PotvinBelangerLowell2000

Référence

Potvin, F., Belanger, L. and Lowell, K. (2000) Marten habitat selection in a clearcut boreal landscape. Conservation Biology, 14(3):844-857.

Résumé

To describe the forest mosaic suitable for marten (Martes americana) in a clearcut boreal landscape, we studied habitat selection in an area (123 km(2)) located in western Quebec, in which black spruce (Picea mariana) was the predominant forest type. This block had been recently clearcut with the protection of regeneration cutting technique, a logging method that employs equally spaced harvesting trails. The resulting landscape had a center dominated by a cutover matrix (60% of the block) and surrounded by contiguous uncut forest. Over 2 years, 20 marten equipped with radio collars provided enough locations to delineate their winter home range. Habitat composition and spatial configuration were measured at both stand and landscape scales by means of a geographic information system database that included telemetry locations and home ranges, forest maps, and limits of clearcut areas. Inside their winter home ranges, animals avoided open regenerating stands composed mostly of recent clearcuts with sparse regeneration. They did not select coniferous stands, even those that were mature or overmature, but preferred deciduous and mixed stands, a large proportion of which had a dense coniferous shrub layer as a result of a spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) epidemic 15-20 years ago. At the landscape scale, winter home ranges differed from random mosaics because they had a larger proportion of uncut forest (>30 years), a smaller proportion of open regenerating stands, larger core area in forest habitat, and less edge between open regenerating stands and forest. Winter home ranges usually contained <30-35% open or closed regenerating stands and >40-50% uncut forest. We conclude that marten and clearcutting may be compatible, provided that forest logging is adapted to that species at the landscape level. Where the objective is to maintain marten at a local scale in black spruce forest, we suggest that greater than or equal to 50% uncut forest be preserved inside 10-km(2) units and that <30% of the area be clearcut over a 30-year period.

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@ARTICLE { PotvinBelangerLowell2000,
    AUTHOR = { Potvin, F. and Belanger, L. and Lowell, K. },
    TITLE = { Marten habitat selection in a clearcut boreal landscape },
    JOURNAL = { Conservation Biology },
    YEAR = { 2000 },
    VOLUME = { 14 },
    PAGES = { 844-857 },
    NUMBER = { 3 },
    ABSTRACT = { To describe the forest mosaic suitable for marten (Martes americana) in a clearcut boreal landscape, we studied habitat selection in an area (123 km(2)) located in western Quebec, in which black spruce (Picea mariana) was the predominant forest type. This block had been recently clearcut with the protection of regeneration cutting technique, a logging method that employs equally spaced harvesting trails. The resulting landscape had a center dominated by a cutover matrix (60% of the block) and surrounded by contiguous uncut forest. Over 2 years, 20 marten equipped with radio collars provided enough locations to delineate their winter home range. Habitat composition and spatial configuration were measured at both stand and landscape scales by means of a geographic information system database that included telemetry locations and home ranges, forest maps, and limits of clearcut areas. Inside their winter home ranges, animals avoided open regenerating stands composed mostly of recent clearcuts with sparse regeneration. They did not select coniferous stands, even those that were mature or overmature, but preferred deciduous and mixed stands, a large proportion of which had a dense coniferous shrub layer as a result of a spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) epidemic 15-20 years ago. At the landscape scale, winter home ranges differed from random mosaics because they had a larger proportion of uncut forest (>30 years), a smaller proportion of open regenerating stands, larger core area in forest habitat, and less edge between open regenerating stands and forest. Winter home ranges usually contained <30-35% open or closed regenerating stands and >40-50% uncut forest. We conclude that marten and clearcutting may be compatible, provided that forest logging is adapted to that species at the landscape level. Where the objective is to maintain marten at a local scale in black spruce forest, we suggest that greater than or equal to 50% uncut forest be preserved inside 10-km(2) units and that <30% of the area be clearcut over a 30-year period. },
    KEYWORDS = { AMERICAN MARTEN; STATISTICAL TECHNIQUES; ECOSYSTEM MANAGEMENT; RESOURCE SELECTION; HOME-RANGE; FOREST; POPULATION; WINTER; BIODIVERSITY; NEWFOUNDLAND },
    OWNER = { brugerolles },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2007.12.05 },
}

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