VuorinenKolstadDeVriendtEtAl2020

Référence

Vuorinen, K.E.M., Kolstad, A.L., De Vriendt, L., Austrheim, G., Tremblay, J.-P., Solberg, E.J., Speed, J.D.M. (2020) Cool as a moose: How can browsing counteract climate warming effects across boreal forest ecosystems? Ecology, 101(11). (Scopus )

Résumé

Herbivory has potential to modify vegetation responses to climatic changes. However, climate and herbivory also affect each other, and rarely work in isolation from other ecological factors, such as plant–plant competition. Thus, it is challenging to predict the extent to which herbivory can counteract, amplify, or interact with climate impacts on ecosystems. Here, we investigate how moose modify climatic responses of boreal trees by using experimental exclosures on two continents and modeling complex causal pathways including several climatic factors, multiple tree species, competition, tree height, time, food availability, and herbivore presence, density, and browsing intensity. We show that moose can counteract, that is, “cool down” positive temperature responses of trees, but that this effect varies between species depending on moose foraging preferences. Growth of preferred deciduous trees was strongly affected by moose, whereas growth of less preferred conifers was mostly driven by climate and tree height. In addition, moose changed temperature responses of rowan in Norway and balsam fir in Canada, by making fir more responsive to temperature but decreasing the strength of the temperature response of rowan. Snow protected trees from browsing, and therefore moose “cooling power” might increase should a warming climate result in decreased snow cover. Furthermore, we found evidence of indirect effects of moose via plant–plant competition: By constraining growth of competing trees, moose can contribute positively to the growth of other trees. Our study shows that in boreal forests, herbivory cooling power is highly context dependent, and in order to understand its potential to prevent changes induced by warming climate, species differences, snow, competition, and climate effects on browsing need to be considered. © 2020 The Authors. Ecology published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of Ecological Society of America

Format EndNote

Vous pouvez importer cette référence dans EndNote.

Format BibTeX-CSV

Vous pouvez importer cette référence en format BibTeX-CSV.

Format BibTeX

Vous pouvez copier l'entrée BibTeX de cette référence ci-bas, ou l'importer directement dans un logiciel tel que JabRef .

@ARTICLE { VuorinenKolstadDeVriendtEtAl2020,
    AUTHOR = { Vuorinen, K.E.M. and Kolstad, A.L. and De Vriendt, L. and Austrheim, G. and Tremblay, J.-P. and Solberg, E.J. and Speed, J.D.M. },
    JOURNAL = { Ecology },
    TITLE = { Cool as a moose: How can browsing counteract climate warming effects across boreal forest ecosystems? },
    YEAR = { 2020 },
    NOTE = { cited By 2 },
    NUMBER = { 11 },
    VOLUME = { 101 },
    ABSTRACT = { Herbivory has potential to modify vegetation responses to climatic changes. However, climate and herbivory also affect each other, and rarely work in isolation from other ecological factors, such as plant–plant competition. Thus, it is challenging to predict the extent to which herbivory can counteract, amplify, or interact with climate impacts on ecosystems. Here, we investigate how moose modify climatic responses of boreal trees by using experimental exclosures on two continents and modeling complex causal pathways including several climatic factors, multiple tree species, competition, tree height, time, food availability, and herbivore presence, density, and browsing intensity. We show that moose can counteract, that is, “cool down” positive temperature responses of trees, but that this effect varies between species depending on moose foraging preferences. Growth of preferred deciduous trees was strongly affected by moose, whereas growth of less preferred conifers was mostly driven by climate and tree height. In addition, moose changed temperature responses of rowan in Norway and balsam fir in Canada, by making fir more responsive to temperature but decreasing the strength of the temperature response of rowan. Snow protected trees from browsing, and therefore moose “cooling power” might increase should a warming climate result in decreased snow cover. Furthermore, we found evidence of indirect effects of moose via plant–plant competition: By constraining growth of competing trees, moose can contribute positively to the growth of other trees. Our study shows that in boreal forests, herbivory cooling power is highly context dependent, and in order to understand its potential to prevent changes induced by warming climate, species differences, snow, competition, and climate effects on browsing need to be considered. © 2020 The Authors. Ecology published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of Ecological Society of America },
    AFFILIATION = { Department of Natural History, NTNU University Museum, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Erling Skakkes gate 47 A, Trondheim, NO-7491, Norway; Department of Biology, Laval University, 1045 Avenue de la Médecine, Québec City, QC G1V 0A6, Canada; Center for Forest Research (CEF), Pavillon Abitibi-Price, 2405 Rue de la Terrasse, Sainte-Foy, Québec City, QC G1V 0A6, Canada; Center for Northern Studies (CEN), Laval University, Abitibi-Price building, 2405 rue de la Terrasse, Québec City, QC G1V 0A6, Canada; Norwegian Institute for Nature Research, P.O. Box 5685, Trondheim, NO-7485, Norway },
    ART_NUMBER = { e03159 },
    AUTHOR_KEYWORDS = { birch; boreal forest; browsing; climate changes; fir; moose; pine; rowan; spruce; structural equation modeling },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Article },
    DOI = { 10.1002/ecy.3159 },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85090430399&doi=10.1002%2fecy.3159&partnerID=40&md5=d8fff08f77ab4d58e10bba972c607a3d },
}

********************************************************** *************************** FRQNT ************************ **********************************************************

Le CEF est un
regroupement stratégique du

********************************************************** *********************** Infolettre *********************** **********************************************************

Abonnez-vous à
l'Infolettre du CEF!

**********************************************************

***************** Formations et Écoles d'été ****************** **********************************************************

Formations et Écoles d'été

Analyse des pistes et modélisation par équations structurelles pour écologistes 
2 au 6 mai 2022, Sherbrooke

********************************************************** ***************** Pub - Colloque du CEF ****************** **********************************************************

********************************************************** ***************** Pub - NADEF 2022 ****************** **********************************************************

15 au 25 Juin à la FERLD

**********************************************************

***************** Pub - Symphonies_Boreales ****************** **********************************************************

********************************************************** ***************** Boîte à trucs *************** **********************************************************

CEF-Référence
La référence vedette !

  • Voici une liste (clairement incomplète) des packages R axés sur l'écologie! N'hésitez pas à ajouter à la liste

Voir les autres...