 0A6, Canada; Centre d’étude de la forêt (CEF) et Département de biologie, Université de Sherbrooke, 2500 Boulevard de l'Université, Sherbrooke, QC J1K 2R1, Canada },
    ART_NUMBER = { e03142 },
    AUTHOR_KEYWORDS = { Aphomia sociella; Bumble bees; colonies; corn crops; land cover; landscape; margins; neonicotinoids; pollen load; queen },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Article },
    DOI = { 10.1002/ecs2.3142 },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85088809282&doi=10.1002%2fecs2.3142&partnerID=40&md5=3958a6f914ff7b20edcdf9cf763cd177 },
}

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