HiddingTremblayCote2013

Référence

Hidding, B., Tremblay, J.-P. and Cote, S.D. (2013) A large herbivore triggers alternative successional trajectories in the boreal forest. Ecology, 94(12):2852-2860. (Scopus )

Résumé

Alternative successional trajectories (AST) may result in multiple climax states within an ecosystem when disturbances affect colonization history. In the boreal forest, ungulates have been proposed to drive AST because, under herbivore pressure, preferred species may go extinct and apparent competition may benefit browsing-resistant species. Over a 15-year period following logging, we tested whether deer herbivory altered plant species composition and whether the competitive advantage of resistant species was maintained following herbivore removal. We compared exclosures built immediately after logging with delayed exclosures built eight years later on Anticosti Island, Quebec, Canada. Although the palatable tree Betula papyrifera (paper birch) and some palatable herbs recovered in delayed exclosures, we observed legacies in both tree and herb cover. Woody regeneration in delayed exclosures was dominated by Picea glauca (white spruce), and Poaceae (grasses) were abundant in the field layer. Given that only early-successional species recovered, whereas latesuccessional broadleaf species and Abies balsamea (balsam fir) remained rare, succession may follow an AST after a limited browsing period during early succession. © 2013 by the Ecological Society of America.

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@ARTICLE { HiddingTremblayCote2013,
    AUTHOR = { Hidding, B. and Tremblay, J.-P. and Cote, S.D. },
    TITLE = { A large herbivore triggers alternative successional trajectories in the boreal forest },
    JOURNAL = { Ecology },
    YEAR = { 2013 },
    VOLUME = { 94 },
    PAGES = { 2852-2860 },
    NUMBER = { 12 },
    NOTE = { cited By 6 },
    ABSTRACT = { Alternative successional trajectories (AST) may result in multiple climax states within an ecosystem when disturbances affect colonization history. In the boreal forest, ungulates have been proposed to drive AST because, under herbivore pressure, preferred species may go extinct and apparent competition may benefit browsing-resistant species. Over a 15-year period following logging, we tested whether deer herbivory altered plant species composition and whether the competitive advantage of resistant species was maintained following herbivore removal. We compared exclosures built immediately after logging with delayed exclosures built eight years later on Anticosti Island, Quebec, Canada. Although the palatable tree Betula papyrifera (paper birch) and some palatable herbs recovered in delayed exclosures, we observed legacies in both tree and herb cover. Woody regeneration in delayed exclosures was dominated by Picea glauca (white spruce), and Poaceae (grasses) were abundant in the field layer. Given that only early-successional species recovered, whereas latesuccessional broadleaf species and Abies balsamea (balsam fir) remained rare, succession may follow an AST after a limited browsing period during early succession. © 2013 by the Ecological Society of America. },
    AUTHOR_KEYWORDS = { Alternative successional pathways; Anticosti Island, Quebec, Canada; Community assembly; Forest regeneration; Herbivore resistance; Herbivory; Legacy effect; Recruitment facilitation; Resilience; Succession; White-tailed deer },
    CODEN = { ECOLA },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Article },
    DOI = { 10.1890/12-2015.1 },
    ISSN = { 00129658 },
    KEYWORDS = { boreal forest; colonization; environmental disturbance; herbivore; island; life history trait; recovery; succession, Anticosti Island; Canada; Quebec [Canada], animal; article; Canada; deer; ecosystem; environmental monitoring; feeding behavior; physiology; population dynamics; tree, Animals; Deer; Ecosystem; Environmental Monitoring; Feeding Behavior; Population Dynamics; Quebec; Trees },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-84888083520&partnerID=40&md5=519353e2777d83dedb595b4a3a6aae4d },
}

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