Miller2014745

Référence

Miller, T.A., Brooks, R.P., Lanzone, M., Brandes, D., Cooper, J., O'Malley, K., Maisonneuve, C., Tremblay, J.A., Duerr, A., Katzner, T. (2014) Assessing risk to birds from industrial wind energy development via paired resource selection models. Conservation Biology, 28(3):745-755. (Scopus )

Résumé

When wildlife habitat overlaps with industrial development animals may be harmed. Because wildlife and people select resources to maximize biological fitness and economic return, respectively, we estimated risk, the probability of eagles encountering and being affected by turbines, by overlaying models of resource selection for each entity. This conceptual framework can be applied across multiple spatial scales to understand and mitigate impacts of industry on wildlife. We estimated risk to Golden Eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) from wind energy development in 3 topographically distinct regions of the central Appalachian Mountains of Pennsylvania (United States) based on models of resource selection of wind facilities (n = 43) and of northbound migrating eagles (n = 30). Risk to eagles from wind energy was greatest in the Ridge and Valley region; all 24 eagles that passed through that region used the highest risk landscapes at least once during low altitude flight. In contrast, only half of the birds that entered the Allegheny Plateau region used highest risk landscapes and none did in the Allegheny Mountains. Likewise, in the Allegheny Mountains, the majority of wind turbines (56%) were situated in poor eagle habitat; thus, risk to eagles is lower there than in the Ridge and Valley, where only 1% of turbines are in poor eagle habitat. Risk within individual facilities was extremely variable; on average, facilities had 11% (SD 23; range = 0-100%) of turbines in highest risk landscapes and 26% (SD 30; range = 0-85%) of turbines in the lowest risk landscapes. Our results provide a mechanism for relocating high-risk turbines, and they show the feasibility of this novel and highly adaptable framework for managing risk of harm to wildlife from industrial development. © 2014 Society for Conservation Biology.

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@ARTICLE { Miller2014745,
    AUTHOR = { Miller, T.A. and Brooks, R.P. and Lanzone, M. and Brandes, D. and Cooper, J. and O'Malley, K. and Maisonneuve, C. and Tremblay, J.A. and Duerr, A. and Katzner, T. },
    JOURNAL = { Conservation Biology },
    TITLE = { Assessing risk to birds from industrial wind energy development via paired resource selection models },
    YEAR = { 2014 },
    NOTE = { cited By 42 },
    NUMBER = { 3 },
    PAGES = { 745-755 },
    VOLUME = { 28 },
    ABSTRACT = { When wildlife habitat overlaps with industrial development animals may be harmed. Because wildlife and people select resources to maximize biological fitness and economic return, respectively, we estimated risk, the probability of eagles encountering and being affected by turbines, by overlaying models of resource selection for each entity. This conceptual framework can be applied across multiple spatial scales to understand and mitigate impacts of industry on wildlife. We estimated risk to Golden Eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) from wind energy development in 3 topographically distinct regions of the central Appalachian Mountains of Pennsylvania (United States) based on models of resource selection of wind facilities (n = 43) and of northbound migrating eagles (n = 30). Risk to eagles from wind energy was greatest in the Ridge and Valley region; all 24 eagles that passed through that region used the highest risk landscapes at least once during low altitude flight. In contrast, only half of the birds that entered the Allegheny Plateau region used highest risk landscapes and none did in the Allegheny Mountains. Likewise, in the Allegheny Mountains, the majority of wind turbines (56%) were situated in poor eagle habitat; thus, risk to eagles is lower there than in the Ridge and Valley, where only 1% of turbines are in poor eagle habitat. Risk within individual facilities was extremely variable; on average, facilities had 11% (SD 23; range = 0-100%) of turbines in highest risk landscapes and 26% (SD 30; range = 0-85%) of turbines in the lowest risk landscapes. Our results provide a mechanism for relocating high-risk turbines, and they show the feasibility of this novel and highly adaptable framework for managing risk of harm to wildlife from industrial development. © 2014 Society for Conservation Biology. },
    AFFILIATION = { The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, United States; Division of Forestry and Natural Resources, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506, United States; Department of Geography, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, United States; Cellular Tracking Technologies, Somerset, PA 15501, United States; Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Lafayette College, Easton, PA 18042, United States; Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, Fredericksburg, VA 22401, United States; West Virginia Division of Natural Resources, Romney, WV 26757, United States; Ministère des Ressources naturelles et de la Faune, Rimouski, QC G5L 8B3, Canada; Ministère des Ressources naturelles et de la Faune, Quebec City, QC G1S 4X4, Canada; United States Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Timber and Watershed Laboratory, Parsons, WV 26287, United States },
    AUTHOR_KEYWORDS = { Birds; Golden Eagle; Habitat modeling; Risk assessment; Spatial ecology; Wind energy development },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Article },
    DOI = { 10.1111/cobi.12227 },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84900397385&doi=10.1111%2fcobi.12227&partnerID=40&md5=c73621f2c2805d1f105c7ddb03fca742 },
}

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