GagnonChazarencKAµivEtAl2012

Référence

Gagnon, V., Chazarenc, F., Kõiv, M. and Brisson, J. (2012) Effect of plant species on water quality at the outlet of a sludge treatment wetland. Water Research, 46(16):5305-5315. (Scopus )

Résumé

Sludge treatment wetlands are mainly used to reduce the volume of activated sludge, and the pollutants at the outlet are generally returned to the wastewater treatment plant. However, in cases where sludges are produced far from treatment plants not only must the sludge be treated, but the discharge of pollutants into the surrounding environment must also be limited. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of different plant species in optimising pollutant removal in a decentralised sludge treatment wetland. In addition, a new system design was assessed, in which the wetland was not completely drained, and a saturated layer was created using an overflow. The experimental setup consisted of 16 mesocosms in total, planted with monocultures of Phragmites australis, Typha angustifolia and Scirpus fluviatilis, and unplanted controls, each in four replicates.The experiment was conducted during the third summer of operation after setup. The system was fed with highly concentrated fish farm sludge at a load of 30 kg of total solids m-2 yr-1. Results showed that such wetlands were highly efficient, with removal rates between 94% and 99% for most pollutants. Planted systems generally outperformed the unplanted control, with a significantly lower mass of pollutants at the outlet of the sludge treatment wetland planted with Phragmites, followed by those with Typha and then Scirpus. The distinct influence of plant species on pollution removal was explained by the sequestration of nitrogen and phosphorus in plant tissues and by the rhizosphere effect, which enhance the biodegradation of organic matter, allowed the nitrification process and created redox conditions favourable to the sorption of phosphorus. Filtration and evapotranspiration rates played a major role in limiting the discharge of pollutants, and the impact was enhanced by the fact that the sludge treatment wetland was not completely drained. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

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@ARTICLE { GagnonChazarencKAµivEtAl2012,
    AUTHOR = { Gagnon, V. and Chazarenc, F. and Kõiv, M. and Brisson, J. },
    TITLE = { Effect of plant species on water quality at the outlet of a sludge treatment wetland },
    JOURNAL = { Water Research },
    YEAR = { 2012 },
    VOLUME = { 46 },
    PAGES = { 5305-5315 },
    NUMBER = { 16 },
    ABSTRACT = { Sludge treatment wetlands are mainly used to reduce the volume of activated sludge, and the pollutants at the outlet are generally returned to the wastewater treatment plant. However, in cases where sludges are produced far from treatment plants not only must the sludge be treated, but the discharge of pollutants into the surrounding environment must also be limited. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of different plant species in optimising pollutant removal in a decentralised sludge treatment wetland. In addition, a new system design was assessed, in which the wetland was not completely drained, and a saturated layer was created using an overflow. The experimental setup consisted of 16 mesocosms in total, planted with monocultures of Phragmites australis, Typha angustifolia and Scirpus fluviatilis, and unplanted controls, each in four replicates.The experiment was conducted during the third summer of operation after setup. The system was fed with highly concentrated fish farm sludge at a load of 30 kg of total solids m-2 yr-1. Results showed that such wetlands were highly efficient, with removal rates between 94% and 99% for most pollutants. Planted systems generally outperformed the unplanted control, with a significantly lower mass of pollutants at the outlet of the sludge treatment wetland planted with Phragmites, followed by those with Typha and then Scirpus. The distinct influence of plant species on pollution removal was explained by the sequestration of nitrogen and phosphorus in plant tissues and by the rhizosphere effect, which enhance the biodegradation of organic matter, allowed the nitrification process and created redox conditions favourable to the sorption of phosphorus. Filtration and evapotranspiration rates played a major role in limiting the discharge of pollutants, and the impact was enhanced by the fact that the sludge treatment wetland was not completely drained. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. },
    COMMENT = { Export Date: 20 February 2013 Source: Scopus CODEN: WATRA doi: 10.1016/j.watres.2012.07.007 },
    ISSN = { 00431354 (ISSN) },
    KEYWORDS = { Evapotranspiration, Fish farm sludge, Hybrid constructed wetland, Invasive species, Sludge drying bed, Vertical flow constructed wetland, Constructed wetlands, Fish farms, Invasive species, Sludge drying, Vertical flow constructed wetlands, Aquaculture, Biodegradation, Evapotranspiration, Nitrification, Nitrogen removal, Phosphorus, Pollution, Soils, Sorption, Tissue, Water quality, Water supply, Wetlands, nitrogen, organic matter, phosphorus, activated sludge, aquaculture effluent, biodegradation, constructed wetland, en echelon structure, evapotranspiration, filtration, flow pattern, grass, invasive species, mesocosm, monoculture, organic matter, phosphorus, phytoremediation, plant community, pollutant removal, redox conditions, sedge, sorption, waste facility, waste treatment, water quality, article, biodegradation, controlled study, filtration, mesocosm, monoculture, nitrification, nonhuman, oxidation reduction reaction, Phragmites, Phragmites australis, pisciculture, plant, plant tissue, priority journal, rhizosphere, scirpus fluviatilis, sludge treatment, solid, statistical significance, summer, Typha angustifolia, water pollutant, water quality, wetland, Analysis of Variance, Aquaculture, Biomass, Cyperaceae, Poaceae, Sewage, Typhaceae, Waste Disposal, Fluid, Water Loss, Insensible, Water Pollutants, Chemical, Water Quality, Wetlands, Phragmites, Phragmites australis, Schoenoplectus fluviatilis, Scirpus, Typha, Typha angustifolia },
    OWNER = { Luc },
    TIMESTAMP = { 2013.02.20 },
    URL = { http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-84865956101&partnerID=40&md5=606bb92ff569170d57d559f040cce559 },
}

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