PerrierKneeshawStLaurentEtAl2021

Référence

Perrier, J.M., Kneeshaw, D.D., St-Laurent, M.-H., Villard, M.-A. (2021) Site-infidelity by budworm-linked warblers at the edge of an area defoliated by spruce budworm [Infidélité au site chez les parulines de tordeuse en bordure d'une zone défoliée par la tordeuse des bourgeons de l'épinette]. Avian Conservation and Ecology, 16(1). (Scopus )

Résumé

Most songbird species show some degree of fidelity to their previous breeding location, especially after successful reproduction. However, species associated with highly dynamic food sources (e.g., outbreaking insects) may have to adopt more flexible strategies. Three species (Tennessee Warbler, Leiothlypis peregrina; Cape May Warbler, Setophaga tigrina; and Bay-breasted Warbler, S. castanea ) show strong numerical responses to spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana-SBW) outbreaks. These species, referred to as "budworm-linked warblers", might track SBW larvae through extensive natal dispersal. Then, the superabundance of food during outbreaks would be expected to lead to high breeding productivity which, in turn, should promote breeding site fidelity. Here, we aimed to determine whether budworm-linked warblers were faithful to their previous year's breeding season location and, if so, whether their probability of return was influenced by habitat characteristics such as the density of SBW larvae, stand structure, or landscape structure. We hypothesized that return rate of budworm-linked warblers will be high, as reported in other species of New World warblers, and we predicted that among habitat characteristics, return rate will increase with the density of SBW larvae. We banded 117 budworm-linked warblers (94 % being males) in 75 study plots distributed along a gradient of SBW density and searched for returning individuals within 50 m of their capture sites using song playbacks. Contrary to our hypothesis, resighting rate was very low (0-10.5%). This relative "infidelity" suggests that breeding dispersal of budworm-linked warblers was relatively extensive. Only habitat proportion within an 8-km radius had an important (negative) effect on the probability of resighting Bay-breasted Warbler. Budworm-linked warblers did not exhibit strong site fidelity as adults, but instead performed breeding dispersal movements, presumably to track SBW outbreaks. This strategy may reflect strong spatiotemporal variations in the density SBW larvae. © 2021 by the author(s). Published here under license by the Resilience Alliance.

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@ARTICLE { PerrierKneeshawStLaurentEtAl2021,
    AUTHOR = { Perrier, J.M. and Kneeshaw, D.D. and St-Laurent, M.-H. and Villard, M.-A. },
    JOURNAL = { Avian Conservation and Ecology },
    TITLE = { Site-infidelity by budworm-linked warblers at the edge of an area defoliated by spruce budworm [Infidélité au site chez les parulines de tordeuse en bordure d'une zone défoliée par la tordeuse des bourgeons de l'épinette] },
    YEAR = { 2021 },
    NOTE = { cited By 1 },
    NUMBER = { 1 },
    VOLUME = { 16 },
    ABSTRACT = { Most songbird species show some degree of fidelity to their previous breeding location, especially after successful reproduction. However, species associated with highly dynamic food sources (e.g., outbreaking insects) may have to adopt more flexible strategies. Three species (Tennessee Warbler, Leiothlypis peregrina; Cape May Warbler, Setophaga tigrina; and Bay-breasted Warbler, S. castanea ) show strong numerical responses to spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana-SBW) outbreaks. These species, referred to as "budworm-linked warblers", might track SBW larvae through extensive natal dispersal. Then, the superabundance of food during outbreaks would be expected to lead to high breeding productivity which, in turn, should promote breeding site fidelity. Here, we aimed to determine whether budworm-linked warblers were faithful to their previous year's breeding season location and, if so, whether their probability of return was influenced by habitat characteristics such as the density of SBW larvae, stand structure, or landscape structure. We hypothesized that return rate of budworm-linked warblers will be high, as reported in other species of New World warblers, and we predicted that among habitat characteristics, return rate will increase with the density of SBW larvae. We banded 117 budworm-linked warblers (94 % being males) in 75 study plots distributed along a gradient of SBW density and searched for returning individuals within 50 m of their capture sites using song playbacks. Contrary to our hypothesis, resighting rate was very low (0-10.5%). This relative "infidelity" suggests that breeding dispersal of budworm-linked warblers was relatively extensive. Only habitat proportion within an 8-km radius had an important (negative) effect on the probability of resighting Bay-breasted Warbler. Budworm-linked warblers did not exhibit strong site fidelity as adults, but instead performed breeding dispersal movements, presumably to track SBW outbreaks. This strategy may reflect strong spatiotemporal variations in the density SBW larvae. © 2021 by the author(s). Published here under license by the Resilience Alliance. },
    AFFILIATION = { Département de biologie, chimie et géographie, Centre d'étude de la forêt, Université du Québec à RimouskiQuébec, Canada; Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada },
    ART_NUMBER = { 17 },
    AUTHOR_KEYWORDS = { Defoliating insects; Dispersal; Movements; Resource tracking; Site fidelity },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Article },
    DOI = { 10.5751/ACE-01847-160117 },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85107745301&doi=10.5751%2fACE-01847-160117&partnerID=40&md5=c18f06d6558b93aeab6c11b9c0a6ad75 },
}

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