MitchellRuel2015

Référence

Mitchell, S.J. and Ruel, J.-C. (2015) Modeling windthrow at stand and landscape scales. In Simulation Modeling of Forest Landscape Disturbances, Springer International Publishing, pages 17-43. (Scopus )

Résumé

Wind damage to trees and stands has ecological and management implications. The spectrum of damage can range from creation of canopy gaps and development of multi-cohort (uneven-aged) stands, to whole-stand replacement and initiation of single-cohort (even-aged) stands (e.g., Kramer et al. 2001; Busby et al. 2008; Bouchard et al. 2009). Individual trees can be broken or uprooted. Soil inversion by overturned rootwads leads to complex microtopography, improves soil fertility (Schaetzl et al. 1989; Kramer et al. 2004), and creates a regeneration niche for many tree and understory plant species (Ulanova 2000). On steep slopes, the disturbance contributes to downslope movement of soil (Gallaway et al. 2009). In managed forests, as well as rural and urban landscapes, windthrow damages crop and amenity trees, affects conservation and recreation values, and poses a threat to human life and built structures (Fig. 2.1a; Schmidlin 2009). Rather than being viewed as individual catastrophic events, windthrowis more realistically viewed as a recurrent disturbance process, with an inverse relationship between event frequency and severity. At a given location, the likelihood and severity result from interactions among regional wind climate and local terrain, vegetation, and management regime (Mitchell 2013). Scientists use models to improve their understanding of the processes underlying forest disturbances and to integrate results of empirical, biomechanical, and numerical investigations. Ideally, the models or the results of modeling are presented in the form of decision support tools (e.g., Hanewinkel et al. 2011) that can be used by resource and conservation managers as well as those responsible for public utilities to evaluate windthrow risk and develop mitigative responses in a wide range of forest conditions. © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015.

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@INCOLLECTION { MitchellRuel2015,
    AUTHOR = { Mitchell, S.J. and Ruel, J.-C. },
    TITLE = { Modeling windthrow at stand and landscape scales },
    BOOKTITLE = { Simulation Modeling of Forest Landscape Disturbances },
    PUBLISHER = { Springer International Publishing },
    YEAR = { 2015 },
    PAGES = { 17-43 },
    NOTE = { cited By 0 },
    ABSTRACT = { Wind damage to trees and stands has ecological and management implications. The spectrum of damage can range from creation of canopy gaps and development of multi-cohort (uneven-aged) stands, to whole-stand replacement and initiation of single-cohort (even-aged) stands (e.g., Kramer et al. 2001; Busby et al. 2008; Bouchard et al. 2009). Individual trees can be broken or uprooted. Soil inversion by overturned rootwads leads to complex microtopography, improves soil fertility (Schaetzl et al. 1989; Kramer et al. 2004), and creates a regeneration niche for many tree and understory plant species (Ulanova 2000). On steep slopes, the disturbance contributes to downslope movement of soil (Gallaway et al. 2009). In managed forests, as well as rural and urban landscapes, windthrow damages crop and amenity trees, affects conservation and recreation values, and poses a threat to human life and built structures (Fig. 2.1a; Schmidlin 2009). Rather than being viewed as individual catastrophic events, windthrowis more realistically viewed as a recurrent disturbance process, with an inverse relationship between event frequency and severity. At a given location, the likelihood and severity result from interactions among regional wind climate and local terrain, vegetation, and management regime (Mitchell 2013). Scientists use models to improve their understanding of the processes underlying forest disturbances and to integrate results of empirical, biomechanical, and numerical investigations. Ideally, the models or the results of modeling are presented in the form of decision support tools (e.g., Hanewinkel et al. 2011) that can be used by resource and conservation managers as well as those responsible for public utilities to evaluate windthrow risk and develop mitigative responses in a wide range of forest conditions. © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015. },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Book Chapter },
    DOI = { 10.1007/978-3-319-19809-5_2 },
    JOURNAL = { Simulation Modeling of Forest Landscape Disturbances },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-84944188507&partnerID=40&md5=2976eb90cde59b2f49e613ec17bb6511 },
}

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