Haché20176078

Référence

Hache, S., Bayne, E.M., Villard, M.-A., Proctor, H., Davis, C.S., Stralberg, D., Janes, J.K., Hallworth, M.T., Foster, K.R., Chidambara-vasi, E., Grossi, A.A., Gorrell, J.C., Krikun, R. (2017) Phylogeography of a migratory songbird across its Canadian breeding range: Implications for conservation units. Ecology and Evolution, 7(16):6078-6088. (Scopus )

Résumé

The objectives of this study were to describe and evaluate potential drivers of genetic structure in Canadian breeding populations of the Ovenbird, Seiurus aurocapilla. We performed genetic analyses on feather samples of individuals from six study sites using nuclear microsatellites. We also assessed species identity and population genetic structure of quill mites (Acariformes, Syringophilidae). For male Ovenbirds breeding in three study sites, we collected light-level geolocator data to document migratory paths and identify the wintering grounds. We also generated paleohindcast projections from bioclimatic models of Ovenbird distribution to identify potential refugia during the last glacial maximum (LGM, 21,000 years before present) as a factor explaining population genetic structure. Birds breeding in the Cypress Hills (Alberta/Saskatchewan) may be considered a distinct genetic unit, but there was no evidence for genetic differentiation among any other populations. We found relatively strong migratory connectivity in both western and eastern populations, but some evidence of mixing among populations on the wintering grounds. There was also little genetic variation among syringophilid mites from the different Ovenbird populations. These results are consistent with paleohindcast distribution predictions derived from two different global climate models indicating a continuous single LGM refugium, with the possibility of two refugia. Our results suggest that Ovenbird populations breeding in boreal and hemiboreal regions are panmictic, whereas the population breeding in Cypress Hills should be considered a distinct management unit. © 2017 The Authors. Ecology and Evolution published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

Format EndNote

Vous pouvez importer cette référence dans EndNote.

Format BibTeX-CSV

Vous pouvez importer cette référence en format BibTeX-CSV.

Format BibTeX

Vous pouvez copier l'entrée BibTeX de cette référence ci-bas, ou l'importer directement dans un logiciel tel que JabRef .

@ARTICLE { Haché20176078,
    AUTHOR = { Hache, S. and Bayne, E.M. and Villard, M.-A. and Proctor, H. and Davis, C.S. and Stralberg, D. and Janes, J.K. and Hallworth, M.T. and Foster, K.R. and Chidambara-vasi, E. and Grossi, A.A. and Gorrell, J.C. and Krikun, R. },
    TITLE = { Phylogeography of a migratory songbird across its Canadian breeding range: Implications for conservation units },
    JOURNAL = { Ecology and Evolution },
    YEAR = { 2017 },
    VOLUME = { 7 },
    NUMBER = { 16 },
    PAGES = { 6078-6088 },
    NOTE = { cited By 0 },
    ABSTRACT = { The objectives of this study were to describe and evaluate potential drivers of genetic structure in Canadian breeding populations of the Ovenbird, Seiurus aurocapilla. We performed genetic analyses on feather samples of individuals from six study sites using nuclear microsatellites. We also assessed species identity and population genetic structure of quill mites (Acariformes, Syringophilidae). For male Ovenbirds breeding in three study sites, we collected light-level geolocator data to document migratory paths and identify the wintering grounds. We also generated paleohindcast projections from bioclimatic models of Ovenbird distribution to identify potential refugia during the last glacial maximum (LGM, 21,000 years before present) as a factor explaining population genetic structure. Birds breeding in the Cypress Hills (Alberta/Saskatchewan) may be considered a distinct genetic unit, but there was no evidence for genetic differentiation among any other populations. We found relatively strong migratory connectivity in both western and eastern populations, but some evidence of mixing among populations on the wintering grounds. There was also little genetic variation among syringophilid mites from the different Ovenbird populations. These results are consistent with paleohindcast distribution predictions derived from two different global climate models indicating a continuous single LGM refugium, with the possibility of two refugia. Our results suggest that Ovenbird populations breeding in boreal and hemiboreal regions are panmictic, whereas the population breeding in Cypress Hills should be considered a distinct management unit. © 2017 The Authors. Ecology and Evolution published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. },
    AFFILIATION = { Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada; Environment and Climate Change Canada, Yellowknife, NT, Canada; Département de biologie, chimie et géographie, Université du Québec à Rimouski, Rimouski, QC, Canada; Department of Renewable Resources, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada; Migratory Bird Center, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, National Zoological Park, Washington, DC, United States; Owl Moon Environmental Inc., Fort McMurray, AB, Canada; Biology Department, Vancouver Island University, Nanaimo, BC, Canada; Lesser Slave Lake Bird Observatory, Slave Lake, AB, Canada },
    AUTHOR_KEYWORDS = { genetics; light-level geolocator; microsatellites; migration; Ovenbird; paleohindcast models; population structure; Seiurus aurocapilla; syringophilid quill mites },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Article },
    DOI = { 10.1002/ece3.3170 },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85021404771&doi=10.1002%2fece3.3170&partnerID=40&md5=b33d227dddd6f11cb9a07e102abf867f },
}

********************************************************** *************************** FRQNT ************************ **********************************************************

Un regroupement stratégique du

********************************************************** *********************** Infolettre *********************** **********************************************************

Abonnez-vous à
l'Infolettre du CEF!

********************************************************** *********************** Colloque CEF *********************** **********************************************************

Participez au
14e Colloque du CEF!

28-30 avril 2020
Orford - Sherbrooke

********************************************************** ************* Écoles d'été et formation **************************** **********************************************************

Écoles d'été et formations

********************************************************** ***************** Pub - ABC CBA 2020 ****************** **********************************************************

31 mai au 4 juin 2020

********************************************************** ***************** Pub - Congrès Mycelium ****************** **********************************************************

26 au 28 août 2020

********************************************************** ***************** Pub - Symphonies_Boreales ****************** **********************************************************

********************************************************** ***************** Boîte à trucs *************** **********************************************************

CEF-Référence
La référence vedette !

Jérémie Alluard (2016) Les statistiques au moments de la rédaction 

  • Ce document a pour but de guider les étudiants à intégrer de manière appropriée une analyse statistique dans leur rapport de recherche.

Voir les autres...