KnightHarrisonScarpignatoEtAl2021

Référence

Knight, E.C., Harrison, A.-L., Scarpignato, A.L., Van Wilgenburg, S.L., Bayne, E.M., Ng, J.W., Angell, E., Bowman, R., Brigham, R.M., Drolet, B., Easton, W.E., Forrester, T.R., Foster, J.T., Haché, S., Hannah, K.C., Hick, K.G., Ibarzabal, J., Imlay, T.L., Mackenzie, S.A., Marsh, A., McGuire, L.P., Newberry, G.N., Newstead, D., Sidler, A., Sinclair, P.H., Stephens, J.L., Swanson, D.L., Tremblay, J.A., Marra, P.P. (2021) Comprehensive estimation of spatial and temporal migratory connectivity across the annual cycle to direct conservation efforts. Ecography, 44(5):665-679. (Scopus )

Résumé

Migratory connectivity is the degree to which populations are linked in space and time across the annual cycle. Low connectivity indicates mixing of populations while high connectivity indicates population separation in space or time. High migratory connectivity makes individual populations susceptible to local environmental conditions; therefore, evaluating migratory connectivity continuously across a species range is important for understanding differential population trends and revealing places and times contributing to these differences. The common nighthawk Chordeiles minor is a widespread, declining, long-distance migratory bird. Variable population trends across the nighthawk breeding range suggest that knowledge of migratory connectivity is needed to direct conservation. We used GPS tags to track 52 individuals from 12 breeding populations. We estimated migratory connectivity as 0.29 (Mantel coefficient: 0 = no connectivity, 1 = full connectivity) between the breeding and wintering grounds. We then estimated migratory connectivity at every latitude (spatial connectivity) or day (temporal connectivity) of migration and smoothed those migratory connectivity estimates to produce continuous migratory connectivity ‘profiles'. Spatial and temporal connectivity were highest during migration through North America (around 0.3–0.6), with values generally around 0 in Central and South America due to mixing of populations along a common migratory route and similar migration timing across populations. We found local peaks in spatial and temporal connectivity during migration associated with crossing the Gulf of Mexico. We used simulations to estimate the probability that our method missed peaks (spatial: 0.12, temporal: 0.18) or detected false peaks (spatial: 0.11, temporal: 0.37) due to data gaps and showed that our approach remains useful even for sparse and/or sporadic location data. Our study presents a generalizable approach to evaluating migratory connectivity across the full annual cycle that can be used to focus migratory bird conservation towards places and times of the annual cycle where populations are more likely to be limited. © 2021 The Authors. Ecography published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Nordic Society Oikos

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@ARTICLE { KnightHarrisonScarpignatoEtAl2021,
    AUTHOR = { Knight, E.C. and Harrison, A.-L. and Scarpignato, A.L. and Van Wilgenburg, S.L. and Bayne, E.M. and Ng, J.W. and Angell, E. and Bowman, R. and Brigham, R.M. and Drolet, B. and Easton, W.E. and Forrester, T.R. and Foster, J.T. and Haché, S. and Hannah, K.C. and Hick, K.G. and Ibarzabal, J. and Imlay, T.L. and Mackenzie, S.A. and Marsh, A. and McGuire, L.P. and Newberry, G.N. and Newstead, D. and Sidler, A. and Sinclair, P.H. and Stephens, J.L. and Swanson, D.L. and Tremblay, J.A. and Marra, P.P. },
    JOURNAL = { Ecography },
    TITLE = { Comprehensive estimation of spatial and temporal migratory connectivity across the annual cycle to direct conservation efforts },
    YEAR = { 2021 },
    NOTE = { cited By 3 },
    NUMBER = { 5 },
    PAGES = { 665-679 },
    VOLUME = { 44 },
    ABSTRACT = { Migratory connectivity is the degree to which populations are linked in space and time across the annual cycle. Low connectivity indicates mixing of populations while high connectivity indicates population separation in space or time. High migratory connectivity makes individual populations susceptible to local environmental conditions; therefore, evaluating migratory connectivity continuously across a species range is important for understanding differential population trends and revealing places and times contributing to these differences. The common nighthawk Chordeiles minor is a widespread, declining, long-distance migratory bird. Variable population trends across the nighthawk breeding range suggest that knowledge of migratory connectivity is needed to direct conservation. We used GPS tags to track 52 individuals from 12 breeding populations. We estimated migratory connectivity as 0.29 (Mantel coefficient: 0 = no connectivity, 1 = full connectivity) between the breeding and wintering grounds. We then estimated migratory connectivity at every latitude (spatial connectivity) or day (temporal connectivity) of migration and smoothed those migratory connectivity estimates to produce continuous migratory connectivity ‘profiles'. Spatial and temporal connectivity were highest during migration through North America (around 0.3–0.6), with values generally around 0 in Central and South America due to mixing of populations along a common migratory route and similar migration timing across populations. We found local peaks in spatial and temporal connectivity during migration associated with crossing the Gulf of Mexico. We used simulations to estimate the probability that our method missed peaks (spatial: 0.12, temporal: 0.18) or detected false peaks (spatial: 0.11, temporal: 0.37) due to data gaps and showed that our approach remains useful even for sparse and/or sporadic location data. Our study presents a generalizable approach to evaluating migratory connectivity across the full annual cycle that can be used to focus migratory bird conservation towards places and times of the annual cycle where populations are more likely to be limited. © 2021 The Authors. Ecography published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Nordic Society Oikos },
    AFFILIATION = { Dept of Biological Sciences, Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada; Migratory Bird Center, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Inst., National Zoological Park, Washington, DC, United States; Dept of Biology and McCourt School of Public Policy, Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC, United States; Environment and Climate Change Canada, Canadian Wildlife Service, Saskatoon, SK, Canada; Avian Ecology Program, Archbold Biological Station, Venus, FL, United States; Dept of Biology, Univ. of Regina, Regina, SK, Canada; Montana Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit, Univ. of Montana, Missoula, MT, United States; Pathogen and Microbiome Inst., Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff, AZ, United States; Wildlife Research Division, Science and Technology Branch, Environment and Climate Change Canada, QC, Canada; Dépt des Sciences Fondamentales, Univ. du Québec à Chicoutimi, Chicoutimi, QC, Canada; Birds Canada, Port Rowan, ON, Canada; Lotek Wireless Inc., St John's, NL, Canada; Dept of Biological Sciences, Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX, United States; Dept of Biology, Univ. of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada; Dept of Biology, Univ. of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD, United States; Coastal Bend Bays & Estuaries Program, Corpus Christi, TX, United States; Klamath Bird Observatory, Ashland, OR, United States },
    AUTHOR_KEYWORDS = { aerial insectivore; full annual cycle; migration; migratory connectivity; movement; population trend },
    DOCUMENT_TYPE = { Article },
    DOI = { 10.1111/ecog.05111 },
    SOURCE = { Scopus },
    URL = { https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85100184312&doi=10.1111%2fecog.05111&partnerID=40&md5=9119abde0ab53048173114352b076311 },
}

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