CadieuxBoulangerCyrEtAl2020

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Cadieux, P., Boulanger, Y., Cyr, D., Taylor, A.R., Price, D.T., Sólymos, P., Stralberg, D., Chen, H.Y.H., Brecka, A., Tremblay, J.A. (2020) Projected effects of climate change on boreal bird community accentuated by anthropogenic disturbances in western boreal forest, Canada. Diversity and Distributions, 26(6):668-682. (Scopus )

Résumé

Aim: Climate change is expected to influence boreal bird communities significantly, notably through changes in forest habitat (composition and age structure), in the coming decades. How these changes will accumulate and interact with anthropogenic disturbances remains an open question for most species. Location: Northeastern Alberta, Canada. Methods: We used the LANDIS-II forest landscape model to project changes in forest landscapes, and associated bird populations (72 passerine species), according to three climatic scenarios (baseline, RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5) and three forest harvesting scenarios of differing intensity. Results: Both forest harvesting and climate-related drivers were projected to have large impacts on bird communities in this region. As a result of climate-induced increases in fire activity as well as decreased conifer productivity, our simulations projected that an important proportion of Alberta's boreal forests would transition to treeless habitat (i.e. grass- or shrub-dominated vegetation) while many conifer-dominated stands would likely be replaced by broadleaf tree cover. Consequently, the abundance of bird species associated with open and deciduous habitats were projected to increase. With a strong anthropogenic climate-forcing scenario (RCP 8.5), sharp declines in abundance of coniferous trees were also projected, particularly in mature and old forest stands, triggering major declines for bird species associated with coniferous and mixedwood forest types. Main conclusions: As the most comprehensive simulation of climate change and harvesting impacts on avian habitats in the North American boreal region to date, our study stresses the importance of considering key habitat characteristics like forest age structure and composition through forest landscape modelling and identifies 18 bird species particularly sensitive to climate change. Our simulations suggest that a change in forest management practices could play an important role in the conservation of boreal bird species vulnerable to climate change. The intensive forest harvesting simulated accelerated declines in bird abundance compared to a “no harvesting” scenario. © 2020 The Authors. Diversity and Distributions Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

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@ARTICLE { CadieuxBoulangerCyrEtAl2020,
    AUTHOR = { Cadieux, P. and Boulanger, Y. and Cyr, D. and Taylor, A.R. and Price, D.T. and Sólymos, P. and Stralberg, D. and Chen, H.Y.H. and Brecka, A. and Tremblay, J.A. },
    JOURNAL = { Diversity and Distributions },
    TITLE = { Projected effects of climate change on boreal bird community accentuated by anthropogenic disturbances in western boreal forest, Canada },
    YEAR = { 2020 },
    NOTE = { cited By 7 },
    NUMBER = { 6 },
    PAGES = { 668-682 },
    VOLUME = { 26 },
    ABSTRACT = { Aim: Climate change is expected to influence boreal bird communities significantly, notably through changes in forest habitat (composition and age structure), in the coming decades. How these changes will accumulate and interact with anthropogenic disturbances remains an open question for most species. Location: Northeastern Alberta, Canada. Methods: We used the LANDIS-II forest landscape model to project changes in forest landscapes, and associated bird populations (72 passerine species), according to three climatic scenarios (baseline, RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5) and three forest harvesting scenarios of differing intensity. Results: Both forest harvesting and climate-related drivers were projected to have large impacts on bird communities in this region. As a result of climate-induced increases in fire activity as well as decreased conifer productivity, our simulations projected that an important proportion of Alberta's boreal forests would transition to treeless habitat (i.e. grass- or shrub-dominated vegetation) while many conifer-dominated stands would likely be replaced by broadleaf tree cover. Consequently, the abundance of bird species associated with open and deciduous habitats were projected to increase. With a strong anthropogenic climate-forcing scenario (RCP 8.5), sharp declines in abundance of coniferous trees were also projected, particularly in mature and old forest stands, triggering major declines for bird species associated with coniferous and mixedwood forest types. Main conclusions: As the most comprehensive simulation of climate change and harvesting impacts on avian habitats in the North American boreal region to date, our study stresses the importance of considering key habitat characteristics like forest age structure and composition through forest landscape modelling and identifies 18 bird species particularly sensitive to climate change. Our simulations suggest that a change in forest management practices could play an important role in the conservation of boreal bird species vulnerable to climate change. The intensive forest harvesting simulated accelerated declines in bird abundance compared to a “no harvesting” scenario. © 2020 The Authors. Diversity and Distributions Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. },
    AFFILIATION = { Sciences et Technology Branch, Environment and Climate Change Canada, Québec, QC, Canada; Laurentian Forestry Centre, Canadian Forest Service, Natural Resources Canada, Québec, QC, Canada; Sciences et Technology Branch, Environment and Climate Change Canada, Gatineau, QC, Canada; Atlantic Forestry Centre, Canadian Forest Service, Natural Resources Canada, Fredericton, NB, Canada; Northern Forestry Centre, Canadian Forest Service, Natural Resources Canada, Edmonton, AB, Canada; Department of Biological Sciences, Biological Sciences Building, Alberta Biodiversity Monitoring Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada; Boreal Avian Modelling Project, Edmonton, AB, Canada; Department of Renewable Resources, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada; Faculty of Natural Resources Management, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, ON, Canada; Key Laboratory for Humid Sub-tropical Eco-geographical Processes of the Ministry of Education, Institute of Geographical Sciences, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou, China },
    AUTHOR_KEYWORDS = { boreal avifauna; climate change; forest landscape models; forest management; LANDIS-II; old boreal forests; wildfire },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Article },
    DOI = { 10.1111/ddi.13057 },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85082414408&doi=10.1111%2fddi.13057&partnerID=40&md5=47121376ab06830a8136335e1beb886d },
}

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