Haché2010897

Référence

Hache, S., Villard, M.-A. (2010) Age-specific response of a migratory bird to an experimental alteration of its habitat. Journal of Animal Ecology, 79(4):897-905. (Scopus )

Résumé

1. Recruitment, i.e. the influx of new breeding individuals into a population, is an important demographic parameter, especially in species with a short life span. Few studies have measured this parameter in solitary-breeding animal populations even though it may yield critical information on habitat suitability and functional connectivity. 2. Using a before-after, control-impact pairs (BACIP) experimental design, we measured: (i) the return rate and apparent survival rate of individually marked territorial males of a neotropical migrant bird species, the Ovenbird Seiurus aurocapilla Linnaeus and (ii) the age-specific recruitment rate. Study plots (n = 10) were paired: one was treated through single-tree selection harvesting (30-40% basal area removal) and the other acted as a control. We hypothesized that experienced males would out-compete inexperienced ones and tend to avoid settling in lowerquality, treated stands. 3. In the first year post-harvest, the mean density of territorial males was significantly lower in treated plots ()41%) than in controls and the difference remained relatively stable thereafter. This lower density mainly reflected a lower recruitment rate compared to controls (17 9 vs. 49 0% of males present), itself driven by a lower recruitment rate of experienced males (2 8 vs. 22 8%). Return rate was similar between controls and treated plots in the first year post-harvest (59 vs. 55%, respectively) but it decreased in treated plots during the second ()15 8% relative to controls) and third ()12 7%) year post-harvest. The trend was even stronger when considering only experienced males. The treatment was followed by a major expansion in mean territory size in treated plots (+49% relative to controls, 3rd year post-treatment). 4. Neither apparent survival rate nor recruitment rate varied as predicted. There was a strong year effect but no treatment effect on apparent survival rate, whereas male recruitment patterns were both year- and age-specific. Three years post-harvest, recruitment rate was sufficient to fill most territory vacancies in treated plots, due mainly to first-time breeders. 5. To our knowledge, this is the first study documenting the effects of experimental habitat alteration on recruitment rate in a songbird species using a BACI design. The response of this male subpopulation highlights the influence of recruitment on the density of open populations of solitary-nesting birds and age-specific patterns in the response of individuals to habitat alterations. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 British Ecological Society.

Format EndNote

Vous pouvez importer cette référence dans EndNote.

Format BibTeX-CSV

Vous pouvez importer cette référence en format BibTeX-CSV.

Format BibTeX

Vous pouvez copier l'entrée BibTeX de cette référence ci-bas, ou l'importer directement dans un logiciel tel que JabRef .

@ARTICLE { Haché2010897,
    AUTHOR = { Hache, S. and Villard, M.-A. },
    TITLE = { Age-specific response of a migratory bird to an experimental alteration of its habitat },
    JOURNAL = { Journal of Animal Ecology },
    YEAR = { 2010 },
    VOLUME = { 79 },
    NUMBER = { 4 },
    PAGES = { 897-905 },
    NOTE = { cited By 19 },
    ABSTRACT = { 1. Recruitment, i.e. the influx of new breeding individuals into a population, is an important demographic parameter, especially in species with a short life span. Few studies have measured this parameter in solitary-breeding animal populations even though it may yield critical information on habitat suitability and functional connectivity. 2. Using a before-after, control-impact pairs (BACIP) experimental design, we measured: (i) the return rate and apparent survival rate of individually marked territorial males of a neotropical migrant bird species, the Ovenbird Seiurus aurocapilla Linnaeus and (ii) the age-specific recruitment rate. Study plots (n = 10) were paired: one was treated through single-tree selection harvesting (30-40% basal area removal) and the other acted as a control. We hypothesized that experienced males would out-compete inexperienced ones and tend to avoid settling in lowerquality, treated stands. 3. In the first year post-harvest, the mean density of territorial males was significantly lower in treated plots ()41%) than in controls and the difference remained relatively stable thereafter. This lower density mainly reflected a lower recruitment rate compared to controls (17 9 vs. 49 0% of males present), itself driven by a lower recruitment rate of experienced males (2 8 vs. 22 8%). Return rate was similar between controls and treated plots in the first year post-harvest (59 vs. 55%, respectively) but it decreased in treated plots during the second ()15 8% relative to controls) and third ()12 7%) year post-harvest. The trend was even stronger when considering only experienced males. The treatment was followed by a major expansion in mean territory size in treated plots (+49% relative to controls, 3rd year post-treatment). 4. Neither apparent survival rate nor recruitment rate varied as predicted. There was a strong year effect but no treatment effect on apparent survival rate, whereas male recruitment patterns were both year- and age-specific. Three years post-harvest, recruitment rate was sufficient to fill most territory vacancies in treated plots, due mainly to first-time breeders. 5. To our knowledge, this is the first study documenting the effects of experimental habitat alteration on recruitment rate in a songbird species using a BACI design. The response of this male subpopulation highlights the influence of recruitment on the density of open populations of solitary-nesting birds and age-specific patterns in the response of individuals to habitat alterations. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 British Ecological Society. },
    AFFILIATION = { Chaire de recherche du Canada en conservation des paysages, Département de biologie, Université de Moncton, Moncton, NB E1A 3E9, Canada },
    AUTHOR_KEYWORDS = { Habitat selection; Ideal despotic distribution; Managed forest landscapes; Recruitment; Time-lagged response },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Article },
    DOI = { 10.1111/j.1365-2656.2010.01694.x },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-77957686763&doi=10.1111%2fj.1365-2656.2010.01694.x&partnerID=40&md5=e63b0d477031a44f322bdb1631abf42c },
}

********************************************************** *************************** FRQNT ************************ **********************************************************

Un regroupement stratégique du

********************************************************** *********************** Infolettre *********************** **********************************************************

Abonnez-vous à
l'Infolettre du CEF!

********************************************************** ***************** Pub - Congrès Mycelium ****************** **********************************************************

Reporté en 2021

********************************************************** ***************** Pub - IWTT ****************** **********************************************************

Reporté en 2021

**********************************************************

***************** Pub - Symphonies_Boreales ****************** **********************************************************

********************************************************** ***************** Boîte à trucs *************** **********************************************************

CEF-Référence
La référence vedette !

Jérémie Alluard (2016) Les statistiques au moments de la rédaction 

  • Ce document a pour but de guider les étudiants à intégrer de manière appropriée une analyse statistique dans leur rapport de recherche.

Voir les autres...