BoulangerSirois2007

Référence

Boulanger, Y. and Sirois, L. (2007) Postfire succession of saproxylic arthropods, with emphasis on coleoptera, in the North Boreal forest of Quebec. Environmental Entomology, 36(1):128-141. (Scopus )

Résumé

Saproxylic succession in fire-killed black spruce [Picea mariana (Mill.) B.S.P.] coarse woody debris (CWD) in northern Quebec is estimated in this study using a 29-yr postfire chronosequence. Sampling was performed using both trunk-window traps and rearing from snag and log sections. A total of 37,312 arthropods (>220 taxa) were collected from both sampling methods. Two distinct colonization waves were identified. The onset of initial colonization occurs the year of the fire, whereas the second colonization phase begins only once debris falls to the ground. The initial colonization step is influenced by fire-associated species including subcortical predators, xylophages, and ascomycetes feeders. Abundance of most early colonizer species decline with time since fire with the disappearance of subcortical habitat. No noticeable species turnover occurred in snags thereafter. Lack of succession in snags is related to very low decomposition rates for postfire CWD because this substrate is unsuitable for species associated with highly decayed wood. Snag falling triggers fungal growth and concomitant saproxylic succession toward micro- and saprophagous species and increases accessibiltity for soil-dwelling organisms. Because the position of woody debris greatly influences overall physical properties of dead wood, the fall of burned CWD plays a major role in saproxylic community shift after fire. © 2007 Entomological Society of America.

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@ARTICLE { BoulangerSirois2007,
    AUTHOR = { Boulanger, Y. and Sirois, L. },
    TITLE = { Postfire succession of saproxylic arthropods, with emphasis on coleoptera, in the North Boreal forest of Quebec },
    JOURNAL = { Environmental Entomology },
    YEAR = { 2007 },
    VOLUME = { 36 },
    PAGES = { 128-141 },
    NUMBER = { 1 },
    ABSTRACT = { Saproxylic succession in fire-killed black spruce [Picea mariana (Mill.) B.S.P.] coarse woody debris (CWD) in northern Quebec is estimated in this study using a 29-yr postfire chronosequence. Sampling was performed using both trunk-window traps and rearing from snag and log sections. A total of 37,312 arthropods (>220 taxa) were collected from both sampling methods. Two distinct colonization waves were identified. The onset of initial colonization occurs the year of the fire, whereas the second colonization phase begins only once debris falls to the ground. The initial colonization step is influenced by fire-associated species including subcortical predators, xylophages, and ascomycetes feeders. Abundance of most early colonizer species decline with time since fire with the disappearance of subcortical habitat. No noticeable species turnover occurred in snags thereafter. Lack of succession in snags is related to very low decomposition rates for postfire CWD because this substrate is unsuitable for species associated with highly decayed wood. Snag falling triggers fungal growth and concomitant saproxylic succession toward micro- and saprophagous species and increases accessibiltity for soil-dwelling organisms. Because the position of woody debris greatly influences overall physical properties of dead wood, the fall of burned CWD plays a major role in saproxylic community shift after fire. © 2007 Entomological Society of America. },
    COMMENT = { Cited By (since 1996): 8 Export Date: 10 February 2010 Source: Scopus CODEN: EVETB },
    ISSN = { 0046225X (ISSN) },
    KEYWORDS = { Black spruce, Boreal forest, Coarse woody debris, Fire, Saproxylic insects, arthropod, boreal forest, chronosequence, coarse woody debris, colonization, coniferous forest, forest fire, fungus, pioneer species, saproxylic organism, secondary succession, snag, animal, arthropod, article, beetle, biodiversity, Canada, classification, fire, physiology, population dynamics, spruce, tree, wood, Animals, Arthropods, Beetles, Biodiversity, Fires, Picea, Population Dynamics, Quebec, Trees, Wood, Canada, North America, Quebec [Canada], Arthropoda, Ascomycota, Coleoptera, Fungi, Hexapoda, Picea mariana },
    OWNER = { Luc },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2010.02.10 },
    URL = { http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-34047183605&partnerID=40&md5=f20c363ed34500cc9b544b34e0e79454 },
}

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