SauchynVanstoneStJacquesEtAl2015

Référence

Sauchyn, D., Vanstone, J., St-Jacques, J.-M. and Sauchyn, R. (2015) Dendrohydrology in Canada's western interior and applications to water resource management. Journal of Hydrology, 529(P2):548-558. (Scopus )

Résumé

Across the southern Canadian Prairies, annual precipitation is relatively low (200-400. mm) and periodic water deficits limit economic and environmental productivity. Rapid population growth, economic development and climate change have exposed this region to increasing vulnerability to hydrologic drought. There is high demand for surface water, streamflow from the Rocky Mountains in particular. This paper describes the application of dendrohydrology to water resource management in this region. Four projects were initiated by the sponsoring organizations: a private utility, an urban municipality and two federal government agencies. The fact that government and industry would initiate and fund tree-ring research indicates that practitioners recognize paleohydrology as a legitimate source of technical support for water resource planning and management. The major advantage of tree-rings as a proxy of annual and seasonal streamflow is that the reconstructions exceed the length of gauge records by at least several centuries. The extent of our network of 180 tree-ring chronologies, spanning AD 549-2013 and ~20° of latitude, with a high density of sites in the headwaters of the major river basins, enables us to construct large ensembles of tree-ring reconstructions as a means of expressing uncertainty in the inference of streamflow from tree rings. We characterize paleo-droughts in terms of modern analogues, translating the tree-ring reconstructions from a paleo-time scale to the time frame in which engineers and planners operate. Water resource managers and policy analysts have used our paleo-drought scenarios in their various forms to inform and assist drought preparedness planning, a re-evaluation of surface water apportionment policy and an assessment of the reliability of urban water supply systems. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

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@ARTICLE { SauchynVanstoneStJacquesEtAl2015,
    AUTHOR = { Sauchyn, D. and Vanstone, J. and St-Jacques, J.-M. and Sauchyn, R. },
    TITLE = { Dendrohydrology in Canada's western interior and applications to water resource management },
    JOURNAL = { Journal of Hydrology },
    YEAR = { 2015 },
    VOLUME = { 529 },
    NUMBER = { P2 },
    PAGES = { 548-558 },
    NOTE = { cited By 3 },
    ABSTRACT = { Across the southern Canadian Prairies, annual precipitation is relatively low (200-400. mm) and periodic water deficits limit economic and environmental productivity. Rapid population growth, economic development and climate change have exposed this region to increasing vulnerability to hydrologic drought. There is high demand for surface water, streamflow from the Rocky Mountains in particular. This paper describes the application of dendrohydrology to water resource management in this region. Four projects were initiated by the sponsoring organizations: a private utility, an urban municipality and two federal government agencies. The fact that government and industry would initiate and fund tree-ring research indicates that practitioners recognize paleohydrology as a legitimate source of technical support for water resource planning and management. The major advantage of tree-rings as a proxy of annual and seasonal streamflow is that the reconstructions exceed the length of gauge records by at least several centuries. The extent of our network of 180 tree-ring chronologies, spanning AD 549-2013 and ~20° of latitude, with a high density of sites in the headwaters of the major river basins, enables us to construct large ensembles of tree-ring reconstructions as a means of expressing uncertainty in the inference of streamflow from tree rings. We characterize paleo-droughts in terms of modern analogues, translating the tree-ring reconstructions from a paleo-time scale to the time frame in which engineers and planners operate. Water resource managers and policy analysts have used our paleo-drought scenarios in their various forms to inform and assist drought preparedness planning, a re-evaluation of surface water apportionment policy and an assessment of the reliability of urban water supply systems. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. },
    AFFILIATION = { Prairie Adaptation Research Collaborative, University of Regina, Regina, Canada; Department of Mechanical Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, Canada },
    AUTHOR_KEYWORDS = { Applied paleohydrology; Canadian Prairies; Dendrochronology; Streamflow reconstructions; Water resource management },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Article },
    DOI = { 10.1016/j.jhydrol.2014.11.049 },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84941259252&doi=10.1016%2fj.jhydrol.2014.11.049&partnerID=40&md5=0cb6beab1b548e47419a1ddb91135e2f },
}

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