PavyDeschenesBlaisEtAl2013

Référence

Pavy, N., Deschênes, A., Blais, S., Lavigne, P., Beaulieu, J., Isabel, N., MacKay, J. and Bousquet, J. (2013) The Landscape of Nucleotide Polymorphism among 13,500 Genes of the Conifer Picea glauca, Relationships with Functions, and Comparison with Medicago truncatula. Genome Biology and Evolution, 5(10):1910-1925. (URL )

Résumé

Gene families differ in composition, expression, and chromosomal organization between conifers and angiosperms, but little is known regarding nucleotide polymorphism. Using various sequencing strategies, an atlas of 212k high-confidence single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with a validation rate of more than 92% was developed for the conifer white spruce (Picea glauca). Nonsynonymous and synonymous SNPs were annotated over the corresponding 13,498 white spruce genes representative of 2,457 known gene families. Patterns of nucleotide polymorphisms were analyzed by estimating the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous numbers of substitutions per site (A/S). A general excess of synonymous SNPs was expected and observed. However, the analysis from several perspectives enabled to identify groups of genes harboring an excess of nonsynonymous SNPs, thus potentially under positive selection. Four known gene families harbored such an excess: dehydrins, ankyrin-repeats, AP2/DREB, and leucine-rich repeat. Conifer-specific sequences were also generally associated with the highest A/S ratios. A/S values were also distributed asymmetrically across genes specifically expressed in megagametophytes, roots, or in both, harboring on average an excess of nonsynonymous SNPs. These patterns confirm that the breadth of gene expression is a contributing factor to the evolution of nucleotide polymorphism. The A/S ratios of Medicago truncatula genes were also analyzed: several gene families shared between P. glauca and M. truncatula data sets had similar excess of synonymous or nonsynonymous SNPs. However, a number of families with high A/S ratios were found specific to P. glauca, suggesting cases of divergent evolution at the functional level.

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@ARTICLE { PavyDeschenesBlaisEtAl2013,
    AUTHOR = { Pavy, N. and Deschênes, A. and Blais, S. and Lavigne, P. and Beaulieu, J. and Isabel, N. and MacKay, J. and Bousquet, J. },
    TITLE = { The Landscape of Nucleotide Polymorphism among 13,500 Genes of the Conifer Picea glauca, Relationships with Functions, and Comparison with Medicago truncatula },
    JOURNAL = { Genome Biology and Evolution },
    YEAR = { 2013 },
    VOLUME = { 5 },
    PAGES = { 1910-1925 },
    NUMBER = { 10 },
    ABSTRACT = { Gene families differ in composition, expression, and chromosomal organization between conifers and angiosperms, but little is known regarding nucleotide polymorphism. Using various sequencing strategies, an atlas of 212k high-confidence single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with a validation rate of more than 92% was developed for the conifer white spruce (Picea glauca). Nonsynonymous and synonymous SNPs were annotated over the corresponding 13,498 white spruce genes representative of 2,457 known gene families. Patterns of nucleotide polymorphisms were analyzed by estimating the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous numbers of substitutions per site (A/S). A general excess of synonymous SNPs was expected and observed. However, the analysis from several perspectives enabled to identify groups of genes harboring an excess of nonsynonymous SNPs, thus potentially under positive selection. Four known gene families harbored such an excess: dehydrins, ankyrin-repeats, AP2/DREB, and leucine-rich repeat. Conifer-specific sequences were also generally associated with the highest A/S ratios. A/S values were also distributed asymmetrically across genes specifically expressed in megagametophytes, roots, or in both, harboring on average an excess of nonsynonymous SNPs. These patterns confirm that the breadth of gene expression is a contributing factor to the evolution of nucleotide polymorphism. The A/S ratios of Medicago truncatula genes were also analyzed: several gene families shared between P. glauca and M. truncatula data sets had similar excess of synonymous or nonsynonymous SNPs. However, a number of families with high A/S ratios were found specific to P. glauca, suggesting cases of divergent evolution at the functional level. },
    DOI = { 10.1093/gbe/evt143 },
    EPRINT = { http://gbe.oxfordjournals.org/content/5/10/1910.full.pdf+html },
    URL = { http://gbe.oxfordjournals.org/content/5/10/1910.abstract },
}

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